Archive for the ‘Community’ Category

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HundrED Youth Ambassadors

July 3, 2019

Share with students

Are you a student reading this OR do you know students who are interested in participating in making positive change? If so, watch this video, join Jordy, and contact HundrED and apply to participate in the HundrED Youth Ambassador program.

 

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Express-a-Book

July 2, 2019

Not your traditional book club

Express-a-Book uses the Arts, to create a learner centered, collaborative environment to share ideas. Participants experience the Arts and the format highlights the accessibility and power of the creative process. When we bring people together in a collaborative and creative environment we see learners, of all ages, engage at a high level. The Express-a-Book process supports this notion.

In 2017 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Design Team members Falmouth High School music teacher Jake Sturtevant and Sweetland School founder and director Lindsay Pinchbeck and Argy Nestor who was the Director of Arts Education at the time created Express-a-Book – an innovative and creative approach to a traditional book club.

They presented the idea, after creating a protocol and experiencing it themselves, to members of MALI. Other teacher leaders stepped up, formed groups and experienced the process themselves. The results were amazing!

“It was wonderful to have the opportunity and excuse to jump in the sandbox and find ways to play with, highlight, reflect, and communicate my learning in a unique way.”

~Jake Sturtevant

HISTORY
Lindsay, Jake, and Argy planned and tried the process and presented it to the MALI participants. Lindsay wanted to read about creativity in teaching and learning so she read the article A call to action: The challenges of creative teaching and learning by R. Keith Sawyer.
Jake was curious about the power of boredom. He listened to In defense of boredom on WNYC, Radio, Manoush Zomorodi’s Podcast Note to Self, and read the book Bored and Brilliant. Argy wanted to focus on leadership so she listened to Simon Sinek’s TED Talk called How Great Leaders Inspire Action.

Once they completed their review they responded by creating artworks. Lindsay made a painting and wrote a poem, Jake created a remix mp3, and Argy made a black and white illustration. They shared and responded to each image/sounds by giving feedback and asking questions. This provided the opportunity to learn about each of their topics in a collaborative environment.

What has been learned by using Express-a-Book?

  • Share ideas and resources through an active process
  • Use the arts to make information accessible and engaging for learners
  • Learn together as a community
  • Allow for individuals who do not often engage in art making processes to experience the potential of the arts to enhance learning 
  • Offer a low cost, simple, scalable and refreshing approach to a ‘book club’ 
  • The process has practical applications for a variety of classrooms and settings. Express-a-Book can be applied across disciplines or in professional learning communities, it can take place face to face or electronically, within or across schools, districts, across a region/state/country/ or even the world.
  • Individuals must be willing to stretch and be vulnerable
  • Example of teachers teaching teachers

If you’re interested in seeing the protocol please email Argy at meartsed@gmail.com.

Express-a-Book has been used successfully at conferences and gatherings in Maine and beyond in a variety of ways. The format has been shared in workshops, videos, short articles and highlighted in Teaching Strategies That Create Assessment-Literate Learners by Jeffrey Beaudry and Anita Stewart McCafferty.

 

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Beyond the School Year

July 1, 2019

Happy July!

I hope you’ll take the time to reflect on the 2018-2019 school year and consider your successes and challenges. We know that summer is a time to relax, rejuvenate, and recharge. In order to do that it is important to look back in order to move forward. I hope you’ll ask yourself the broad questions as well as specific ones. Getting ‘down in the weeds’ about of own teaching can be very productive.

I see that Edutopia included an article that dispels the myth around students learning slipping during the summer. The original study that supported the loss of summer learning is from the 1980’s. Paul T. von Hippel, a policy professor at the University of Texas at Austin revisited the study and he learned that there are flaws in the study. He claims that the testing methods “tended to distort the test scores”. It’s an interesting follow up and I suggest that you READ the article.

Proven or not, I wonder about visual and performing arts. We’ve all heard that students lose ground in reading and math but what about their other areas of learning? What about their progress in music or visual art? When your students left on the last day of your class did you suggest that they keep drawing or playing their instrument? Did you help them devise a plan to continue ‘working at’ their art form? We all know that during summer vacation many students spend more time engaged in the arts than they have time for during the school year. Community arts programs, day and overnight camps, museum and gallery programs, activity specific programs – in many communities opportunities in the arts are plentiful. Are these ‘art experiences’ or ‘high quality arts education’? I wonder, do learners keep developing their skills, creativity and passion for the arts during the summer in great part, thanks to these programs? What do you think?

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Two Job Openings

June 29, 2019

317 Main Community Music Center, Yarmouth

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Position Summary

317 Main Community Music Center (317 Main) provides music education and enrichment activities through tuition-based programs at its studios in Yarmouth, free music education in the greater- Portland area through grant-funded partnership programs, and a variety of events, camps, and festivals throughout the year. 317 Main is looking for a music education professional to direct and lead our community partnership programs, summer camps, and other special programs including the annual HenryFest.

Position Description

The Director of Community Partnerships and Special Programs will be a key member of 317 Main’s music education administrative team and will work closely with the Director of Music Education, teaching artists, partner organizations, and the community. The specific areas of responsibility include the following:

Community Partnerships

Work with area schools, libraries, and other community service organizations to develop and implement mission-based programs that are accessible and relevant and are targeted to populations experiencing financial, geographic, and other barriers to participating in music education. These grant- and partner-funded programs are free to the students. Most students are elementary through high school age, but we also offer programming for adults and families. The key responsibilities include:

  • Work with the Director of Music Education to develop and implement program curricula that is applicable and relevant to the population(s) being served;
  • Maintain relationships with current/former partners with a focus on mission-based sustainability and compatibility;
  • Identify new community partners based on intersection of mission and opportunity;
  • Recruit/hire/train teaching artists to lead the programs;
  • Train/manage program volunteers;
  • Develop individual partner program plans that include scope, schedule, budget, and evaluation criteria;
  • Manage instrument and equipment inventory;
  • Work closely with the 317 Main Director of Music Education, Director of Development, andDirector of Marketing/Communications to support grant-writing/reporting and general communications regarding the partnership program(s);
  • Participate on the 317 Main Programming Committee; and
  • Develop annual Community Partnership Program budget and track/report on progress of the budget through the year.Summer Camps317 Main currently offers summer day-camp opportunities for children ages 6-10 (Discovery Camp) and ages 10-15 (Jam Camp). The camps are each one-week long and are designed to meet every child where they are, combining summer fun with quality music education. The Discovery Camps provide an introduction to a variety of instruments (e.g., ukulele, violin, piano, pennywhistle) and Jam Camp emphasizes ensemble play. Each session culminates in a celebratory and informal performance for family and friends. Responsibilities associated with running summer camps include:
  • Work with Director of Music Education to design annual camp structure and curricula;
  • Hire/train teaching artists and student junior counselors to teach/support camp;
  • Develop annual camp budget for approval with the Business Manager;
  • Coordinate with the Director of Marketing/Communications on the development and dissemination of marketing strategy and promotional materials; and
  • Management, oversight, and administration of all camp activities and responsibilities during each camp session.HenryFest

    Henryfest Dancing

    HenryFest is 317 Main’s annual Community Music & Dance Festival where we invite the community to come and spend the day with us at this family-friendly outdoor festival at Skyline Farm in North Yarmouth. The Festival includes a main stage for music performance, music and dance workshops designed for all ages and abilities, children’s activities, an instrument discovery tent, lawn games, local food trucks, craft beer, and homemade pie. The responsibilities for HenryFest include:

  • Developing an annual budget for HenryFest;
  • Working with the Director of Music Education to plan for and book performers for the Main Stage and workshop tents;
  • Procuring key elements of the festival infrastructure (tents, food/drink vendors, sound, etc.);
  • Recruiting/training a Volunteer Coordinator, and support the recruitment of volunteers; and
  • Management of pre-, day-of, and post-festival activities including set-up, break-down, and coordination with the owner of Skyline Farm.Qualifications
  • Bachelor’s degree in music education (preferred), music performance or comparable;
  • Administrative experience including budget development, program management, management of people, and other leadership skills;
  • Ability/desire to be part of a team in a fast-paced environment;
  • Computer skills include knowledge/experience with word processing, database, and other communication tools.The Director of Community Partnerships and Special Programs is a year-round, 32hr/week salaried position eligible for benefits. This position may be combined with an active schedule as a 317 Main Teaching Artist (compensated at 317 Main Teaching Artist rates)To Apply

    Please email your current resume with a cover letter to apply@317main.org. It will be helpful if your cover letter indicates how your professional interests and qualifications are a good match with the position and the 317 Main Community Music Center’s mission to encourage creative expression, personal growth, and community connection through music. To apply by mail, please send to: 317 Main Community Music Center, 317 Main Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096.

