Archive for the ‘Curriculum and Instruction’ Category

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Edutopia

November 14, 2018

Maine art educator

Carol Shutt retired in June after 27 wonderful years as the K-8 art teacher at Mount Desert Elementary School in Northeast Harbor. Congratulations to Carol for her article that was recently published in Edutopia called Making an Event out of ArtThe piece is about the annual Arts Week (20 years) and suggestions on how to plan for one.

You can read an interview with Carol posted last February on this blog.

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A Bit of Helsinki

November 13, 2018

HundrED

I traveled to Helsinki, Finland last week for the HundrED Summit. An amazing group of  gathering of inspirational educators from around the world participated exchanging ideas, sharing work, and learning from each other. And, learn did I do! Below are a few photos with more information and details to come – just as soon as my jet lag is behind me and I catch up on my sleep! You can start by going to the HundrED site and see the live streamed recordings from all three days.

Visit to a music class on Tuesday

Lindsay Pinchbeck and I were selected as Ambassadors for HundrED

Finland Minister of Education Sanni Grahn-Laasonen

Young people were present and their voices were loud and clear!

There were amazing presentations with thoughtful ideas including this one by Ilkka Paananen, CEO of Supercell

 

 

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Maranacook Middle School

November 8, 2018

The Labor Mural

Best known as the Labor Mural, artwork created by Judy Taylor, now hangs in the entrance to the Maine State Museum in Augusta. Dan Holman, a team leader for the Acadia Team at Maranacook Middle School applied for the Maine Arts Commission Ticket to Ride funds for a trip to the State Museum. After reviewing the application I was curious about the trip and the details of the lesson/unit.

Dan worked with Joanna Torow the Chief Educator at the Maine State Museum to design a field trip that would coincide with the studies back at school. They took a deep dive look at the meaning behind each of the murals panels.

BACKGROUND

The museum has been working with outside contractors to create a digital kiosk that will allow visitors to have a more in-depth interpretive experience in regards to the mural using additional museum objects, photographs, documents, and oral history. They are interviewing the artist, Judy Taylor, and will include a video of her talking about her process and goals for creating the work.  Through this work, the curator and the museum’s educators have made more connections to the artwork and the exhibits on display, it is these insights they hope to share with the students visiting.

IN PREPARATION

To prepare of the trip, the students read short essays (200 words or less) they have written about each panel. They were excited to hear their personal thoughts on the panel, as an artwork with a very specific goal and as a historic document.

Museum Curator of Historical Collections, Angela Goebel-Bain and Joanna lead a discussion with the students (based on discussion and emails with Dan Holman) in front of the Maine Labor Murals. They talked about the subjects as well as the choices the artist made in what she included in each panel, what she left out, how she choose to depict the subject, tools, and people, and how she deliberately used the foreground and background to extend the storytelling.

BACK AT SCHOOL

Dan plans to have the students work on an journal activity in response to the mural after the discussion at the mural. The students will also be took part in two 30 minute gallery programs focused on either Ice Harvesting, Granite Quarrying, Logging & Lumbering, and a guided tour of the Made in Maine exhibit (19th century work and life in Maine with a focus on textile productions and waterpower).

The mural provides first hand knowledge from an artists’ perspective of so much history – granite quarrying, textile industry, child labor, and wood industry all included images in the mural. It provides the opportunity for the educators – museum and school – to reinforce student learning.

If you’d like to learn more about the museum programs please contact Joanna Torow. If you’d like to learn more about the unit that is underway please contact Dan Holman. Thank you to both for providing information for this blog post and the opportunity to be at the museum during the presentation.

The Maine Arts Commission Ticket to Ride program provides funding to defray the cost of travel for Maine schools wishing to visit Maine arts based venues and events as part of a well-rounded curriculum. The goals of the trip should support student learning and be aligned with the Maine Learning Results Visual and/or Performing Arts standards. Any PK-12 school in Maine with a documented free and reduced lunch student population between 30 and 49 percent is eligible to receive support of up to $300 each school year. Any PK-12 school in Maine with a documented free and reduced lunch student population of 50 percent or greater is eligible to receive support of up to $500 each school year. Applications are accepted throughout the year and funding will be made available approximately one month after they are submitted. Schools may apply more than once a year as long as they are applying to attend a different event, bringing a different student population or have not expended their eligible amount. 

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Journey

November 6, 2018

Learning, learning, learning

Baltimore – I was fortunate to travel to Baltimore last week where I participated in the State Arts Agency annual professional development institute (PDI). It was an outstanding learning opportunity in both the formal sessions and informal conversations to connect with my colleagues who do similar work across the country. They all care deeply about arts education. The purpose of this year’s PDI was to continue to explore issues related to diversity, equity, access and inclusion in arts education by focusing on the intersection of different types of structural inequity and individual and community trauma, and the ways in which arts learning can promote individual and community resilience and improve equitable educational outcomes.

Our guiding question: How can state arts agency (SAA) arts education managers address trauma and individual and community resilience through arts learning? 

