Archive for the ‘Standards Based Education’ Category

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MAEA Awardees

April 22, 2014

Honoring our colleagues

Nothing like the opportunity to honor and celebrate the good work of arts educators! Congratulations to Allison, Jennifer, Brian, Janie, and Jenny!

Allison

Allison Price – Maine’s 2014 Art Educator of the Year

Allison’s passion, along with educating and creating art are quality art shows. Chair of the MAEA Member Exhibitions, Allison is prime to share her gifts. Exhibitions occur every year with some multiple opportunities taking advantage of varying locations. Allison is a true collaborator working with other dedicated volunteers and location staff ensuring that the experience is as committed to a professional experience as we are committed to our practice. Sharing what Maine Art Educators do inside and outside of the classroom studio, including the blending of exhibition, education and all the benefits that provide opportunities to share practice beyond theory.

Allison is a committed Brunswick High School art educator. The work exhibited in her classroom studio, school and collegial sharing opportunities reflects a talented educator with a strong ability to work with young student artists to produce artworks with evidence of inquiry and quality. Allison is passionate, friendly, professional and always available to help. She is genuine, highly trained in her field and devoted. Devoted to art education, art making, art exhibitions, and her colleagues! A grand slam. Congratulations Allison!

 

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Jennifer Merry – Maine’s 2014 High School Art Educator of the Year

Jennifer Merry has taught visual art at Thornton Academy for 28 years. Innovative, creative, and a caring educator, she has a natural ability to lead by example in the classroom, guiding students toward their own art-related accomplishments.
Jennifer is an artist who inspires us all to be better people. One of Jennifer’s true gifts is her compassion for others. Her classroom is a joyous, safe, inviting place where students can summon their creativity and become an artist on a whole new level.

She currently teaches Painting, Drawing, Illustration, and Visual Art I. She also co-teaches an after-school class for female students called Sailing through Girlhood. She is the TA Art Club Advisor, Co-Founder and Member of the Permanent Art Collection Committee, and Co-Founder and Member of Cinderella’s Closet, which recycles dresses for students in need. She currently Chairs the Mentor Support Team, a group of trained faculty that assist new teachers.

She is a painter, draftswoman, and photographer whose work has been exhibited in local art exhibits. Jennifer lives in Kennebunkport with her husband John and she has two sons, Johnny and Charlie. She also teaches Sunday School at South Congregational Church in  Kennebunkport.

 

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Jane Snider – Maine’s 2014 Maine Middle Level Art Educator of the Year

Ms. Janie Snider is truly one of the best. Janie knows how to engage learners while simultaneously addressing educational standards; reads professionally and attends educational seminars; and continues to grow as a teacher and leader in her field. She has conducted several teacher workshops demonstrating how to unpack the Maine Learning Results Visual Arts Standards.

During her tenure at Hancock Grammar School, Ms. Snider has involved fifth grade students in the Schoodic International Sculpture Symposium, a program designed to bring artists from Maine and around the world to sculpture a single piece of public art from Maine granite.  This field trip reaches across the curriculum as it encompasses art, writing, science, social studies, and math which aligned with the Maine Learning Results, Visual and Performing Arts Standards.

Ms. Snider involves parents and community members through her thoughtful and creative projects. Soup for the Soul, involves students from grades 6-8 sold during the benefit, proceeds going toward a charitable cause for a community member who suffered from ALS.

Because Ms. Snider is explicitly thoughtful about her classroom practices, her students learn to do art well. She simply knows how to bring out the best in her students, and … isn’t that really what good teaching is all about?

 

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Brian McPherson – Maine’s 2014 Elementary Art Educator of the Year

Brian McPherson is remarkable. While he is truly a committed visual art educator of the highest caliber he is also an advocate for good teaching, good learning, and good outcomes for people of all types across all situations:  students, colleagues, parents, and educators.

Brian is dedicated to his students’ art, his drive to showcase their creativity on the school walls, in district level buildings, in local community venues, art museums and galleries, and even the State House in Augusta. He is driven to improve himself and his practice. He was supported by his school district to earn National Board Teacher Certification in 2007, the first elementary art teacher in the state to earn the honor. His professional life has taken him to various parts of Europe, Southeast Asia and China, where what he brings back are not merely cultural artifacts, but inspiration for what’s next in his curriculum development.