LITTLE ROOTS PROGRAM COORDINATOR Early Childhood Music Education / Part-time 

Position Summary

317 Main’s Little Roots program is an important part of the 317 Main curriculum and continuum. We are looking for an experienced and energetic early childhood education professional to coordinate the continued growth and development of 317 Main’s Little Roots program.

317 Main’s Little Roots Program Coordinator will work closely with the Director of Music Education, Little Roots teaching artists, administrative staff, and the 317 Main community to facilitate the Little Roots early childhood (ages 0-6) music education programs and services at 317 Main.

317 Main’s Little Roots curriculum combines music-making with movement, encouraging young children to feel the music in their bodies as they learn fundamental creative skills. Little Roots programs are distinctive, relevant, and consistent with 317’s friendly, fun, and accessible mission-based priorities. This welcoming approach is combined with a curricular foundation that, in a group setting, teaches children (and family members) to: sing comfortably; experience rhythm physically; and develop a dynamic and emotional relationship with the communicative power of music.

Current Little Roots offerings include Little Roots Family (all ages with caregivers), Little Roots Drum & Strum (djembe & ukulele, 3-5 yr olds), Little Roots Ukulele, Little Roots Fiddle, and Little Roots Piano classes (5 & 6 yr olds). Classes are currently offered Monday-Friday with plans to expand into Saturday and possibly into communities beyond our home base in Yarmouth.

Position Description

The Little Roots Program Coordinator has two primary functional responsibilities. The first functional responsibility is to work with the Director of Music Education to deliver a curriculum that is relevant, compelling, and consistent with the 317 Main approach to music education which:

• combines fun with quality music education
• attracts and retains families with children ages birth to 6 years old
• connects to the established program continuum beyond age 6
• has systems in place which measure the quality, consistency, and value of all of the programs and services offered and allows for continuous improvement.

The other primary area of responsibility will be to work with the Director of Music Education to:

  • mentor, coordinate training, and evaluate Little Roots teaching artists/programs
  • coordinate annual program plan for Little Roots
  • work with the Director of Marketing and Communications to develop a marketing & communications plan for the Little Roots program
  • communicate with parents and teaching artists about Little Roots program offerings
  • maintain an active schedule as a Little Roots teaching artist (compensated separately at 317 Main Teaching Artist rates)
  • plan and implement special programs and events designed to promote the Little Roots brand to the greater community
  • develop and maintain an annual budget for equipment, supplies, meetings, and training sessions, and work with the Business/Finance Director to make necessary purchases
  • be the ambassador of the Little Roots music to the communityQualifications
  • Must have passion, dedication, and experience in the field of early childhood music education
  • Must be personally engaging, friendly and want to work in a fast-paced community-oriented environment
  • Must have experience and be comfortable working with children, parents, teaching artists, and administrative staff
  • Must possess strong administrative skills and have experience developing and overseeing the implementation of program plans
  • Must be able to work as a team player in support of an organizational mission
  • Must possess good verbal and written communication skills
  • Instrumental and vocal skills are strongly preferredRequirements• Degree in Early Childhood preferred, K-5 or comparable experience considered • At least 3 years of teaching experience in an early childhood education setting • Certification/experience in Kodály, Orff, and/or First Steps in Music a plus

    The Little Roots Program Coordinator is a part-time, year-round, 16hr/week program administration position. It is designed to be combined with an active schedule as a Little Roots Teaching Artist (compensated at 317 Main Little Roots Teaching Artist rates).

    To Apply

    Please email your current resume with a cover letter to apply@317main.org. It will be helpful if your cover letter indicates how your professional interests and qualifications are a good match with the position and the 317 Main Community Music Center’s mission to: encourage creative expression, personal growth, and community connection through music. To apply by mail, please send to: 317 Main Community Music Center, 317 Main Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096.

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Creating Live Paintings

June 26, 2019

Buffalo, NY

A friend sent me a photo of an event that they were visiting in Buffalo, NY called Arts Alive. It is held at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, a museum which is a major showpiece for modern and contemporary art.

St. Mary’s High School’s re-creation of James Ensor’s The Intrigue, 1911 (Collection Minneapolis Institute of Art). Photograph by Tom Loonan.

