Archive for the ‘Community’ Category

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Pecha Kucha Waterville

December 12, 2019

What’s your story?

PechaKucha Night Waterville is a creative networking event centered on storytelling in 20×20. Every event is well attended and provides its own distinctive journey.

PK WTVL Volume 34 will take place on Thursday, February 7, 2020 (snow date: February 8, 2020) during Maine Craft Weekend. The deadline to apply for the February 7th event is Tuesday, January 7, 2020. in collaboration with the Colby College Center for the Arts + Humanities, proposals related to the 2019/2020 Colby College Center for the Arts + Humanities theme, Energy + Exhaustion are encouraged.

Selected presenters will be notified via email.

CLICK HER TO APPLY

GUIDELINES

PAST PK PRESENTATIONS 

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Transforming a School Through Arts Integration

December 11, 2019

Edutopia

“The arts provide an access point for everyone,” Caitlin Gordon, a Maya Lin third grade teacher, told Schwartz. “I think it allows children to learn about how the process of something is just as important, if not more important, than the product. I think it just really helps create more of that well-balanced, critical-thinking person that we want for our future.”

Educators and parents alike at the Maya Lin Elementary in Alameda, California believe wholeheartedly in their approach to education with arts integration. They were at risk of closing not long ago and it was the transformation of the school with arts integration that has made all the difference.

You can READ THE ARTICLE written by Laura Lee and published by Edutopia on November 8, 2019.

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The Art of Education

December 9, 2019

Photo booth in the classroom

Informative blog post put out by The Art of Education. Seven Reasons You Need a Photo Booth in the Art Room. A Lightbox is one and a studio photo setup is another. The ARTICLE expands on these two topics providing you with useful information.

The Art of Ed University provides resources in a variety of ways. Check out the WEBSITE to learn more.

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Soldier’s Sketchbooks

December 7, 2019

Documenting History

At age 21-year Victor Lundy dropped out of architecture school and became an infantry soldier in World War II.  He didn’t give up on his creative side and actually made documentary sketches using pencil of where he was and what he saw. He struggled to listen to lectures and was busy instead of sketching in 8 pocket-sized notebooks. His collection was donated by Lundy, at the age of 92 to the Library of Congress. They’ve all been scanned and are available online at THIS LINK.

This taken from the article: “The vivid images show everything from air raids to craps games for cigarettes. A sense of longing for home is a recurring theme in his sketches, which include detailed drawings of his bunk as well as particularly dream-like drawing, titled Home Sweet Home, that shows a soldier lounging on a hammock.In we have a breathtaking visual record of World War II, in the form of documentary sketches. For Lundy, “drawing is sort of synonymous with thinking,” which means we are left with an intimate archive of sketches that unfold one soldier’s experience fighting on the front lines.”

Learn more in THIS ARTICLE written by Jessica Stewart on November 14, 2016.

Lundy went on and became a very successful architect. Read about his career on WikipediaAs far as I can tell he is still alive.

 

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Light Up the World

December 3, 2019

Local workshops

On Saturday morning I arrived at the library in my town with a car full of materials to make lanterns. Basket reeds, telephone wire, tiny LED lights, industrial size coffee filters, white glue, blow dryers, brushes and containers to hold the water downed glue. I learned how to make lanterns from artist Gowri Savoor while attending the 2017 New Hampshire state arts education conference. I am forever grateful to Julianne Gadoury, New Hampshire State Council on the Arts Education Program Director invited Catherine Ring and myself to attend.

Since that conference Lindsay Pinchbeck, founder and director of Sweet Tree Arts Center in Hope, and I have offered the lantern making workshop several times at the local and state level to all ages and backgrounds of people. This is the type of art making that is inviting to all.

When we’ve provided the workshop it exemplifies the essence of small communities in Maine. Whether it’s at the library, community center, a community event, or an arts focused facility people find joy and success making lanterns.

Kate Smith is involved in the South Berwick Lanternfest that takes place each August. This past summer she helped lead music making with a drum circle and at the end they release the lanterns down the river to honor those who have gone before.  All ages come together for an amazing day. Whether it is small or large communities art making has the power to bring communities together.

The two hour lantern making workshop is enough time to make at least one lantern (two people made 3 in the time allotted) and dry it enough to carry home. The next day the tree lighting on the town common was a chance to lead the processional with Santa following in a town fire truck. Two people returned with their lanterns decorated. I wondered if everyone would return and sure enough my heart was warmed seeing everyone with their lanterns lit waiting at the designated spot.

My takeaways:

  • The arts bring people together in a non-judgmental way and everyone feels good.
  • All ages need and want community based chances to come together.
  • People naturally work across generations to help each other.
  • Many adults don’t make art everyday but jump at the chance to do so and love it.
  • Adults are looking for opportunities to do something engaging side-by-side with children.
  • Having a follow-up chance to use the lanterns collectively is like the glue that is needed in communities.

What I’m curious about is this – what have you noticed or been involved with that includes the arts to bring people together beyond the school – in the community? Please feel free to share in the comment section below. Thanks!

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Support for the Arts

November 26, 2019

Bumper sticker of the season

A few days ago I pulled into the parking lot of Hannafords in Topsham. I happened to park next to a car with the bumper sticker you see in the photo below. I’ve seen the car before and wondered who it belonged to. I was in luck, when I came out of the store there was the owner of the car putting her groceries into the back. Turns out it was Amy Crosby who is an art teacher in Brunswick at the elementary level. Thanks Amy for promoting the arts!

This seems like a good opportunity with Thanksgiving a day away to say THANK YOU to visual and performing arts teachers and let you know how grateful I am for the work you do impacting young people in eduction and beyond!

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Do You Think Kids Are Stupid?

November 25, 2019

Abhijit Sinha

Founder and CEO of Project DEFY, Abhijit Sinha, has created the Nook Self-Learning model in a small village near Bangalore and leads Project DEFY.  He and a team have enabled many communities to develop and run their own Nooks. Abhijit believes that high-quality​ education should be accessible in every ‘Nook’ & corner of the country. He is a proponent of the Makerspace concept where each individual is responsible for his or her own education. In this TED talk, Abhijit focuses on how Project Defy which came into existence and has been successfully running without school teachers albeit with internet connection & local volunteers.

What started as an experiment at the age of 22, has now become a functional format of scalable self-learning that is taking shape in the grassroots of the world. He is attempting to de-colonize mindsets by deconstructing education and bringing the control of learning and life back into the hands of the people. He is a habitual optimist and a forever-learner, who has a lot to say, but usually prefers keeping his head down and working. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

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