As a member of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative he has been a conference presenter and curriculum developer for the Resource Bank. His work has been recognized and selected to be part of a video series highlighting Standards Based Art Education at the Elementary Level.  A true career professional art educator, Brian’s Principal, Rick Dedek II states, “Brian is one of the best teachers I have ever known.”

 

Jennifer Kowtko- PORTRAIT

Jennifer Kowtko – Maine’s 2014 Higher Education Art Educator of the Year

Jenny is a 2013 graduate of the Maine College of Art Masters of Art in Teaching program. She also holds a BFA in Illustration from Syracuse University, where she graduated summa cum laude.

Jenny has over a decade of freelance illustration and other work experience, which has given her a wealth of professional experiences that she is able to draw upon in her teaching. Since graduating from MECA, Jenny has spent the current school year as a long-term sub at Windham Primary School and most recently at Kennebunk High School, where she will finish out the duration of the year teaching Art Foundations, Painting, and I.B. (International Baccalaureate) Visual Art.

A New Jersey native, Jenny has been proud to call Portland, Maine her home for the last 11 years. She is grateful for the wisdom and generosity of her own mentors, coworkers, and former teachers, the love and support of her husband Brian, and the undying loyalty of her adopted cattle dog. With great enthusiasm and anticipation, Jenny is currently seeking an art teacher position for the coming school year.

 

 

 

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Pam Kinsey Blog Post

April 21, 2014

Aroostook county Music educator Pam Kinsey makes a statement!

The following post was contributed by K-12 music educator Pam Kinsey who teaches in Easton, Maine. Easton is in Aroostook county, about a 20 minute drive east of Presque Isle. There are several arts educators in Maine who teach K-12, many in rural areas. The Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) makes a commitment to all arts educators in Maine providing professional development opportunities for rural, urban, and everything in between. Pam has served on the MAAI leadership team for 2 years representing Maine Music Educators Association. The leadership team is thrilled that Pam will be attending the New England Summit on Arts Education at USM, July 29, 30, 31 and August 1. This is Pam’s first summer joining the professional development opportunity and we all hope that you can join us as well!

IMG_3233How to write a blog post? I guess you just start to write down your thoughts. Are you part of a small or rural school system? Are you a department of one? What do you think when they say (for professional development days):  ‘We are going to work by department” and you think ‘hmmmm….me, myself and I—again. What if you could be part of a team? Perhaps develop curriculum and rubrics, lesson plans and grading strategies with others from your discipline? Tackle standards-based learning outcomes with someone who has the same struggles and celebrations that you encounter on a daily basis? The Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) probably has something for you! For many years (over 20!)

I have been a department of one. The neighboring town now has a music department of one and the communities two over from my district each have music departments of one. What a great idea if we could all collaborate to create meaningful instruction that aligns at least with one another as we pore over new curriculum expectations and standards-based outcomes? Often, our populations are transitory and some students travel freely from district to district, depending on a parent’s current situation. I, for one, would love to avoid the gaps that all of this moving can create for students, as well as a seamless flow of curriculum through the grade levels for students that don’t move around. I would like to do this in a group of more than one!

The MAAI is responding to feedback and offering the ‘New England Summit on Arts Education’ this summer, July 29, 30, 31, USM, Portland, and it has opportunities for individuals and teams to work together to problem solve these and other aspects of teaching and learning for our students in the arts. I already have a few choices in mind of other music educators that I can contact and I can only hope that they will share my interest. If not, I know that when I attend I will still find others who share my concerns and attitudes toward wanting to provide the best education in the arts that I can and these people will become part of my learning community. Either way I am sure it will be a win-win opportunity for my students and for me!

IMG_2908For more information on the New England Summit please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/NESummit#. Registration is now open with an early bird discount for those who register by May 30. The Summit is being customized to meet your needs. There is a team discount for those who register with at least from a district. The team strand is not only open to PreK-12 district Visual and Peforming Arts teachers and classroom teachers, but also to administrators, teaching artists, community cultural organizations or institute members, parents, and/or school board members. Check out the link above to learn more.