For 23 years the gallery has hosted the annual Arts Alive event where participants create living representations of famous works of art for cash prizes. Anyone can and does participate including students, community groups, organizations, families, and individuals. Participants build their stunning replicas—often called tableaux—using people, props, and their creativity.

More than $1,000 in cash prizes is given to winning tableaux. Celebrity judges will select the Best Tableau from the Albright-Knox’s Collection or AK Public Art, Best Craftsmanship, and Most Creative Entry. The awards are presented in each category (Grades K–8, Grades 9–12, and Adult/Family Group). There is also a People’s Choice Award. And, of course, music, art activities, and more is celebrated as part of this special community event.

View a short YouTube video from the 20th year of the Arts Alive event.

 

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Hike Through History

June 25, 2019

South Berwick

In May I was invited to the Hamilton House and Vaughn Woods in South Berwick for the 25th anniversary of Hike Through History. It’s an annual teaching and learning opportunity in RSU #35 that continues to be a success due to the commitment of many educators and volunteers. It is usually held in town so it was a treat to have it in such a beautiful woodsy setting.

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leaders and Music Educators Kate Smith and Kris Bisson collaborated in teaching traditional dances and music. First they taught the 8th grade students from Marshwood Middle School several dance steps and they turned around and taught the elementary students. In addition, they also taught a few modern dances. Melanie Crowe, Marshwood Middle School art teacher and MALI Teacher Leader worked with students teaching them techniques and they turned around and taught elementary students. Printmaking, weaving, painting on stone and poetry. I was so impressed with the level of engagement of the 500 students who visited and provided the instruction. And, the hundreds of volunteers and parents. It was simply wonderful – a real community collaboration.

All of the photos in the blog post were taken at the two stations where Kris, Kate and Melanie were.

The information below was provided by Julia Einstein, Education Program Coordinator for Historic New England, who plays an integral part in the success of the Hike Through History.

For this year’s Hike, it was all about character studies—and for the grade eight students to look at each person, or family, as a character you can “inhabit” after you have researched the parts of their life. As a result, the student is able to enjoy this way of learning as he/she  steps into the history of the people and of this place that was once the center of the town of South Berwick. This location at Hamilton House (built in 1785) and Vaughn Woods tells the story of the native people, first settlers, the start of America, and how we changed from an agricultural to an industrial nation. Inventiveness and inventions through these times, from a shipbuilding, navigation on water, and early photography.

It was a pleasure for me to be able to write the content for the student’s work in the classroom, as well as to mentor two grade eight classes for this special, new Hike. I, along with a committee of content writers, each put together our topic to include main Ideas, characters to include, vocabulary, possible Activities, and sources for additional Research.

Here’s a brief overview of what I put together:

Hamilton House Walk Through

Topic:  Hamilton House’s long, long, life — three families over 236 years! — and the different ways they lived.

Main Ideas: Did you ever “read” a house? If we learn to “read” the details left behind, a house can tell stories of the people who lived there long ago!  The Hamilton House contains lots of history, as there were three owners, over different centuries.

Possible Activities: A student tour of the first floor of the Hamilton House–a guided walk into 1785 and walk out in 1898 in which the 8th grade students give the elementary visitors the prompts to observe, notice details, and ask questions. Also, create activities or experiences to share the lives of the three different families who lived there.  Why were they there?  What did they value about the house and land?

Inspired by History: Elise Tyson & Sarah Orne Jewett

Topic: Historical preservation, Literary and Visual Arts in the 19th century

Main Ideas: What is “inspiration”? A beautiful, historical place like the Hamilton House can give us inspiration! Elise Tyson would have taken advantage of the recent invention of a (more) portable box camera to move around and photograph outside and inside the Hamilton House. One is able to look into her photographs to study the early days of film photography. It was very rare for women to be photographers during this era! Sarah Orne Jewett would have used her portable wicker writing box to write on site. One is able to read her fiction (The Tory Lover) and non-fiction (River Driftwood) based upon the landscape and characters of the Hamilton House, as seen in these excerpts:
River Driftwood She described Hamilton House in 1881 as being “like a glimpse of sunshiny, idle Italy: the sparkling river and the blue sky, the wide green shores and the great gray house, with its two hall doors standing wide open, the lilacs in bloom and no noise or hurry, – a quiet place, that the destroying left hand of progress had failed to touch.”
The Tory Lover “As for Colonel Hamilton, the host,” she wrote, “a strong-looking, bright-colored man in the middle thirties, the softness of a suit of brown, and his own hair well dressed and powdered, did not lessen a certain hardness in his face, a grave determination, and maturity of appearance far beyond the due of his years. Hamilton had easily enough won the place of chief shipping merchant and prince of money-makers in that respectable group, and until these dark days of war almost every venture by land or sea had added to his fortunes. The noble house that he had built was still new enough to be the chief show and glory of a rich provincial neighborhood.” Due to these two friends’ inspiration and love of history, we are now lucky enough to be able to learn about and experience this beautiful house and grounds.

