h1

Arts Education Month

March 1, 2015

Celebrate with students, family members, parents, grandparents by recognizing students

I have always felt grateful to be in the field of Arts education. I never lose sight of what my career choice is all about, and still base my decisions concerning arts education on this question: What is in the best interest of every student?  I am so encouraged by what is going on in education today – finally, the student is being moved to the center of the education circle. The shift for teachers is changing, we are no longer the ‘disseminater’ of information but we’re becoming the “guide on the side”. And, in my opinion, this is just the way school should be, (even if disseminater is not a word)!

I have always loved March because it is the time earmarked to celebrate students and the arts! It is  is Youth Art Month and Music in our Schools Month. Please send your stories about how you are celebrating Arts education and students stories about how the arts impact their lives. Either email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov or post your comments at the bottom of the blog.

Youth Art Month is a month of promoting art education in the United States. Screen Shot 2015-02-28 at 7.48.03 PMIt is observed in March, with thousands of American schools participating, often with the involvement of local art museums and civic organizations.

Started in 1961 through the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) and in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), Youth Art Month exists to:

1. Recognize art education as a viable factor in the total education curricula that develops citizens of a global society.
2. Recognize art is a necessity for the full development of better quality of life for all.
3. Direct attention to the value of art education for divergent and critical thinking.
4. Expand art programs in schools and stimulate new art programs.
5. Encourage commitment to the arts by students, community organizations, and individuals everywhere.
6. Provide additional opportunities for individuals of all ages to participate in creative art learning.
7. Increase community, business and governmental support for art education.
8. Increase community understanding and interest in art and art education through involvement in art exhibits, workshops, and other creative ventures.
9. Reflect and demonstrate the goals of the National Art Education Association that work toward the improvement of art education at all levels.

See more information at: http://www.arteducators.org/news/yam

The information above is from the National Art Education Association.

In addition, March is Music In Our Schools Month

MIOSM LOGOThis a great time to highlight the importance of  comprehensive, sequential music education taught by exemplary music educators for all through concerts, lessons, and public performances and advocacy activities. Yes, we know that these are things that should be happening day in and day but this will help you to remember to pay closer attention to your students who are participate. March has been officially designated by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) for the observance of Music In Our Schools Month (MIOSM®), the time of year when music education becomes the focus of schools across the nation. MIOSM began as a single statewide celebration in 1973, and has grown over the decades to encompass a day, then a week, and then in 1985 to become a month long celebration of school music. The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that school is where all children should have access to music. MIOSM is an opportunity for music teachers to bring their music programs to the attention of the school and the community and to display the benefits school music brings to students of all ages.

See more information at http://musiced.nafme.org/events/music-in-our-schools-month/what-is-miosm/.

This information taken from the National Association for Music Education.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: