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Haystack

September 19, 2017

MAEA Fall Conference

Almost 100 visual art educators traveled to Deer Isle Maine for the annual 3-day conference. Some had to drive 5 hours to get there. When I reach the bridge over to the island and smell the salt air and see the seabirds flying, I know whoever has made the long trip, doesn’t question its worth. The conference is held at the beautiful Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and sponsored by the Maine Art Education Association (MAEA). The organization stands on the shoulders of giants and many of those names were mentioned over the weekend.

MALI Teacher Leaders

THANK YOU

A HUGE THANK YOU to Carolyn Brown for chairing the conference and to all of the Maine Art Education board members and the organization members who volunteer to do the hours of work to make the conference so wonderful!

HIGHLIGHTS

  • A GREAT learning opportunity
  • Delicious food
  • Beautiful environment
  • Opportunity to meet art teachers from across the state
  • Amazing people who are open to sharing, exchanging ideas, and providing support
  • A wonderful feeling of community

Yes, that is guacamole

Comments

  • The opportunity to learn is amazing; like no other that I have
  • I get to feel what my students feel while learning something new
  • I look around and wonder if my art is good enough and I remember we’re all in this together
  • What an opportunity to push my limits
  • I’m learning at full speed
  • Now I can go back to my school feeling totally nourished

Workshop offerings

  • Expanding Your Fiber Universe: Lissa Hunter

  • Block Printmaking – Balance and Texture: Holly Berry

  • Exploring the Basics of BronzClay Jewelry Fabrication: Nisa Smiley

  • Visual Journaling: Sandy Weisman

  • Making Animal Sculptures with Clay using Enclosed Forms and Additions: Tim Christensen

  • Bringing Digital Fabrication into your Curriculum: Elliot Clapp

  • Experimental Watercolor Painting: Erica Qualey

  • Past to Present: Personal Found Object Assemblage Inspired by Shrines, Alters, and Reliquaries: Stephanie Leonard and Suzanne Southworth

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