It was also an wonderful opportunity for me to expand upon a school program that is already in place for grade three students of Central School, “Amoungst Friends, Sarah Orne Jewett and her Circle.”  This circle expanded to her friends Emily and Elise Tyson (later Elise Tyson Vaughn and her husband Henry Vaughn), who she convinced to purchase and restore the house to it’s Hamilton era glory–and in the process to preserve history.  In a visit to all third grade classrooms, I introduced the students to the Hamilton House and guided the students to make a Captain’s Log. When the students visited the house, they were guided to make an observation, both inside and outside in the garden, and record in his/her log, by writing & through sketching. We also played a Maritime Trade Game–with a partner, the students used a World  Map to find the source, the countries from which  “raw” materials brought back to South Berwick by Jonathan Hamilton’s ships. It was a ton of fun–a great way to prepare for the special upcoming Hike.

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Bowdoin College

June 24, 2019

The Arts are happening

Bowdoin College has a plethora of opportunities during July to engage in the arts. Some of the offerings are listed below.

Audubon ‘Birds of America’ Page-Turning Summer Social.        July 12, 2019
Time:10:00 AM — 1:00 PM
Location:Hawthorne Longfellow Library, Special Collections

Join Special Collections & Archives staff for an extended summer page-turning event of John James Audubon’s double-elephant folio edition of Birds of America. Beginning at 10:00 a.m., the festivities start with a page-turning and guest speaker, followed by the opportunity to make your own bird-of-the-month keepsake pin. Join us in the Library’s Media Commons at 11:00 a.m. for a screening of the 56 minute PBS documentary Audubon (2017) with refreshments. At 12:30, return to the Special Collections & Archives reading room for another page-turning of Birds of America. Free and open to the public; drop by for any or all parts of the event.

Family Art Night at the Museum of Art
July 12, 2019
Time:4:00 PM — 7:00 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Vodoin students offer a veriety of activities for families, based on the exhibitions on view.  Presented as part of Second Friday Brunswick, as an inclusive series of events intended to provide an opportunity to engage with the arts all within walking distance of Maine Street.
Free and open to the public.

Art and Music: a Family Program with the Bowdoin International Music Festival
July 13, 2019
Time:10:00 AM — 11:00 AM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Faculty and students from the Bowdoin International Music Festival lead a family program about music and the fine arts within the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
Free and open to the public.

Gallery Conversation: “When What is Old is New Again”
July 16, 2019
Time:12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Anne Collins Goodyear, co-director, leads a discussion of the exhibition Emerging Modernisms, American and European Art, 1900–1950, exploring the enduring relevance of modernist provocations and innovations for artists and audiences today.

Music at the Museum
July 18, 2019
Time:11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Faculty from the Bowdoin International Music Festival perform in conjunction with the summer exhibitions at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Limited seating. Free tickets required.

Children’s Hour at the Museum of Art
July 25, 2019
Time:5:00 PM — 6:00 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Bowdoin College students lead creative activities relating to the exhibitions on view for children and families.
Free and open to the public.

Student Composer Concert
July 27, 2019
Time:2:00 PM — 3:15 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Students from the Bowdoin International Music Festival perform original pieces inspired by works on view.
Free and open to the public.

Gallery Conversation: “How to Master a Contemporary Art Obstacle Course”
July 30, 2019
Time:12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Location:Museum of Art, Pavilion
Contemporary art tests viewers’ abilities to look intently, think boldly, and express themselves creatively. Discussing selected works on view in Art Purposes, curator Joachim Homann dares participants to take up the challenge and invites them to share questions and observations.
Free and open to the public.

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