Archive for the ‘assessment’ Category

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New England Institute

June 7, 2019

Summer courses

Sign Up Now for Summer 2019 Courses!
Get a jumpstart on your recertification requirements, work with a team on an online course, get a new endorsement or just get some great refreshers on best teaching practices, pre-K – 12. All courses are approved by the Maine Department of Education for 4.5 CEUs.
There are courses on:
Literacy for Children & Adolescents
Gifted and Talented
Google Suite 101
Teaching the Exceptional Child
Teaching Children with Autism
Teaching Children of Poverty
Music Assessment
Maine Writers
Critical and Creative Thinking and more!
Our new website makes finding a course and registering easy. Online summer courses begin in late June, early July.
For more information, visit our website.
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Visit to Wyoming

May 22, 2019

Amazing opportunity

Mary and I at the Wyoming Arts Council

I am so grateful to have traveled to Wyoming last week. I went for two main purposes – one to sit on the arts education grant panel for the Wyoming Arts Council and the second to attend the connect2women conference, especially to attend a session provided by Mary Billiter. Mary is the Arts Education Specialist at the Wyoming Arts Council. I love the Council’s slogan: Grow – Connect – Thrive.

During my almost six years as the director of arts education at the Maine Arts Commission I have been fortunate to mentor two other state arts agency arts education directors. Both have provided me with opportunities to reflect on the work that I view as so important to quality arts education in our schools and communities throughout the state and country. And, is often the case, I have learned so much and have been grateful for the chance to interact with two amazing women! Now, they are not only colleagues but friends.

Denver airport looks like a giant sculpture

It was fascinating to see ‘close up’ how another state coordinates their arts education grant panel. I have read about how other states run their panels and talked with other directors about the process but experiencing the process was much different. It gave me the chance to pause, reflect, and learn.

The panel of 8 traveled from all over Wyoming and we reviewed 53 grant applications, which is almost three times as many as are submitted in Maine. The applications received cover a wide range; PreK-through higher education institutions, arts councils, non-profit, for profit, community organizations and much more. Some of the challenges and successes the applicants face day to day are similar to what I find in Maine and some were very different. It Applicants were required to demonstrate alignment with the state’s arts standards, among other requirements. Needless to say I loved taking on the challenge and since I knew very little or nothing about the applicants and communities, in some ways the task was easier.

First Lady Jennie Gordon

Attending the connect2women conference was a real gift. Kate Debow Hayes serves as the executive director and is the energy behind the work that the organization has underway. It is their fourth conference and the first as a non-profit. Each year the conference grows as people learn about the opportunity.

The speakers, presenters and workshops were varied and interesting. Mary’s workshop was called “Writing Your Online Presence” and it was useful on many levels. From writing emails to formal and informal letters to requesting face to face meetings and much more – I was reminded of how important communication is on a variety of levels. The room was packed with about 50 people. Mary Billiter is the award-winning author of the highly acclaimed resort romance series, which she wrote on her cell phone while she underwent breast cancer treatment. She has a new book coming out in July. I will include a blog post tomorrow that I hope you’ll read since it covers a topic that is familiar to all of us and an important one to address as educators.

Giant boot mosaic

I attended a second workshop called “Brand Your Story” that was presented by Elizabeth Dillow who is an accomplished photographer and designer. The seeds she planted provided the chance to work on “advocacy” through a different lens. It is so fun to be presented with challenges when traveling.

One highlight of the conference was the keynote provided by Wyoming’s First Lady Jennie Gordon. She shared her story growing up with a mother who was born in Austria and coming to the states after marrying an American service man from WWII. She has 9 siblings and now grown children of her own. Her story was very inspirational.

One of the many beautiful flowers at the botanical garden

During my down-time in Wyoming I had a chance to visit some local spots. The Cheyenne Botanical Gardens was one and they are amazing. Many of you know that I create mosaics so seeing the giant boot in mosaic form was a real treat. The gardens also include 3 floors of beautiful plants, an extensive children’s garden, a rooftop garden spot, and much more. I loved seeing the tulips, the vegetables and flowers waiting to be planted from the greenhouse, the indoor/ outdoor classroom and the rooftop providing a wonderful view. While there I met an interesting 80 year old man who was retired from a career in education – teacher, principal, and superintendent – he was spending his day fishing.

The best part about being out west is how everything feels so HUGE. I landed at the Denver airport with a tent like design, the Rockies in the distance, the intense blue sky, the clouds that go from white puffy to grey rain clouds in a matter of minutes, the boots and hats, and the people who are curious and friendly! I am grateful to experience and learn so much while traveling and LOVE returning home to Maine!

