Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

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Middle School Music Teachers Invited

November 23, 2014

Bay Chamber Concerts and Music School invitation – Free Student Matinee

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Bay Chamber Concerts and Music School invites Maine middle school music teachers and their students to Camden for a free matinee performance.

Overboard
Friday, March 27 at 9:30am
Camden Opera House

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This renowned 5-member a cappella group from Boston will perform a free student matinee for area middle schoolers as part of the ensemble’s three day residency in Maine.

Please contact Monica Kelly at monica@baychamberconcerts.org for more information or to reserve your spot.

Limited seating available – 50 seats per school maximum.

Visit http://www.overboardvocals.com/ to learn more about Overboard.

Presenting Residency Sponsor: Slim Goodbody Corporation/John & Christine Burstein.

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Community Cast Join Louisville Orchestra

November 19, 2014

Louisville Orchestra

Teddy Abrams, the Louisville Orchestra, and a community cast of hundreds come together to create a powerhouse performance of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana. It is very cool to see the number of people who come together for this performance. High schools, community choirs, professional choirs join to make an incredible sound.

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For Once in My Life

November 14, 2014

Capitol Children’s Choir of London

The Capital Children’s Choir of London, England does their own version of Stevie Wonder’s “For Once In My Life,”. I love it!

 

 

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Impact of Music on the Brain

November 5, 2014

Below is a Youtube that provides information on how playing an instrument impacts your brain by Anita Collins

 

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Another Student’s Story: Aaron Robinson

October 22, 2014

An interview with musician Aaron Robinson

Periodically individuals are featured on the Maine Arts Education blog as part of a series called “Another Student’s Story”. Their “Arts” stories are shared with you, the Arts Education community. Please share with others. If you know of anyone who should be sharing their stories, please contact me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

Aaron Robinson is an award-winning composer, conductor, musicologist and best-selling author. He has written for television, film, radio and the theatrical Choralstage. Aaron has recorded several best-selling albums including ‘They All Played Ragtime’, ‘Black Nativity – In Concert: A Gospel Celebration’ and ‘The Legend of Jim Cullen – A Dramatic Musical’, among others. He is the author of the best-selling memoir: ‘Does God Sing – A Musical Journey’.

Aaron attended Medomak Valley High School in Waldoboro and graduated in 1989. He attended the Boston Conservatory of Music and studied Composition with John Adams and Thomas Lawrence Bell and Film Score at Berklee School of Music with John Williams.

Aaron was kind enough to answer the following questions for the Maine Arts Education blog readers.

What do you value most from your arts education?

The greatest gift I received from my education at the High School level was the validation, support and advocacy from teachers and administrators who realized that my talents were not academic but instinctively artistic. They could see that not all students fit a cookie-cutter assembly line form when it came to receiving a High School education and that my goals and dreams for furthering my secondary education in music did not necessarily puzzle piece perfectly within the curriculum of the standard student. Lucky for me.

Name three skills, ideas, or life-long tools that you have learned in your visual or performing arts classes/courses?

I am a huge proponent of stepping back and approaching any situation from a “Zen” standpoint: taking it all in from a larger perspective and combining all the little elements that so many only focus on one at a time without being able to see the entire picture. I learned this from watching Matisse drawing on the walls late in life with his famous extended paint-stick. The tip touched at a very small point, but his eye and view point encompassed the entire work as a whole at all times and never lost sight of the painting as a whole. In all forms of art it is the same. Even in cooking, a good chef will not prepare one dish at a time, but like a skilled plate-spinner, create the entire meal all at once and go from dish to dish, bringing it all together masterfully. Too many people focus their attention on one part, finish it, and move on, only to find that at the end they have a bunch of little pieces of a puzzle that not only do not fit together, but do not make a completed, understandable picture because they never took the time to step back, Zen the experience, and take it all in as they were creating it. When George Gershwin wrote, “Rhapsody in Blue” on a train from New York to Boston, even though it is made up of short little 16-bar musical vignettes, he heard the work as a whole, instantly … and that’s how we hear it. That’s how I compose and write: as a whole.

I am a different person due to my involvement in the arts because…

I never stop learning. I am fully against Academic exclusion. When I first entered into the musical world in the 1990′s, everyone greeted me with: “Where did you study? Who did you study with? Where did you get your degree?” If you didn’t answer correctly, you were not accepted. You were not seen to be worthy in their eyes. A degree was everything. Without it, you were nothing. It didn’t matter if you had talent, knew what you were talking about or if you could walk the walk or talk the talk. This disturbed me to no end. Four years of study from years eighteen to twenty-one does not and should not allow one to be seen as an expert or professional in any field. Not only that, talent can’t be taught. So, I never rest on my laurels or achievements or credentials. Fortunately we live in a day and time now that degrees, more so in music and the arts, do not speak as loudly as they did … and rightly so. One never stops learning.

If you could change any part of your arts education, what would it be?