If you are interested in joining the MAAI as a teacher leader please attend the 3-day Summit and the additional day for teacher leaders only, August 1. If you have questions about the Summit and/or being a teacher leader, please contact Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Lisa’s Room

April 16, 2014

Madison Elementary School

Not to long ago I had the privilege of visiting Lisa Ingraham’s art classroom at Madison Elementary School. Lisa teaches K-5 students and her room certainly reflects her love of teaching but more importantly it is arranged for student success. The colors, organization, age appropriate visuals, and every detail is about the age of her students. Her lessons were spot-on incorporating literacy in multiple ways that enhance the visual art curriculum.

IMG_4012Not only was her classroom amazing but the school was alive with artwork. Every hallway, outside of every classroom she had shown evidence of a standards-based art environment. With each display, an explanation of the lesson.

IMG_4040IMG_4041Debi Lynne Baker and I were visiting to video tape Lisa in action for one of the 8 videos that the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative is creating as a resource for educators. It was a pleasure to meet and speak with Lisa’s colleagues as they articulated what Lisa does in her standards-based classroom and why her students are fortunate to have her as a teacher. Not only are her students fortunate but we heard multiple times how fortunate the community is as well.

IMG_4077One favorite part of the visit for me was learning about the book called “Mouse Paints”. If you teach early elementary school and color mixing it is a book that I highly recommend. As a follow-up to our visit Lisa was asked to present to the school board. Her information was very well received!

Lisa became involved in the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative during phase 3 and has served as a Teacher Leader. She is also the secretary of the Maine Art Education Association. Last Saturday she facilitated a round table discussion on Teacher Effectiveness and Evaluation. MAEA is writing a position paper on the topic so the information that art teachers shared was very helpful in that endeavor.

IMG_4028Thank you to Lisa for the opportunity and for the important work you do each day providing a quality arts education for the students of Madison Elementary School.

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Another Teacher’s Story: Patti Gordan

April 15, 2014

Raymond Elementary School music educator

This is the sixth blog post for 2014 and the third phase of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative of this series sharing arts teachers’ stories. This series contains a set of questions to provide the opportunity for you to learn from and about others. I had the pleasure of visiting Patti’s classroom last week; grade 5 and 6 strings and kindergarten general music class. It was a wonderful morning. I was reminded of the combination of skills it takes to be an elementary music teacher. The fast pace of the class, the attention to the needs of small children, and the energy level is truly amazing. All of this with music learning at the heart!

IMG_3609Patti Gordan has been teaching for 31 years, the past 30 of those years in Raymond.  For the last four years Raymond has been part of RSU#14, Windham/Raymond, so she now also teaches in Windham. During her 31 years she has taught K-8, General Music, Chorus, Band and Orchestra.  Her present assignment is K-4 General Music, 3rd/4th Grade Chorus and 5th & 6th Grade Orchestra. Patti is teaching approximately 350 students.

What do you like best about being a music educator?

 I love watching my students’ faces light up when they are feeling the joy of expressing themselves through music.  I love their enthusiasm and their eagerness. Music means everything to me and I love sharing that with my students.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

The most important key to success is be passionate about teaching and to continually improve my craft. I am always striving to learn. The second key to success is to have “decision makers” (administration, parents, school board) who are committed to providing best practice in arts education for our students. The third key to success is to have the time and resources necessary to provide best practice.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Before I began authentic, individual assessment of my students’ singing skills in General Music class I assumed that most of my students could match pitch in their full singing range. After all, when I listened to the class as a group it sounded pretty good. When I started assessing them individually I was shocked to discover that approximately 25% of my students were carrying the rest of the class. I started using these individual assessments to inform my instruction and also started having the students do self-assessments of their singing skills so that they could make their own plan for improvement. The percentage of students who can match pitch in their full singing range has risen to 85% by the end of 3rd grade.  I have expanded these methods to assessing their beat/rhythm skills and literacy skills as well.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the arts assessment initiative?