It guided us well and we’ve returned to our individual states with knowledge that will impact our roles at each state art agency across the US.

Helsinki, Finland –  I’m in Helsinki this week attending the hundrED Innovation Summit. Lindsay Pinchbeck, founder and director of Sweet Tree Arts, and I were invited to attend the HundrED summit in Finland after recently being selected as Ambassadors for the program. We are excited about the learning opportunity.

You can attend virtually – the event is being streamed online. If you can participate please REGISTER!

It is Education Week in Finland so I have the opportunity to spend time in schools. I’m looking forward to learning more about their education program and specifically arts education. Fact: I learned recently that Finland has more heavy metal bands per capita than anywhere else in the world.

Finland is celebrating their hundred year birthday and the summit brings together educators from around the world to learn from each other. I’m looking forward to meeting the innovators; among them Pasi Sahlberg.

What is HundrED?

HundrED.org is a not-for-profit organization that discovers inspiring innovations in K12 education. HundrED’s goal is to help improve education and inspire a grassroots movement through encouraging pedagogically sound, ambitious innovations to spread across the world.

The purpose of education is to help every child flourish, no matter what happens in life. In a fast-changing world, education must adapt to keep up. The world is full of inspiring innovations, but they can struggle to spread beyond their immediate environments. That’s why HundrED discovers, researches and shares impactful and scalable K12 innovations with the world, for free.

I hope you will have a chance to look at the HundrED website and check out their resources. Of course, I will be sharing my learning on the blog.

Education Week

Helsinki Education Week is an annual, week-long festival with a dual purpose: to make visible all of the exemplary work done in the capital’s schools, while also learning lessons from the rest of the world by collaborating with international education specialists visiting the city. The Helsinki Education Week’s lead organizer is the City of Helsinki and its Education Department and its official partners are HundrED and Helsingin Sanomat.

Embracing Education in All Schools 

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Monte Selby

November 2, 2018

Keynoter at MAMLE

On October 18 and 19 the annual conference for the Maine Association for Middle Level Education (MAMLE) was held at Point Lookout. Educator and teaching artist Monte Selby provided the keynote. It was filled with thought provoking ideas and lots of music. Monte’s 22 year old son Martin joined him and provided a wonderful addition to the presentation.

Monte has a long history in education including serving as a school principal. He presently spends a lot of time in classrooms and schools in Maine and across the country making music with students. He’s written and performed songs with over 39,000 students around the world.

Below is a collaborative song he wrote with middle schoolers.

LIGHTEN UP

DON’T LOOK AT ME WITH THAT TONE OF VOICE

WHEN YOU CALL THE KETTLE CORN THAT’S A TASTY CHOICE

STICKS AND STONES MAY BREAK MY BONES BACK

THE GRASS ISN’T GREENER TO BE EXACT

BECAUSE WORDS DO HURT JILL AND THATS A FACT JACK!