I wouldn’t have spent so much time in the classroom. I would have hopped a train and spent it more in the concert halls … the jazz clubs … the musical theaters … the film studios … the street corners … making music rather than studying it. I’ve had all the time in the world to study music on my own time at home, but those experiences that come but once in a lifetime … those I miss most of all and feel that’s the education that can’t be taught, created or bought.

What’s the most creatively inspiring experience you remember?

All of them.

Why is making art or music and/or performing so important to you? Why can’t you live without it?

Absolutely 100% impossible to put into words. If I could, I’d be signing copies of the New York Times best-selling book right now …

Thank you Aaron for taking the time to answer these questions. I was fortunate to have Aaron as a student during his middle school years.

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MAAI at the State House

October 13, 2014

What a day!

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MAAI group Oct10Friday was a great opportunity for the Teacher Leaders from the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) to present their workshops as a “dry run” to critical friends. Fifty-eight educators traveled from all parts of Maine to participate in the day. Eighteen workshops were presented in 6 different groups to the critical friends, held in the State House and the Cross Office Building. Teachers bring students on field trips to the State House but it is not often that a group of teachers attend an all-day event there. As compared to when the legislature is in session, it was fairly quiet but that doesn’t take away from the beauty of the Capitol. The first session of the Maine Legislature was held in Maine’s State Capitol on January 4, 1832. As many of you know the dome is presently undergoing renovations and the new copper is gleaming and a site to behold with the changing of the leaves.

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We gathered in the beautiful space used by the Council Chamber which I am certain never held that many educators. The Chamber is a segment of State Government of the leadership, a small group that is led by the President of the Senate rotating with the Speaker of the House, to make decisions that impact the entire body of the legislature. Each of the six groups participated in two morning workshops that were held where some of the Maine State Government does their daily business, the Burton Cross Office building. The groups gathered for lunch back in the State House and USMs faculty member and MAAI leadership team member Jeff Beaudry shared the findings of the survey that many of you participated in during the last week on Proficiency and  Teacher Effectiveness. (I will post the info in another blog post).

Molly Ockett Middle School Visual Art teacher Samantha Davis presents her workshop to critical friends

Molly Ockett Middle School Visual Art teacher Samantha Davis presents her workshop to critical friends

 

Marshwood Middle School art teacher and Teacher Leader Amy Cousins participating in Teaching Artist Randy Fein's workshop using clay.

Marshwood Middle School art teacher and Teacher Leader Amy Cousins participating in Teaching Artist Randy Fein’s workshop using clay.

 

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Raymond Elementary School music teacher and veteran MAAI Teacher Leader Patti Gordan assists Ellsworth Elementary Middle School music teacher and new Teacher Leader Frances Kellogg with her workshop.

In the afternoon the groups participated in one more workshop and gathered for the wrap-up where the group facilitators provided an overview of what took place in their groups. Phase 4 music Teacher Leaders Kate Smith and Cynthia Keating lead us in song called “We Are One” and adapted for MAAI. It was a worthwhile day for all involved. The Teacher Leaders will tweak their workshops to ready them for the Mega-regional workshops being presented in five locations this year (listed below). Registration will be available soon if you are interested and able to attend please mark your calendars!

USM faculty and MAAI Leadership team member Jeff Beaudry shares the data recently collected from the survey all Maine arts educators were invited to participate in.

USM faculty and MAAI Leadership team member Jeff Beaudry shares the data recently collected from the survey all Maine arts educators were invited to participate in.

A GREAT BIG THANK YOU to the critical friends who participated in the day!

Mega-regional workshops 2014-15 school year

  • Tuesday, November 25 Mount Desert Island High School
  • Friday, March 6 Aroostook county
  • Friday, March 13 Oxford Hills Middle School South Campus
  • Thursday, April 2 UMaine, Orono
  • Friday, April 3 University of Southern Maine, Portland
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Critical Friends participate in movement workshop led by Teaching Artist John Morris in the rotunda in the State House while former Governor John Baldacci looks on.

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MAAI Leadership Team member Catherine Ring provides an overview from her groups workshops.

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Wrap up on Critical Friend Day at the State House.

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New teacher leaders and music teachers Kate Smith, Central Elementary School and Cynthia Keating, Village Elementary School lead the group in song.

 

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Brewer Performing Arts Center

September 25, 2014

Student Opportunity

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 5.19.25 AMPerforming at the Brewer Performing Arts Center on October 7 is GRAMMY award winning, world class saxophone player Eric Marienthal.  It will be an incredible, once in a lifetime experience.  He will present a masterclass at 4 PM (only $5 per person!) and a concert at 7 PM with the Maine All Star Big Band ($10 a ticket).  They are offering a special deal to schools if you purchase tickets before the event;  for every 10 tickets purchased, you get one free!  We can accept school purchase orders (the payment needs to be received before October 6).

Please email Lanissa Nadeau for more information at lnadeau@breweredu.org or call the box office at 207-200-5447.  www.brewerperformingarts   www.ericmarienthal.com

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