Posts Tagged ‘maine art education association’

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MAEA Exhibit Opening

October 16, 2014

Friday night

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Maine College of Art (MECA) is hosting the fall exhibit of the Maine Art Education Association (MAEA). The opening reception for “Reap and Sow” is Friday, October 17 – 5:00 – 7:30 p.m.

I had the chance to see the show last week and it is spectacular! Congratulations to MAEA members and thank you to MAEA and MECA for providing this wonderful opportunities for the members. Another great benefit of joining MAEA. For membership information please go to http://www.mainearted.org/MAEA/Home.html

 

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Day 2: Summit on Arts Ed

August 4, 2014

Another worthwhile day at the Summit provided by the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative – a program of the Maine Arts Commission

LisaThe Day 2 schedule at the Summit on Arts Education at USM, Portland allowed participants the opportunity to attend sessions on technology, integration, advocacy, and sessions with like-grade level and discipline on Proficiency and the Student-centered classroom.

In addition, throughout the morning participants had the chance to learn more about teaching artists, arts organizations and higher education.

Representatives from the following arts organizations and institutions participated: From the Bow Seat, Lesley University, Lincoln Street Center and Northland Village Foundation, Maine Department of Education, Maine Art Education Association, Maine Music Educators Association, Maine College of Art, New England Institute for Teacher Education, Portland Ovations, Portland Museum of Art, Portland Symphony Orchestra, UMaine Music Ed Department, and UMaine Art Ed Department.

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Rose Kue, Director of Education & Community Engagement, Portland Symphony Orchestra

Teams and individuals started work on an Individual (or team) Action Plan so they could hit the ground running when returning to their schools/districts. The Phase 5 Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) Teacher Leader’s Individual Action Plans focus on the workshops they plan to provide during the 2014-15 school year.

Maine Art Education Association secretary and MAAI teacher leader, Lisa Ingraham, provided the “chair” template so teachers could use their creativity to contribute to the wall of chairs. Lisa and her colleague Jim Small from Madison School District are seen in this post in front of the growing wall of chairs.

It was the second day of the Summit on Arts Education filled with high quality professional development. The 90 participants went away having learned a great deal, and with new questions about their understanding of teaching, learning, and assessment in arts education.

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Participants “movin” with teaching artist, Stephanie McGary

 

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Jeff Poulin, Arts Education Program Coordinator from the Americans for the Arts located in Washington, D.C. provided information on Arts Advocacy

Photos taken by Kevin Facer, Roger Fuller, and Argy Nestor

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Haystack Fall Conference

May 21, 2014

Getting ready!

It’s that time of year again to register for our
MAEA Fall Conference at Haystack!!!

All of the information regarding dates (September 26-28), workshops and descriptions, Haystack positions, etc. can be found on the website: http://aeforme.org/MAEA/Haystack.html

Registration opens Sunday, June 1st! You must register online through the website (a link from the website will be provided on June 1st.) There is NO paper registration option! You will have the option of paying online via Paypal or mailing in your payment to: MAEA, PO Box 10463, Portland, ME 04104.
(If you plan on sending in a check for your payment, instead of using the Paypal option, you may do so early – like right now! Once registration opens on June 1st, if your payment is in our mailbox, it will be added to the queue. Note: If it arrives early it does NOT mean it will be first in line – it will be placed in the order in which ALL materials are received – including the on-line registration! Checks need to be made out to: MAEA. The conference is $250 on-campus and $200 off-campus. Don’t forget to add payment for your 2014-2015 membership as well!)

To be clear… Your registration will be complete, and your workshop request placed in the queue, ONLY when ALL registration materials have been accounted for:

  • online registration form,
  • active membership paid for the 2014-2015 year,
  • and full payment for the conference is received!

Workshops are filled on a first come, first served basis.

The opportunity to receive CEUs will be provided this year. When you register, please indicate whether this is something you need. You will be responsible for mailing in the paperwork provided and paying for the processing (I believe it is $10).

Reminder that your active membership ends on June 30th.
If you are registering for the Fall Conference at Haystack and plan on paying via Paypal online at the time of registration, you do not need to go to the membership page and renew!!! You will pay for the conference AND membership at the same time once the conference registration opens on June 1st. However, if you do not plan on attending the fall conference, and you wish to stay an active member, the renew membership Paypal button for the 2014-1015 year is now on the website. (http://aeforme.org/MAEA/Membership.html)

If your MAEA membership is not renewed by June 30th, you will be designated as non-active and, as a result, may not receive up-to-date information or be eligible for conferences, scholarships, exhibitions, opportunities, etc. Don’t miss anything! Please join or renew today!