It has been very exciting to meet other arts educators with the same passion for improving their teaching and assessment methods. I have loved bouncing ideas off of the other teacher leaders and I come away with new energy and enthusiasm every time we meet.

What are you most proud of in your career?

I guess I’m most proud of always wanting to learn more about being a music teacher. I’ve never felt like I know all I need to know. If ever I’ve begun to feel that way I’ve always then gained a bit more wisdom to realize I still don’t know what I’m doing. I am also proud of helping 30+ years of students experience the joy of music. I now teach many children of former students and I am so happy when I hear those parents share fond memories of music class and when they express their happiness that I will be teaching their children.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

I get frustrated when I hear lip service that the arts are just as important as math and ELA, that they’re “CORE,” but then are not treated as equal. The truth is that there is no way that any K-4 General Music teacher, no matter how expert, can give students a true, standards-based music education, using the Maine Learning Results or the new Common Core Standards, in 45 minutes per week.

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

From 2000 to 2010 I worked with a group of teachers and administrators at my schools that were dedicated to providing quality arts education programs to students in Raymond, through sufficient class time, resources and optimal schedules.  By 2010 students had music class twice a week for 45 minutes in grades K & 1, and 5 through 8, and once a week for 45 minutes plus a 30-minute chorus rehearsal, during the school day, for grades 3 and 4, and a remedial singing class in addition to their regular 45-minute General Music class for 2nd graders who were having trouble finding their head voice or matching pitch. Sadly, since consolidation, some of that has been chipped away.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Keep learning! It’s the best way to stay fresh, prevent teacher burnout and give your kids the best possible experience.  Also, keep trying to make little improvements in your program. It can be overwhelming to look at your program as it is and think of what it should be. Plug away, bit by bit to improve the students’ experience and before you know it, 30 years later, your program will have grown by leaps and bounds!

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

Too bad you can’t buy time. I’d get my masters degree, buy a bunch of small violins to give my 3rd or 4th graders a “pre-orchestra” experience, buy more puppets for General Music class (you can never have enough puppets.), buy some additional technology for the music room, pay some bills and take some trips (Scotland, Germany, camp across America).

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

No. If you can’t fix it, regrets are a waste of time. Learn from the experience and don’t’ make the same mistakes again.  Make new ones.

I’ll probably be one of those little old ladies who gives music lessons and home baked cookies.

 

 

 

 

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Webinar Archive CC and the Arts

April 11, 2014

April’s MAAI Webinar

This post was provided by music educator Rob Westerberg.

The second of a series of four webinars for phase 3 of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative was held on Tuesday, April 8, entitled “Common Core and The Arts”. Catherine Ring and I facilitated what ended up being a pretty full hour with guests Marcia McCaffrey, Arts Consultant at the New Hampshire Department Of Education, and Jenni Null, Fine Arts Coordinator in S.A.D. #61. The dialogue focused around three broad topics:

  1. what is the Common Core and what are it’s origins,
  2. how does it tie in to Visual and Performing Arts, and
  3. how do we confront authentic concerns and questions we have around it all?

A focal point of the webinar was a resources page on which we provided live links (those links are still live in the archived webinar, which you can access at the end of this blog post) to abundant information on the Common Core, practical connections to the Arts and yet even more links that can assist Arts teachers, informing their work at integrating Common Core. As those links were shown, we had a rich conversation that included articulating the difference between “enrichment” and authentic integration. We also spent time addressing specific concerns from the field, stating that some have been coerced into sacrificing their own work to accommodate ELA prompts and increase math achievement scores. Others have had their face time with students slashed so those students can receive remedial help in other subjects. Rather than skirt these issues, confronting them head on brought about many insights and ideas for moving forward.

It became apparent that the issues we confront here in Maine have less to do with the Common Core than practical implementation of them in local controlled school districts. In short, it is evident that the Common Core standards hold many promises for all of us in Maine, including the potential for exciting collaborative work in the Arts. But implementation of this requires much prep work and a commitment to ideals that squarely place the focus on students, not programs. Successful implementation will require “intentionality” and school leadership where a broad understanding of how the arts appropriately contribute to the Common Core is present.  There is not only a place for the Arts at the table, but the scenario exists in which we potentially play a larger role than ever before in the development of our students in the 21st Century.