Indoor/outdoor classroom in the children’s area of the botanical gardens

I’m sure many of the meartsed blog readers have been out west. If not, I recommend a trip – rent a car, drive around, stop in the local  shops, and stare at the immense sky and land. Ask the local people a question or two and let them talk about their lives.

 

 

 

 

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Teaching Artist Professional Development Workshop

April 23, 2019

Space limited

The Arts Commission is providing a one-day professional development workshop for Maine Teaching Artists.
Monday 17 June 2019
8:45 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Only 20 spots available – REGISTER TODAY
Viles Mansion/Governor Samuel Cony House, 71 Stone Street, Augusta.
$25.00. Registration is required.
Purpose
The workshop is focused on the role and benefits of a teaching artist. We will address how to structure and market a residency as well as tips for communicating and collaborating teachers,  administrators, and community arts representatives. The workshop will include resources and techniques on applying your expertise as an artist to the structure of your work as a teaching artist including communication tips, connecting standards and assessments in your lessons, promotional information, funding opportunities, messaging and much more.
Outcomes
  • Information on applying your expertise as an artist to the structuring of your lessons and residencies.
  • Hands-on experience in relating the learning standards and assessments to your work.
  • Participation in sessions that are planned to fit your specific needs as a teaching artist.
  • Promoting yourself and your work as a teaching artist
Workshop Presenters
  • Tom Luther – Teaching Artist, Musician, Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Teaching Artist Leader
  • Lindsay Pinchbeck – Arts Educator, Founder and Director Sweetland School, Hope
  • Kate Smith – Elementary music educator, Central School, South Berwick
Please note: To be eligible to apply for the Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artist Roster teaching artists must attend the one-day workshop.
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Assessment for Learning & Leading

April 16, 2019

Brain-Based Strategies to Cultivate Positive Learning Environments

USM and Southern Maine Partnership present their annual Assessment for Learning & Leading Conference, May 6-7, Portland campus in Abromson Hall. This year’s theme is Brain-Based Strategies to Cultivate Positive Learning Environments.  Featured keynoter and presenter is the brilliant and exuberant Dr. Marcia Tate

REGISTRATION

In addition to daily keynotes and breakout sessions by best-selling author Dr. Tate,  dozens of Maine educators will be presenting!
 

Dr. Marcia Tate

These educators come from a variety of schools, districts,  higher ed institutions,  and  statewide educational  organizations and represent a host of roles (e.g., k-12 teachers, instructional coaches, school administrators, central office administrators, higher ed faculty from undergraduate and graduate programs, professional development specialists, content specialists from the DOE, researchers, etc.) from a variety of content areas (e.g., social studies, literacy, math, visual and performing arts, science, leadership, teacher education, etc.). 

 
Please see the Conference Draft Program for specific session information. 
 
Session Topics include:
  • Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Instructional Strategies that Engage the Brain
  • Formative Assessment in the Brain-Compatible Classroom: How Do We Really Know They’re Learning
  • Leading the Change Process
  • Characteristics of a Brain-Compatible Classroom
  • Brain-based Strategies – Gateways to Creativity, Growth and Recovery
  • Pulling Tricks from Your Hattie
  • Making Meaning in History Using Primary Sources
  • Sit & Get Won’t Grow Dendrites: 20 Professional Learning Strategies that Engage the Adult Brain
  • Storytelling and Innovation – An Exploration in Arts Integration
  • All Aboard!! Experience The Power of Field Trips at the Osher Map Library
  • Student Involvement & Student Voice
  • Authentic Assessment:  Products and Performances for Student Success
  • Assessment Literacy Leadership & Processes for Successful Implementation
  • Sketchnoting & Visual Learning Strategies
  • Develop Surveys To Get The Data You Want
  • Escape This! Breakout Challenges in the STEM Classroom
  • Shouting Won’t Grow Dendrites: 5 Ways to Detour Around the Danger Zones
  • What Questions Do You Have? Inquiry in the Social Studies Classroom
  • Using Visualization and Infographics to Tell Your Story
  • Balancing Formative and Summative Assessment in High School Math Classroom – The Synergy of Feedback, Self-assessment and Goal Setting
This is going to be an incredible two days of learning! You and your team do not want to miss this unique learning opportunity in beautiful Portland, ME! 
Register at:

https://conferences.usm.maine.edu/attendeeonline/AutoLogin.aspx?page=new&event=2856&password=event

Jeff Beaudry & Anita Stewart McCafferty

Cost: $225 for full conference, including materials, lunches, and snacks; $125 for 1 day; $200/person for full conference for teams of 5+

Co-directors of the Southern Maine Partnership and responsible for the conference are Drs. Anita Stewart McCafferty, Assistant Professor, Department Chair and Jeff Beaudry, Associate Professor, both in the School of Education and Human Development, Educational Leadership Program.