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MAEA Awardees

April 22, 2014

Honoring our colleagues

Nothing like the opportunity to honor and celebrate the good work of arts educators! Congratulations to Allison, Jennifer, Brian, Janie, and Jenny!

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Allison Price – Maine’s 2014 Art Educator of the Year

Allison’s passion, along with educating and creating art are quality art shows. Chair of the MAEA Member Exhibitions, Allison is prime to share her gifts. Exhibitions occur every year with some multiple opportunities taking advantage of varying locations. Allison is a true collaborator working with other dedicated volunteers and location staff ensuring that the experience is as committed to a professional experience as we are committed to our practice. Sharing what Maine Art Educators do inside and outside of the classroom studio, including the blending of exhibition, education and all the benefits that provide opportunities to share practice beyond theory.

Allison is a committed Brunswick High School art educator. The work exhibited in her classroom studio, school and collegial sharing opportunities reflects a talented educator with a strong ability to work with young student artists to produce artworks with evidence of inquiry and quality. Allison is passionate, friendly, professional and always available to help. She is genuine, highly trained in her field and devoted. Devoted to art education, art making, art exhibitions, and her colleagues! A grand slam. Congratulations Allison!

 

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Jennifer Merry – Maine’s 2014 High School Art Educator of the Year

Jennifer Merry has taught visual art at Thornton Academy for 28 years. Innovative, creative, and a caring educator, she has a natural ability to lead by example in the classroom, guiding students toward their own art-related accomplishments.
Jennifer is an artist who inspires us all to be better people. One of Jennifer’s true gifts is her compassion for others. Her classroom is a joyous, safe, inviting place where students can summon their creativity and become an artist on a whole new level.

She currently teaches Painting, Drawing, Illustration, and Visual Art I. She also co-teaches an after-school class for female students called Sailing through Girlhood. She is the TA Art Club Advisor, Co-Founder and Member of the Permanent Art Collection Committee, and Co-Founder and Member of Cinderella’s Closet, which recycles dresses for students in need. She currently Chairs the Mentor Support Team, a group of trained faculty that assist new teachers.

She is a painter, draftswoman, and photographer whose work has been exhibited in local art exhibits. Jennifer lives in Kennebunkport with her husband John and she has two sons, Johnny and Charlie. She also teaches Sunday School at South Congregational Church in  Kennebunkport.

 

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Jane Snider – Maine’s 2014 Maine Middle Level Art Educator of the Year

Ms. Janie Snider is truly one of the best. Janie knows how to engage learners while simultaneously addressing educational standards; reads professionally and attends educational seminars; and continues to grow as a teacher and leader in her field. She has conducted several teacher workshops demonstrating how to unpack the Maine Learning Results Visual Arts Standards.

During her tenure at Hancock Grammar School, Ms. Snider has involved fifth grade students in the Schoodic International Sculpture Symposium, a program designed to bring artists from Maine and around the world to sculpture a single piece of public art from Maine granite.  This field trip reaches across the curriculum as it encompasses art, writing, science, social studies, and math which aligned with the Maine Learning Results, Visual and Performing Arts Standards.

Ms. Snider involves parents and community members through her thoughtful and creative projects. Soup for the Soul, involves students from grades 6-8 sold during the benefit, proceeds going toward a charitable cause for a community member who suffered from ALS.

Because Ms. Snider is explicitly thoughtful about her classroom practices, her students learn to do art well. She simply knows how to bring out the best in her students, and … isn’t that really what good teaching is all about?

 

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Brian McPherson – Maine’s 2014 Elementary Art Educator of the Year

Brian McPherson is remarkable. While he is truly a committed visual art educator of the highest caliber he is also an advocate for good teaching, good learning, and good outcomes for people of all types across all situations:  students, colleagues, parents, and educators.

Brian is dedicated to his students’ art, his drive to showcase their creativity on the school walls, in district level buildings, in local community venues, art museums and galleries, and even the State House in Augusta. He is driven to improve himself and his practice. He was supported by his school district to earn National Board Teacher Certification in 2007, the first elementary art teacher in the state to earn the honor. His professional life has taken him to various parts of Europe, Southeast Asia and China, where what he brings back are not merely cultural artifacts, but inspiration for what’s next in his curriculum development.

As a member of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative he has been a conference presenter and curriculum developer for the Resource Bank. His work has been recognized and selected to be part of a video series highlighting Standards Based Art Education at the Elementary Level.  A true career professional art educator, Brian’s Principal, Rick Dedek II states, “Brian is one of the best teachers I have ever known.”

 

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Jennifer Kowtko – Maine’s 2014 Higher Education Art Educator of the Year

Jenny is a 2013 graduate of the Maine College of Art Masters of Art in Teaching program. She also holds a BFA in Illustration from Syracuse University, where she graduated summa cum laude.