As Marcia McCaffrey pointed out, the College Board has come out with a Review of Connections Between the Common Core and National Core Arts Standards Conceptual Framework and specific ways to approach alignment.  Marcia provided an overview of this research which will be posted at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Webinars in the near future.

On Wednesday, May 7, we will be holding our third webinar in which we will be discussing how the Arts are impacted by the Maine law mandating Proficiency in all subject areas – including the Arts – and what that will look like for us as we move forward. No doubt it will tie into additional Common Core topics as well as the revision of the National Core Arts Standards that will be released in early June. Please plan on joining us from 3:30 to 4:30 on that first Wednesday of May. In the meantime, you can access the archive of the April 8 webinar at http://stateofmaine.adobeconnect.com/p7qnkdt5lp2/. In the near future along with Marcia’s presentation there will be a Meeting Plan which you can use individually or with your colleagues, along with additional information on the Maine Arts Commission website at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Webinars.

 

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March Webinar Overview

March 28, 2014

Facilitated by Catherine and Rob

This was written by York High School music educator and Maine Arts Assessment Initiative leadership team member Rob Westerberg as a follow-up to the webinar held on March 5.

RobCatherineStatewide confOct11On Wednesday March 5th, Catherine Ring and I facilitated the first of four MAAI sponsored Webinars for 2014. This one was on “Outreach and Arts Education Leadership”. We were joined by guests Shannon Campell, visual arts educator from Ellsworth High School, Pam Kinsey, music educator for the Easton schools, and by Argy Nestor, Director of Arts Education from the Maine Arts Commission. After tying up a few technology blips, we ended up having a great fifty minute dialogue around the primary topics of the day:

  • What is “outreach” as it pertains to the arts?
  • What does “leadership” in the arts look like?
  • How has the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative worked to develop both outreach and leadership?
  • Why are outreach and leadership essential?
  • Implications and next steps for Maine’s Arts educators

Takeaways were many, but the essence of the broad message is that we have to be proactive, not reactive as we move forward in Arts Education in Maine, and many ideas, strategies and approaches are at our fingertips for doing so. Along those lines, we have put together a pair of meeting plans that you can implement with your colleagues during professional development days in your own schools and districts. Be sure to utilize these if you are looking for professional development ideas or an alternate agenda item for your own district’s Inservice Day; bring your colleagues together and use the webinar archive and the meeting plan to help lead the discussion.

To access the webinar archive: http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Webinars
To access the meeting plan for this session:

The next Webinar will take place on Tuesday, April 8th from 3:30 to 4:30 as Catherine and I dig deeper into “Visual and Performing Arts and the Common Core”. More details and instructions on how to log in will be made available shortly. Please be sure to join us if you can for a topic that certainly impacts us all.

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Brian’s Room

March 17, 2014

Standards-based classroom videos

IMG_4009It was great to have a chance to visit art teacher and Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) Teacher Leader Brian McPherson’s classroom at the Woodside Elementary School in Topsham. Debi Lynne Baker and I traveled there recently to video tape Brian “in action”. The school is very welcoming with artwork everywhere.

Our day was filled with interviews with Brian and parents and colleagues, including principal Richard Dedek. The highlight was talking with students and visiting Brian’s classes. One class was drawing vessels using giant Chinese containers for models.

At the conclusion of the day there was a reception for students and families celebrating Chinese New Year and most importantly to view the clay relief sculptures based on Chinese architecture. Kudos to the students and Brian for a wonderful exhibit. Marvelous!

Debi Lynne is busy editing the hours of video footage to create another video showing standards-based arts education as a part of the resources provided by MAAI. All the videos that are available are posted on the Maine ARTSEducation YouTube channel. To learn more and view the videos please go to https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-VIDEOS.

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What is Proficiency-Based Education?

