Archive for the ‘Creativity’ Category

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Teaching Artist Opportunity

July 1, 2015

Novice and Experienced Teaching Artists invited

Monday, August 3, Wishcamper Center, USM, Portland, 8:30 – 4:00

The Maine Arts Commission invites you to a day of networking and professional development with PK-12 Visual and Performing Arts teachers.

MAAI Logo_Color_TxtCtrThe day includes workshops designed specifically for Teaching Artists plus opportunities to engage with more than 50 teachers from Maine and NH about arts education; teaching, learning, standards, assessment, advocacy, and other pertinent topics.

You may choose to participate with the teachers as they continue their professional development work on Tuesday and Wednesday, August 4 and 5. However, Monday is designed especially for YOU, the Teaching Artist.

The day includes lunch and is FREE but you MUST APPLY by July 15. The application is located at THIS LINK.

Participants will:

  • Network with PK-12 Arts Educators and other Teaching Artists
  • Exhibit your Teaching Artist materials and skills
  • Participate in workshops designed specifically to help you succeed as a Teaching Artist
  • Gain insights and new knowledge about working in public schools
  • Identify as part of a professional Teaching Artist field
  • Learn more about the Maine Arts Commission’s Teaching Artist roster

Presented by Maine Arts Assessment Institute (MAAI) of the Maine Arts Commission. To learn more about the MAAI please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI#.

If you have any questions please contact Argy Nestor, Director of Arts Education, Maine Arts Commission, argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Teacher Leader Quotes

June 28, 2015

Great opportunities

100_3195We often hear what participants have to say about the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) but we don’t share those comments quite enough. Below are some that really speak to me and hopefully they will you, as well!

You will have the opportunity to attend the Statewide Biennial Arts Education Conference: The Measure of Success, Friday, October 9, Point Lookout. The Maine Arts Assessment Initiative is proud to continually offer high quality professional development opportunities and The Measure of Success proves to continue this tradition. For more information and to register (during the early bird registration) please click here.

  • “(The Institute) affirmed what I already do and encouraged me to look for more ways to improve my practice”
  • “(I’m interested in) how to implement standards-based assessment in a school system that still uses a traditional grading system”
  • “I’ve changed my rubrics to better reflect what I’ve learned from the workshop and also to reflect what I’m learning about proficiency-based education”
  • “I’m using student input more now to create rubrics and (exemplars) as a basis for creating criteria for student work”
  • “I’m more aware of work other teachers are doing in this area”
  • “It totally changed my assessment practices”
  • “I’m learning with a renewed sense of purpose and a feeling that we WILL make a difference in re-inventing education.”
  • “I have shown video clips to students, I have started my own blog and become a lover of Twitter.  I have learned more about technology and the arts this year than I ever have in my life.”
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Standardized Tests

June 19, 2015

How some students feel about standardized tests

Ms. Chang is an art teacher at Burlington High School in Massachusetts. She recently asked her students to create art answering the question “How Do You Feel About Standardized Tests?” You can view the answers to the question on her blog called Ms. Chang’s Art Classes located at http://mschangart.weebly.com/home/students-create-art-answering-the-question-how-do-you-feel-about-standardized-tests.

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Who Are They?: Schoodic Arts for All, Part 6

June 17, 2015

Intern program

This blog post is part of a series called Who Are They? where information is provided for the Maine Arts Ed blog readers to learn about community organizations and institutions that provide educational opportunities in the arts. You will learn that they are partnering with other organizations and schools to extend learning opportunities, not supplant. Please consider ways in which you can collaborate to provide excellent arts education for all learners.

safa_logo_blue_greenThis is the sixth and last blog post of the series highlighting the work of Schoodic Arts for All located in Hammond Hall, 427 Main Street in Winter Harbor. This area is called Downeast Maine and Schoodic Arts for All is at the intersection of Hancock and Washington Counties. Schoodic Arts for All is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering interest and involvement in the arts for all who wish to participate.

A special THANK YOU to Mary Laury and Anna Woolf for providing the content for the six blog posts on Schoodic Arts for All. These posts have provided a clear picture of the depth and breath of the programming that is offered. This post is especially fascinating and I am sure you will agree once you read it that, the future is in good hands knowing the opportunities and experiences that Schoodic Arts for All provides to young people as interns.

Junior Interns

“Interning at Schoodic Arts For All has been an incredible opportunity. During my internship (along with technical skills such as working the lights and the sound board for performances) I learned how to work collaboratively with my coworkers, how to set goals and eventually reach them, and how to positively approach problems with innovative and creative solutions. Besides looking incredible on a resumé, interning and working at Schoodic Arts has given me the experience and skills necessary to survive in any work environment because of the broad amounts of tasks I was expected to complete. Working effectively in an office environment, getting out in the community through events and programs, and working with artists from around the state have made me incredibly confident and prepared for any and all directions I might go in the future.” 