Jenny has over a decade of freelance illustration and other work experience, which has given her a wealth of professional experiences that she is able to draw upon in her teaching. Since graduating from MECA, Jenny has spent the current school year as a long-term sub at Windham Primary School and most recently at Kennebunk High School, where she will finish out the duration of the year teaching Art Foundations, Painting, and I.B. (International Baccalaureate) Visual Art.

A New Jersey native, Jenny has been proud to call Portland, Maine her home for the last 11 years. She is grateful for the wisdom and generosity of her own mentors, coworkers, and former teachers, the love and support of her husband Brian, and the undying loyalty of her adopted cattle dog. With great enthusiasm and anticipation, Jenny is currently seeking an art teacher position for the coming school year.

 

 

 

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MAEA Awards

April 14, 2014

Several recognized!

What a pleasure it was to attend the awards presentation for the Maine Art Education Association. Last year the program changed considerably and the new tradition continues by celebrating the accomplishments and teaching excellence of several art educators with different roles. When I attend these type of events my heart swells with pride just thinking about the impact that arts educators have on the development of young people!

Below are the awards that were presented for 2014.

  • National Board Certification Recognition: Genevieve M. Keller, Windsor Elementary School, RSU 12
  • Pre-Service Student: Jennifer Kowtko, Maine College of Art
  • Elementary Art Educator of the Year: Brian D. McPherson, Woodside Elementary School, Topsham
  • Middle Level Art Educator of the Year: Janie Snider, Hancock Grammar School, RSU 24
  • Secondary Art Educator of the Year: Jennifer Merry, Thornton Academy, Saco
  • Maine Art Educator of the year, Allison Price, Brunswick High School
Brian, Allison (with Janie), Genevieve, Jennifer K, Jennifer M.

Brian, Allison (with Janie), Genevieve, Jennifer K, Jennifer M.

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High School Scholarship

April 12, 2014

Maine Art Education Association

The deadline for the high school scholarship application is May 1. Each year these awards are made after using a rubric to  Screen shot 2014-04-11 at 9.36.39 PMscore electronic artwork. Yarmouth art educator and MAEA board member serves as the Recognitions Chair. If you have questions please contact her at holly_houston@yarmouthschools.org. The information is below and the application and rubric are located at http://www.aeforme.org/MAEA/Recognitions.html.

Who may enter?

You must be:

  1. A high school senior attending a school in Maine
  2. Currently enrolled in a visual arts class
  3. Nominated by a teacher who is a current member of the Maine Art Education Association
  4. Pursuing a degree in Fine Arts or Design fields

How much is the scholarship and how is it awarded?

$500-$1,500 will be awarded directly to the student upon receipt of proof of the successful completion of the first semester of post-secondary school. The scholarship shall be forfeited if the above criteria are not met within the first year after graduating from his or her Maine High School.

How many scholarships are awarded?

Typically, one award will be presented annually. However, if the scholarship fund allows, a second award may be issued to a second qualified candidate.

What are the requirements?

  1. Personal Information Form including:
  • Contact information
  • Where you plan to go to school (2 or 4 year college or university)
  • Current GPA (un-weighted)
  • A list of high school arts classes and name of art teacher(s)
  • A list of activities, leadership, awards, and honors
  • A list of, community service and employment
  • A letter of recommendation from your nominator (current MAEA member.) Must include: Evidence strength in academics and character and Evidence of accomplishments
  • 2. An artist statement (no more than 500 words) that addresses: Your artwork: motivation, process and product and Why you wish to pursue a college degree in art
  • A disk of images including: (The disk becomes property of MAEA and will not be returned. Artist retains all copyrights to imagery.)
  • 10 jpeg images: 72dpi-2mb – labeled by title (at least two from direct observation)
  • A .doc or .rtf file with the name/title, media, and dimensions of the original work                                                        Important to note! By submitting an application you agree that images of your artwork may be used in MAEA publications, announcements, and websites.

When is the application due?

The application must be postmarked by May 1st. Metered mail is NOT eligible (meters can be turned back)

How will my entry be judged?

The MAEA High School Scholarship Rubrics can be found on the MAEA website: www.mainearted.org

How and when will I know if I was selected?

You will be notified by mail no later than June 1st.

The recipient(s) of the scholarship will be posted on the MAEA website on June 1st.

Where do I send my application?

holly_houston@yarmouthschools.org (Write: MEAE Scholarship in the subject line!) Once your information has been received you will get an email confirmation. Assume that if you do not receive confirmation, your application has not been received!

Or mail to MAEA High School Scholarship, PO Box 10462, Portland, ME 04104

Questions?
Contact Holly Houston at holly_houston@yarmouthschools.org.