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Teach to Lead

April 6, 2019

Great opportunity to develop ideas with your team

Many of the Maine Arts Education blog readers remember that the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) started as the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) back in 2010. In 2014 a team made up of MAAI teacher leaders and leadership team

Maine MALI team, bottom left

members were invited to attend a Teach to Lead Summit in Washington, D.C. It was an AMAZING OPPORTUNITY!! The team realized that the name of the initiative wasn’t reflecting the future work of MAAI. A focus on LEADERSHIP was clear so the members of MAAI decided to change the name to the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. Like everything we’ve done in the 8 years that the initiative has been in place it was a careful decision. It proved to be the best thing for MALI. We know that in many school districts across Maine and across the country that arts educators are leaders. They are looked to for their many skills – collaboration, problem-solving, curriculum integration, student-center learning and so much more that takes place in arts education classrooms everyday. Why wouldn’t visual and performing arts educators be asked to contribute their expertise to help move schools and school districts forward?!!

You have a chance to lead your colleagues and community to a Teach to Lead Summit. Do you have an idea that takes some intense planning and time with your colleagues? Do you want to take action around something that is needed in your school? If so, I urge you to consider taking a trip west to the next Teach to Lead Summit taking place on September 19-21, 2019 in Salt Lake City, UT. The information is below – take a look – see if you’re a good match. If you have any questions please email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

Whole Child, Whole Teacher Summit

September 19-21, 2019

Salt Lake City, UT

Calling all educators! Submit an idea for our next Teacher Leadership Summit!

Teach to Lead supports teachers as valued experts in instruction and students’ needs. Teach to Lead summits provide teams with time to collaborate, skills development, and professional consultation to incubate innovative ideas that can make a positive impact for students in their schools, communities, districts and states.

This topical summit will bring teacher leaders and other stakeholders together to address the needs of the Whole Child and Whole Teacher in an effort to transition from a focus on narrowly defined academic achievement to one that promotes the long-term development and success of all children, as well as the well-being of all teachers.

Each idea should reflect a need that addresses students’ and/or teachers’ health, safety, learning, support in and out of school, and access to engaging and challenging opportunities. Examples of project topic ideas might include:

  • Healthy: homelessness, hunger, student and teacher well-being and mental health
  • Safe: school safety, bullying and harassment
  • Engaged: cultural diversity, student identity, school culture and climate, professional networking
  • Supported: supports for a diverse teacher workforce, coaching and peer mentoring, adult-student relationships, community partnerships, language services and supports
  • Challenged: access to challenging coursework or professional development, access to extracurricular opportunities, etc.

How do participants benefit from the Summit?

  • Develop a local idea for change into a complete plan
  • Obtain the support of a dedicated “critical friend” from a supporting organization to advance your work
  • Build relationships with ASCD, Teach Plus, the United States Department of Education, and national supporting organizations
  • Be provided with free registration and hotel accommodations for two nights or parking ( hotel will be provided free of charge for teams traveling more than 50 miles; parking will be provided for teams traveling 50 miles or fewer to the summit).

Who may submit an idea application?

  • Any teacher leader with an actionable idea is encouraged to apply here (or cut and paste into your browser) https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/TTLSLC19 by 11:59 pm ET on May 17, 2019 . Accepted ideas will be notified the week of June 10th.
  • Teams must have 3-5 members and must be led by one current teacher. Other key stakeholders (e.g. parent, student, community members, school and government officials) are encouraged.

All submitted ideas must: 

  • Encourage teachers to lead from the classroom.
  • Promote collaborative work among multiple stakeholders.
  • Identify an area in need of innovation or a specific problem with an eye towards actionable solutions.
  • Be viable in the local context and sustainable over time.

All submitted ideas may:

  • Be functioning at any stage of development – an emerging idea requiring input and buy-in to something that has been implemented which is ripe for improvement or expansion.
  • Focus on any level of change – school, district, or state.

Please contact info@teachtolead.org for additional information or questions.