March 13, 2014

Maine Department of Education resources on Proficiency-Based education and Standards

Screen shot 2014-03-09 at 9.53.10 PMThe information below can be found by clicking on this link or on the title of this section.

http://maine.gov/doe/proficiency/about/proficiency-based.html

What is Proficiency-Based Education?

Proficiency-based education refers to any system of academic instruction, assessment, grading and reporting that is based on students demonstrating mastery of the knowledge and skills they are expected to learn before they progress to the next lesson, get promoted to the next grade level or receive a diploma. In Maine, academic expectations and “proficiency” definitions for public-school courses, learning experiences, content areas and grade levels are outlined in the Maine Learning Results which includes the Guiding Principles, expectations for cross-disciplinary skills and life-long learning, and eight sets of content-area standards, including the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics.

The general goal of proficiency-based education is to ensure that students acquire the knowledge and skills that are deemed to be essential to success in school, higher education, careers and adult life. If students struggle to meet minimum expected standards, they receive additional instruction, practice time and academic support to help them achieve proficiency, but they do not progress in their education until expected standards are met.

The information below can be found by clicking on the link or on the word Standard.

http://www.maine.gov/doe/proficiency/standards/index.html?utm_source=Maine+Department+of+Education&utm_campaign=aa95a68366-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21283d239d-aa95a68366-216954057

Standards

A critical component of any proficiency-based education system is a clearly articulated set of learning standards that define what students are expected to know and be able to do. The following set of resources provides support for schools to identify and align standards in a proficiency-based system.

  • Standards in a Proficiency-Based EducationA description of the role standards play in a proficiency-based diploma.
  • Maine’s Guiding Principles. A link to the Guiding Principles and the five standards for the Guiding Principles. In 2018 students are required to demonstrate proficiency of the five standards of the Guiding Principles.
  • Eight Content Areas of the Maine Learning Results. A link to the eight content areas. These content standards include career and education development, English language arts, health education and physical education, mathematics, science and technology, social studies, visual and performing arts, and world languages. Schools are required to provide a program of instruction aligned to  the eight content areas. In 2018 students are required to demonstrate proficiency in the standards of the eight content areas.
  • The Proficiency-Based Learning Simplified (PBLS) Model. A model showing the relationship among the Guiding Principles, the content standards, performance indicators and unit-based learning objectives.
  • Sample Content Area  Reporting Standards. A set of example content-area reporting standards and performance indicators. These examples show one way that schools can organize content area standards to report proficiency of the standards for the purposes of awarding a proficiency-based diploma.
  • Standards Resources. A set of design criteria, protocols and other resources for creating content area reporting standards.
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Mega-regional Workshop at USM

March 11, 2014

March 7 – in Lisa Ingraham’s words…

On Friday I attended the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) Mega-Regional workshop at USM, this time as a participant rather than a teacher leader. I got to take it all in without a focus on preparing for my own workshop. I met many arts educators I haven’t had the opportunity to spend time with before, quite a few with a similar elementary visual arts background. And I finally got to attend other teacher leaders’ workshops that I have been dying to see since first hearing about them at last summer’s MAAI Institute!

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MAAI teacher leaders Amy Cousins, Jennie Driscoll, Brian McPherson

There were a couple of big take-aways from the day for me. The first was as a result of Amy Cousins’ workshop “From Overwhelmed to in Control: Power Standards Help Connect the Dots”. Before the session was over I began mentally planning for when I could really dive into power standards (most likely this summer), and I realized that while I have done a substantial amount of work around the what, why, and how of assessment since the MAAI Institute, it is an ongoing process. While “ta das!” regarding student learning should be celebrated, as a life-long learner I then look toward the next step. Thanks Amy for showing me the next step!

My second take-away was as a result of another participant’s comment that when she thinks about her curriculum, she considers what she would like her students to know and be able to do as adults. This changed my view of the art curriculum from the five years I get to spend with them from kindergarten through grade four and extended it ahead into the future. It left me with the question, “What kind of relationship would I like my students to have with the visual arts as grown-ups?”

100_3166Time with visual and performing arts teachers is always creatively well spent. The day was filled with questions and answers both small and large. I look forward to the Mega-Regional workshop April 11th at the University of Maine, Orono!