Hannah Gignoux

Schoodic Arts for engages youth in leadership roles as Junior Interns (ages 12–15) and then as (paid) Summer Interns (ages 16 – 21). Many of these interns have moved on to become very successful, including 3 who have gone on to become executive directors before reaching the age of 25.

2001-RIVERA SUN COOK, Executive Director Rising Sun Dance Theatre

RiveraRivera Sun Cook was the very first Schoodic Arts intern. Her job description as the very first intern consisted of “moving chairs, doing everything and anything, and having fun!” She is now a successful Executive Director of her company, Rising Sun Dance Theatre, and has written two novels, “Steam Drills, Treadmills, and Shooting Stars” and “The Dandelion Insurrection.”

 

 

 

 

2003-SHELBY HOWE GREENE, Executive Director Eastport Arts Center

ShelbyShelby Howe Greene became an intern with Schoodic Arts for All, shortly after graduating from high school in 2003. After interning, she continued to return during the summers for summer programming.

After graduating from college, she began working at the Eastport Arts Center in Eastport, Maine for 3 years. She wrote grants and worked with volunteers and the community. She left the Eastport Arts Center in 2011, and eventually became an Americorps member with the Washington County Food and Fuel Alliance in 2012, and Maine Sea Coast Mission EdGE after school program in 2013. She currently operates her own cloth diapering business, The Meanie Greene on Etsy.

 

 

2004-JEFFE GREENE, Engineer

Jeffe Greene was an intern at Schoodic Arts for All in 2004 after finishing high school. He attended Maine Maritime Academy and received a degree in Engineering with a BA in Science and Technology.

2006-CHARLOTTE GUERTLER, Yale

CharlotteCharlotte attended many Schoodic Arts for All festivals, and took lots of workshops before becoming an intern. Schoodic Arts for All classes have helped her become a better artist and observer, and being an intern has helped her improve her job skills. One of the most important things she learned from her internship was how to overcome her shyness.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2007- BREANNA PINKHAM, Executive Director of Our Town Belfast

BreannaBreanna Pinkham was involved with Schoodic Arts for All from a very young age in workshops and performances. She joined Schoodic Steel and, shortly after, the Meetinghouse Theatre Lab. She began working as assistant and year-round helper at Schoodic Arts for All on her 21st birthday. She began by using adobe design programs, and slowly took over graphic design and website duties as well as managing the office. She worked at Schoodic Arts for All while going to school for an undergraduate degree in Interdisciplinary Fine Arts. She became Executive Director of the Main Street program, Our Town Belfast in Belfast, Maine.

 

 

2010-LEILA SAAD, Director and Publisher, Maude Magazine

Leila Leila when she was littleLeila has been involved with Schoodic Arts for All from a very young age. Raised in the festival, she was always involved in workshops, which eased her into becoming a staff member.

 

2011-2013-NICK RUCKER, Tech specialist

NickAble to sculpt and define his job, Nick Rucker was mainly involved with web design, lights and sound. He loved the freedom and macromanaged environment in the Schoodic Arts for All office. Trust was a big part of his job, being handed a task, and having the freedom to accomplish the task in his own way.

 

 

 

 

2011-OREN DARLING, Designer

OrenOren Darling is a Web and Graphic Design Associate for the Purdue Research Foundation, which works to improve Purdue as a world-class university by aiding in scientific investigation, research and educational studies, maintaining facilities, grounds, and equipment, and managing intellectual property. His work at Schoodic Arts for All helped him become familiar with promoting and organizing events.

 

 

2012-ELIZA HUBER-WEISS, student

Eliza's t-shirt designEliza Huber-Weiss, a talented cellist, was a summer intern for Schoodic Arts for All in 2012. She was often in charge of organizing events and publicity. Eliza is a very artistic young lady, and even designed the 2012 and 2013 Schoodic Arts for All festival t-shirts. She now attends Bowdoin college and studies Liberal Arts.

 

 

2012-ALEXANDRA BROWN, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Alex'x book coverWhen Alexandra joined Schoodic Arts for All she was very interested in history. She decided to create a special summer project in her time as an intern, which was to curate a show of historic photos of Winter Harbor. The exhibit was displayed where people could go and write down any memories they had of these historic buildings. With these comments, she compiled a book called “Historic Photographs of Winter Harbor” which was registered with the Library of Congress. Her internship and printed book helped her resume grow, and as a result she moved on to get a job in the museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

 

2012-2014-BELLA DESISTO, Student

BellaBella DeSisto became involved with Schoodic Arts for All from a young age, starting as a volunteer and working her way up to become a staff member. She was mostly involved with the junior interns in Prospect Harbor and as the logistics person on staff.