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Pen Pals Pilot Program

April 4, 2019

PEER 2018:  5th Grade Painting Pen Pals Pilot Program

Lynda Leonas has been a Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader since 2015, Phase 5. It was great to hear about her work at Walton School that is connecting her students with others.
5th grade students from Mrs. Breau’s class at Walton School in Auburn, Maine, began a trial practice run of the painting pen pal program on November 8 during a 30-minute art class with their art teacher, Lynda Leonas. Each student inspired personal responses and program feedback from music and art educators, teaching artists, and members of the Maine Arts Commission during the November MALI Critical Friends Day at the Viles House in Augusta. Students were thrilled with the responses they received and hope to meet their practice partners one day!
Elementary schools in Androscoggin and Cumberland Counties will participate in a larger practice run of this peer student painting exchange this coming spring. We hope to define and direct any technical adjustments necessary in creating a simple large scale painting pen pal exchange and exhibit for teachers and students within the State of Maine. Each grade 5 student will create a painting within an open choice painting studio environment. The painting will be exchanged with a student in another school district. Each participant will reflect upon key ideas and emotions expressed within the art work they receive and respond with his/her own personal interpretation to create visual conversations!
Students and teachers will expand their communities without leaving their classroom throughout the Painting Pen Pals process. Students will access and upload paintings, reflections, and literary responses in the form of poetry into a WIKI site creating an online exhibit while art and classroom teachers upload formative assessments, enrichment activities, and their own painting pen pal works! Our goal is for all peer partnerships to meet in person at a culminating exhibit of their completed works.
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MALI Teacher Leader Story: Catherine Newell

March 13, 2019

Music Educator 

This is the last of six blog posts in 2019 that include stories of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Phase 8 Teacher Leaders and Teaching Artist Leaders. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about each leader. CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 96 Teacher Leaders and 11 Teaching Artist Leaders. CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. Thank you Anthony for sharing your story!

Catherine teaching

Catherine Chesley Newell is a music educator who calls herself a “Once-And-Future Elementary Music Teacher”, because that’s what she was before she had her daughter and what she plans to do again in the future. Recently Catherine said: “Right now I have the supreme joy of teaching music with small groups of children ages 2-5 at Beansprouts Early Learning Center in Freeport. From a child development standpoint, this has been the most fascinating part of my career!”

CATHERINE’S STORY

What do you like best about being a music educator?

The magic of making a song or a rhyme or a movement artful. Children’s hands become beehives or sparks or stuck in the mud. A word becomes a laugh, a shout, or a sigh. A song becomes a declaration, an adventure, or maybe a wish. Everything is transformed by imagination into what is needed in that moment. What could be better than that?

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

A passion for learning and growth, delight in the success of others, and flexibility. Maybe not THE three keys, but they’re certainly my keys.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

If I don’t know where my students are, I can’t lift them up to where they want to go next. Assessment has an undeserved, negative reputation. It needs a rebrand! Assessment isn’t the problem; the problem is when some administrators and politicians think the data gathered should be used to punish educators.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership initiative?

There’s nothing like spending time with other passionate educators. I come away feeling energized and motivated and full of hope and inspiration. This has been one of the very best things I have been part of and I am so excited to continue our work.

What are you most proud of in your career?

All of the times I was afraid to try something new and did it anyway, or worked through a challenging experience. Especially if it was particularly scary (public speaking leaps to mind!) or the stakes were high. Those are the times I’ve grown the most as a person, musician, and educator.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

There so very many misconceptions about who is and who is not a musical person or learner. I find that reshaping perception around this is challenging work!

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

My transformation from a “band person” to a “little kids” person. I worked incredibly hard at the Kodály Music Institute to develop the skills I use today. I spent a good part of three years learning repertoire, solfege, pedagogy, and analyzing music. I studied until one or two in the morning every night of my summer sessions in Boston. It was wonderful and worthwhile and I loved it, but it was some of the hardest academic work I’ve ever done. It was, however, luck that landed me in a district that (despite having limited means) supported my summer study. Our local Maine Education Association chapter did a wonderful job negotiating a contract that prioritized professional development!

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Keep growing, keep learning, but take care of yourself, too. Say no when you need to, accept help when you can, and rejoice in your achievements harder than you dwell on your disappointments. Long-term goals are wonderful to have, but the climb is a lot easier if you celebrate along the way!

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

A good friend of mine passed away at 26 from a lifelong, chronic disease. Her greatest wish was to live long enough to get to be a music teacher. I have long thought that if I ever became fabulously wealthy, I would start a fund in her name to support music education. I think $500K would probably be a good start!

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

Taking so long to join MALI, of course!

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