THANK YOU Madison Elementary School and Maine Arts Assessment Initiative teacher leader Lisa Ingraham for contributing to the Maine Arts Education blog!

For more information and to register for the April 11 workshop at UMaine, Orono please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Mega-Regionals-Orono#orono

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New England Summit on Arts Education

January 21, 2014

MAAI

Screen shot 2014-01-21 at 5.26.49 AMPhase 4 of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) will include extended professional development. More information will be available at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/NESummit# as it becomes available. You’re invited to attend….

New England Summit on Arts Education

July 29, 30, 31, August 1, 2014

USM, Portland

$300 for 3 days, day 4 is optional for those interested in being a teacher leader for additional cost

Cost includes access to arts education learning, continental breakfast, lunch & snacks

Contact hours, CEUs, or Graduate credit available

The New England Summit on Arts Education will provide an outstanding opportunity for educators to dig deep into teaching, learning, and assessment in arts education. Please join educators from Maine and beyond for this fabulous 3-day professional development opportunity.

The Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) was established in 2011 and has been responding to the needs of arts education ever since. The overall focus of the MAAI has been to create an environment in Maine where assessment in arts education is an integral part of the work all arts educators do to improve teaching and learning, and student achievement in the arts.

MAAI has provided professional development during the last three summers to Maine arts educators who wish to take on a leadership role and create a workshop to present to arts teachers across the state. The initiative has been building capacity by training arts educators on the “what” and “how” of arts assessment and finding the balance of formative and summative assessment, so they can provide the leadership in Maine through professional development opportunities.

During the next phase of the MAAI the goals will expand in response to teacher feedback and is offering a 3 or 4-day summit. The summit is designed to meet the needs of teachers and the workshops will be on such important topics as proficiency, standards-based, student-centered, leadership, advocacy, creativity, 21st century skills and much more.

There will be multiple opportunities for networking as we broaden our knowledge in arts education. The Summit is a perfect opportunity for those who want to learn the core principles or advance further into the Arts Assessment field.

Participants will be able to choose one of three strands based on experience.

Strand # 1 – Developing Teacher Leader                                                                             This strand is designed primarily for teachers (teaching artists or arts educators) who have not already been involved in the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative and would like more of a foundation in arts assessment, and connections with teaching and learning.                            This strand is also for teachers in Maine who would like to become a Teacher Leader for the MAAI. The 4th day is required to become a Teacher Leader.

Strand 1 is open to any participant (from Maine or beyond).

Strand #2 – Arts Assessment Team.                                                                                                 This strand is designed for a team to arrive with ideas that will be developed into an arts education plan to be implemented when returning to school/district. The work accomplished during the summit could be similar to Strand #1 or #3 but will be customized to the team’s needs, individualizing your team plan. Consider possibilities when forming your team. K-12 district VPA teachers, classroom teacher, an administrator, a teaching artist, community cultural organization or institute member, parent, and/or school board member.

Strand 2 is open to any team (from Maine and other states, at least 2 participants per team)

Strand # 3 – Arts Assessment in Practice Strand.                                                            This strand is designed for the individual who is ready to dig deeper into arts assessment, and connections with teaching and learning. Benchmarking, proficiency, fine tuning that perfect lesson or unit, networking with others who are in a similar place.

Strand 3 is open to anyone returning as a Teacher Leader, graduates of arts assessment courses, and anyone who feels they are ready to dig deeper into arts assessment.

Comments from Maine Arts Assessment Summer Institute participants:

  • The relationships I have developed has changed my life forever for the good and the ripple will go on for years to come!  I loved the activity about a collaborative community and glancing upon that poster throughout the time period and I will use that for my own classroom.
  • Thanks for all the hard work that was put into the planning and developing this year’s institute! I love what we do!! I am so pleased to be a part of this!!
  • Thank you for setting up this opportunity for me to really think about how I teach, and how I can expand my practice so my students can have a deeper understanding and appreciation for what they learn in the art program.

Comment about the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative from a Teacher Leader:

  • There are not enough words to describe how appreciate I am of this initiative.  It has made me a better teacher and has made a difference in my students art education.
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