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Catherine Ring: Art Advocate of the Year

March 19, 2014

Maine Art Education Association names art advocate

On Saturday, March 8 at the opening of the 20th annual Youth Art Month exhibit at the Portland Museum of Art, Catherine Ring shared the following message as she accepted the Advocate of the Year award. Catherine truly “walks the walk” of an advocate – She helped establish the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI), serves as a member of the leadership team for the MAAI, and is the executive director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education. CONGRATULATIONS Catherine!

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Catherine receiving her award from MAEA president Heidi O’Donnell

Hello, I want to tell you some stories that really made me mad. But it’s not a bad thing. Because if you are an advocate, you can turn something you’re mad about into something good. And because I’m an advocate of the arts, I like to think I can turn MAD into MADD, which stands for Music Art Dance and Drama. All of the arts.

The first is a true story that happened to me when I was in kindergarten. The teacher rolled out some big paper on the floor and had all of us get down on the floor with some crayons and draw a picture of ourselves and our houses. I drew a picture of myself with wild purple curly hair and my house was a log cabin. The teacher came over and yelled at me and said, “No! Not like that. Do it like this!” and she moved me next to another girl, who drew a picture of herself with yellow hair, and a regular house with little curtains in the windows. I remember that day, because something in me told me that this wasn’t right. Why couldn’t I live in a log cabin and have purple hair? Why did I have to do it just like the teacher said? Just like the other little girl? I was mad. I think it was that day that I decided that I would be an art teacher when I grew up.

When that little voice inside me told me that the teacher was wrong, it made me mad. When I did eventually become an art teacher, I was determined to make sure my students grew to love art and I would encourage them to be as creative as possible. That voice in my head led to action and I turned something I was mad about into something good.

Here are some other things that make me mad:
Not every kid thinks they are creative. We’ve all heard people say, ! • “Oh, I can’t draw. I’m not an artist. I can’t sing. I’m not creative.” Where did they get this idea? Aren’t all children born creative? There are many of us who believe they are. In fact, Sir Ken Robinson, who has written many books on the subject and who has spoken to audiences all around the world, believes all children are born creative, and that schools are killing creativity. He believes that we don’t grow into creativity, we are educated out of it. If that is true, that makes me mad.

If you are in a school that inspires your creativity, be very glad. But here are some realities in Maine:

  • Not every student in Maine gets Art.
  • Students don’t all get taught by qualified arts teachers.
  • Art and Music are often the first things that get cut out of school budgets.

Even though the research shows, irrefutably, that students with lots of exposure to the arts do better in all subject areas. Even though the research shows that test scores go up. Even though we know that the arts teach kids to be creative and critical thinkers, to be problem solvers and collaborators, to communicate and innovate. These are exactly the skills that are being sought after in the 21st century. So why would school leaders cut music or art? This doesn’t make sense. This makes me mad.

Catherine RingSo what do we do? How can we make a difference in our schools? How can we make people understand and support the arts in our schools? How do we help them understand that the arts are not something that’s just nice to have, or a frill, or just for fun? That the arts are absolutely essential for every child? In fact, that they are just as important as reading or math? How do we turn something that makes us mad into something good? We can get MADD.

There are a lot of things being done in Maine right now, I’m happy to say. We still have a lot of work to do, but music and art and drama and dance teachers all across Maine are making a difference through the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative. The arts teachers are making a difference in their communities through workshops in their school districts, and communities. They are making a difference by talking to their principals and parents and school boards. Arts teachers are making a difference. They are using their voices to express what they know is right, and change is beginning to happen.

So what can you do? How can you use your voice to make a difference? How can you be an advocate for more good quality arts education in our state? In every school? For every child? How do we go from being mad to being MADD? Well, here’s one way.

Because I am the Advocate of the Year, I am being asked to talk to a lot of people about how they can make a difference. I’ll be going to the state house and many other places throughout the year to advocate for the arts. I will also be writing for newsletters and other publications. But I could really use your help.

I created a new email account. maddaboutart@gmail.com. If you agree that the arts are essential for every child, in every school, please email me at this address and let me know. So, again, here’s the question:

Why is it important to have the arts in every school?
If you are a student, please write your name, your age and what school you go to. If you are an adult or a student, please send me your stories that I can then share with others. I will take all of your answers and stories to the Statehouse, and to schools and organizations around Maine. I will write about the importance of the arts in education in publications throughout the year. Our voices together will be stronger. Together we can make a difference. Let’s help everyone get MADD about art!

“We don’t need to save the arts. Instead we can save the world with the arts.”
~ John Maeda, President, Rhode Island School of Design

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