 

 

 

 

 

2013-2014-HANNAH GIGNOUX, Student

HannahHannah Gignoux has been involved with Schoodic Arts for All from a very young age, taking a wide variety of workshops, performing at Brown Bag Lunches, opening for Last Friday Coffee Houses, and as a member of the Pandemonium steel band.

She worked at Schoodic Arts for All for two years as a summer intern, then as a staff member. Her main projects during her time here mostly involved organizing the annual Silent Auction and Final Showcase, and managing lighting for performances.

The arts are a big part of her life, and she plans to remain involved with the arts all the way through her college career.

 

 

2013-2014-PEPIN MITTELHAUSER, Musician and performer

Pepin's Baby picture Pepin
Pepin became involved with Schoodic Arts for All through several performance groups, including the Schoodic Summer Chorus, Steel Pan groups, and eventually his own performing group. He is now a program assistant for Schoodic Arts for All, and is also in charge of Pecha Kucha presentations, and performance managing such as running lights and sound.

 

2014-HANNAH WOODWARD, Student

Hannah WoodwardHannah Woodward has been involved with Schoodic Arts since 2001. She began her relationship with Schoodic Arts by taking workshops and attending performances. She was a member of the original Pandemonium Steel Band. She became a junior intern in 7th grade, and became a part time summer intern as a Summer Program Assistant. She has always had a steady relationship with Schoodic Arts for All and the festival.

 

 

 

2014, ELLEN JOHNSON, student

Ellen baby picture EllenEllen Johnson has been a junior intern since the age of 12. She is a member of the original Pandemonium steel band, and has been with Schoodic Arts for All from a very young age. She became a summer intern, in charge of press releases and organizing junior interns and Brown Bag Lunch, and is now summer staff.

2014-SINAI HERRERA, student

SinaiSinai Herrera began her relationship with Schoodic Arts for All when she joined the Pandemonium Steel drum band in 7th grade. She became a summer intern in 2014 and is now summer staff. She is mostly in charge of publicity but also compiled this biography of interns.

 

 

Intern positions give young community members an opportunity to have a fun, rewarding job involving the arts.

If you have questions about the Schoodic Arts for All Intern program or any of their other programs please contact the Executive Director, Mary Laury, at marylaury@schoodicartsforall.org.

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Who Are They?: Schoodic Arts for All, Part 5

June 10, 2015

Ongoing programs

This blog post is part of a series called Who Are They? where information is provided for the Maine Arts Ed blog readers to learn about community organizations and institutions that provide educational opportunities in the arts. You will learn that they are partnering with other organizations and schools to extend learning opportunities, not supplant. Please consider ways in which you can collaborate to provide excellent arts education for all learners.

safa_logo_blue_greenThis is the fifth blog post of the series highlighting the work of Schoodic Arts for All located in Hammond Hall, 427 Main Street in Winter Harbor. This area is called Downeast Maine and Schoodic Arts for All is at the intersection of Hancock and Washington Counties. Schoodic Arts for All is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering interest and involvement in the arts for all who wish to participate.

A ways Downeast there sits a peninsula filled with nature and the arts and hard working people. Schoodic Arts for All seeks to foster and to coalesce various artists and community members to develop an arts center providing year round cultural events and activities that hold value for residents of our community and to encourage participants of all ages to express themselves creatively and gain a lifelong appreciation for the arts and creative spirit. Increasingly, society is recognizing that cultural opportunities are essential to the life of the community. People need assistance to promote and organize opportunities for creative self-expression, and the community realizes the importance of recognizing the talents of their residents. There is considerable evidence that increased leisure is prompting people to look to the cultural arts for skill development, personal satisfaction, recognition, potential income and as a means for lessening stress. The arts offer a way for people to express themselves, communicate with others and develop life skills.

In addition to regularly scheduled events and workshops, there has been within the past few years a number of user generated and directed creative groups formed which have been fully supported by Schoodic Arts for All.

The information in this post provides a picture of the diverse and rich offerings that Schoodic Arts for All provides the community members.

Artists to Entrepreneurs  

Contrary to the stereotype of “starving artists” who’ve given up hope of life’s comforts, a burgeoning category of creative entrepreneurs are building wealth, creating jobs and becoming a major force in the local economy.

Artists to Entrepreneurs

The Union of Maine Visual Artists (UMVA)

This group represents visual artists statewide in all fields of endeavor and welcomes those who support contemporary artists in Maine. The UMVA is dedicated to upholding the dignity of artists, while creating positive social change through the arts. By collaborating with other cultural and political organizations, we raise awareness for significant issues while promoting an inclusive arts community in Maine. We are grassroots and we are active. We fear no art.

UMVA atlantic art glass

Variable Winds Recorder Group

This group promotes the study, practice and appreciation of the recorder. It is for everyone interested in playing, studying or listening to recorder music.

variable winds recorder group

Singing Circle

This circle is a singing community with attitude. We’re a “vocal jam-fest with heart,” a community gathering of folks who form an improvised chorus.

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Ukulele Club

The ukulele club is a group of friendly ukulele players who like to socialize, jam, trade music, learn from each other, eat, laugh, sing and play!

Ukulele

Painting Group

The painting group meets weekly with a flurry of painting styles, companionship and learning.

deb with paintings

If you have questions about Schoodic Arts for All please contact the Executive Director, Mary Laury at marylaury@schoodicartsforall.org.

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GT Art Seminar

June 4, 2015

District-wide in RSU#38

On May 15th a district wide Art Seminar was held for Gifted and Talented Art students in grades 3-12. A total of 22 GT Art students participated in the three art sessions presented by local artists at their studios. Christine Higgins and Thomas Higgins share a studio in Readfield. Christine creates sculptural forms and pulp paintings from her handmade paper. Thomas is a plein air oil landscape painter. Their website is http://christinejhigginsfineart.com. Melissa Fredsall is a glass artist and she teaches a variety of glass arts at the Stained Glass Express studio in Manchester. Their website is www.stainedglassexpress.com.

The students were divided into two groups: elementary students and middle school/high school students. Ms. Lord, the middle school art teacher, accompanied the MS/HS students as they started their day at the Dragonfly studio in Readfield. Students listened to a short presentation by Christine and Thomas about their art and how they communicate a message with their artwork and then they got right to work creating art. While high school students sat on the edge of the woods with Thomas and learned techniques to sketch a graphite landscape, Christine taught the middle school students how to screen and press pulp fibers into paper and dye the fibers to create a design. After an hour the two groups switched places, so that each group were able to work along side both artists.

Meanwhile at the Stain Glass Express studio, Ms. McPhedran, a district elementary art teacher, and the elementary students were working with Melissa Fredsall to create glass mosaic tiles. Each student selected colored glass pieces to form a design, which they glued to the tile and then grouted the glass pieces. Each student was able to finish their tile and bring it home the same day.

After students ate their lunches, they boarded the bus and MS/HS students traveled to the Stained Glass studio and Elementary students traveled to the Dragonfly studio. The elementary students received the same two presentations by Christine and Thomas and created their own paper and sketched landscapes with graphite and colored pencils. The MS/HS students spent the afternoon cutting glass and creating several glass design pieces, that were later fired in the glass kiln and made into beautiful magnets.

It was a wonderful day spent with great weather, talented artists, and creative students. On the bus ride back to school the students exclaimed what a great time they all had and were greatly inspired to use their new art skills.

Photos of the day can be viewed at: https://drive.google.com/file/d/ 0BxHQTmvxop2OTHR4RWwycEFTcEk/view?usp=sharing

Thank you to Hope Lord, Maranacook Middle School ART teacher for providing this great blog post.

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Who Are They?: Schoodic Arts for All, Part 4

June 3, 2015

Schoodic festival

This blog post is part of a series called Who Are They? where information is provided for the Maine Arts Ed blog readers to learn about community organizations and institutions that provide educational opportunities in the arts. You will learn that they are partnering with other organizations and schools to extend learning opportunities, not supplant. Please consider ways in which you can collaborate to provide excellent arts education for all learners.

safa_logo_blue_greenThis is the fourth blog post of the series highlighting the work of Schoodic Arts for All located in Hammond Hall, 427 Main Street in Winter Harbor. This area is called Downeast Maine and Schoodic Arts for All is at the intersection of Hancock and Washington Counties. Schoodic Arts for All is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering interest and involvement in the arts for all who wish to participate.

Schoodic Arts for All evolved out of an organization called Maine Futures, in 1998. The first year ofDSC_0023 the festival was 1999 when we had around 65 workshops and seven or eight performances. That year we had no office, a small grant from the Maine Community Foundation, a few volunteers, and a part time director. Most of the work was done at Darthia Farm, even to using the farm’s credit card machine to sign up students.

It has grown over the years but we try to maintain the “grassroots” feeling of workshops and performances and to keep the tuition and admission charges low through donations and grants.

We are presenting many workshops in a number of categories. We have craft, visual art, cooking, DSC_0126writing, fiber, clay, dance, jewelry, music, and several free classes. The workshops are held throughout the entire Schoodic Peninsula in various venues in the many villages.

We also present 14 evening performances at Hammond Hall in Winter Harbor including music, theater, dance, film, and puppetry.

In Prospect Harbor, every day at noon, we have a free “brown bag” performance ranging from guitarists, reptiles, kids playing music, lectures.

During the two weeks of the Schoodic Arts Festival, the Schoodic Peninsula is transformed into a hub-bub of children and adults making and doing and observing art in all genres.

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If you have questions about the Schoodic Arts for All Festival or any of their other programs please contact the Executive Director, Mary Laury, at marylaury@schoodicartsforall.org.

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