THEY BUILD UP FENCES WITH A BAD IMPACT

AND HENCE. IT’S COMMON SENSE

MAYBE WE ALL NEED TO LIGHTEN UP

LEAVE MORE ROOM FOR LESS SERIOUS

ENJOY OTHER PEOPLE AS PEOPLE FOR WHO THEY ARE

TREAT’M LIKE AN ALL-STAR

GREET OTHER PEOPLE THE WAY YOU WANT TO EAT PIE

WHAT GOES AROUND COMES BACK EMPTY

IF YOU SHARE AND THAT’S FINE

AN APPLE A DAY MAKES AN EMPTY TREE

THERE’S NO “I” IN TEAM BUT THERE’S A YOU AND THERE’S A ME

LIFE’S NOT ABOUT WAITING FOR THE STORM TO PASS

RAIN HAS A RHYTHM IF YOU’RE WILLING TO DANCE

LET’S TRY!  TO THE RHYTHM OF LIFE

MAYBE WE ALL NEED TO LIGHTEN UP

LEAVE MORE ROOM FOR LESS SERIOUS

ENJOY OTHER PEOPLE AS PEOPLE FOR WHO THEY ARE

TREAT’M LIKE AN ALL-STAR

HATERS GONNA HATE.  FAKERS GONNA FAKE

BREAKERS  GONNA SHAKE SHAKE SHAKE

BUT DON’T HATE THE PLUNGER JUST HATE THE STOOL

LIFE’S A GARDEN, SO DIG IT, IT’S COOL AND FREE

DON’T LET YOUR FLAWS DEFINE YOUR FUN

YOU’RE A BOOK WITH A COVER I DON’T INTEND TO JUDGE

EMOTION DOESN’T FALL FAR FROM THE TREE

THERE’S A STORY IN YOU THAT RELATES TO ME

SO IT’S HEY DIDDLE DIDDLE THIS SONG’S BEEN A RIDDLE

LISTEN REAL CLOSE THERE’S A LESSON

TO TICKLE YOUR BRAIN.  I HOPE YOU GAIN, THAT,

MAYBE WE ALL NEED TO LIGHTEN UP

LEAVE MORE ROOM FOR LESS SERIOUS

ENJOY OTHER PEOPLE AS PEOPLE FOR WHO THEY ARE

TREAT’M LIKE AN ALL-STAR

HOW THIS CAME ABOUT

“Lighten Up” is a song Monte wrote with 7th graders (about 100 students) who were on an interdisciplinary team called the All Stars. Each student wrote down lyric ideas in response to the question, “What could everyone on the All Star team do to help make this a great place to come to school?” They shared ideas and posted their words all around the room, but they were not finding a creative theme to serve as a main idea. As they continued brainstorming, Monte guided them to famous quotes or familiar phrases to generate ideas. One student made a mistake with his quote when he shared his mother’s favorite line, “Don’t look at me with that tone of voice”. The mistake sparked a creative idea to build their song lyrics with mash-ups of multiple phrases that would express their desire for 7th graders on the All Star Team to “Lighten Up.”

Now that you know the history I suggest that you go back to the top of this blog post and read the song once again.

Monte and students at the national student council conference last summer – performing a song they wrote for the conference.

To watch a group of middle school songwriters in action, Monte has shared a recent video that comes from a songwriting residency with 6th graders. They decided that the best way for them to become the greatest group of 6th graders in the history of the school, it would require everyone to allow each individual to “be yourself”.  The song is called, “You Be You”. You can see also see Monte’s son in the video.

The most popular song written with students in Maine comes from a group of 2nd graders at Mabel I. Wilson elementary. Their song, “Animal Habitat” reflects what they learned from an engaging science unit. Listen for the enthusiastic voices of over 100 2nd graders contributing to the chorus of their own original song!

mp3 of “Lighten Up”

Monte has a doctorate degree in School Leadership so he not only has the knowledge and experience to write songs with students but he has an understanding of administrators. He is a Grammy Award winning songwriter, recording artist, educator, author, and speaker. You can learn more about Monte at his WEBSITE and contact him directly by EMAIL.

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Poetry for Halloween

October 28, 2018

Access poems to compliment what you’re teaching

The Poetry Foundation is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. (taken from their website) The Poetry Foundation is the publisher of Poetry magazine.

If you’re looking for a huge selection of poems to incorporate into lessons take a look at what they provide. Especially for the Halloween season, you might want a poem to share with your students. I’ve provided two below and some information about each one that arrived in my email by the National Endowment for the Arts/Poetry Out Loud program. If you’d like more information about several Halloween poems they are AVAILABLE HERE.

Halloween Party by Kenn Nisbett

Here’s a poem for the younger set. Written in a meter and rhythm that readers of children’s poetry will recognize, this poem is in the voice of a young boy dressed as Dracula, who finds himself in the scariest place any kid can imagine: looking stupid in front of his entire class.

Scariest lines:

The other kids stare like I’m some kind of freak—
the Halloween party is not till next week.

Costume how-to: In this case, how about a party how-to? It’s elementary school so, okay, there are limits. Nothing too scary, but candy and costumes, a few games, and then more candy. In the classroom, everyone’s doing the Monster Mash and sifting through their loot. Fun and not too freaky. But down the hall? The scariest place in any school is the inside of the teachers’ lounge.

Creepy fact: According to multiple sources, Kenn Nesbitt, while being a poet, is a completely normal, well-adjusted human being.

Originally Published: October 26th, 2006

Halloween Party

We’re having a Halloween party at school.
I’m dressed up like Dracula. Man, I look cool!
I dyed my hair black, and I cut off my bangs.
I’m wearing a cape and some fake plastic fangs.
I put on some makeup to paint my face white,
like creatures that only come out in the night.
My fingernails, too, are all pointed and red.
I look like I’m recently back from the dead.
My mom drops me off, and I run into school
and suddenly feel like the world’s biggest fool.
The other kids stare like I’m some kind of freak—
the Halloween party is not till next week.
“Halloween Party.” © 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt. Reprinted from When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (© 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt) with permission from Meadowbrook Press.
Source: When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (2005)

Grieving his dead love, Lenore, the speaker is disturbed by a ceaseless tapping at the door. He opens it to first—eek!—nothing. Then comes the raven, who stirs and intensifies the speaker’s grief by croaking out, again and again, the fateful single word “nevermore.” See how Poe uses repetition to build the poem’s momentum, how the meter accelerates with your breath. No balm awaits: the raven remains, terrorizing and haunting. Will Poe’s hero escape it?

Scariest lines:

Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown
before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
Then the bird said “Nevermore.”

Costume how-to: The Bereft. Dark pouches under bloodshot eyes, hair and clothes unkempt, with a bit of paranoia tossed in to underscore your inconsolable sorrow. (Hint: Have a paper due? Pull an all-nighter or two.) Must-have accessory: The raven (stuffed?), of course, with its dark, oily feathers and beady eyes.

Creepy fact: The cause of Poe’s death remains a mystery, but has been variously attributed to alcoholism, cholera, syphilis, brain disease, and, recently, rabies.

The Raven

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
    While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
            Only this and nothing more.”
    Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
    Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
    From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
            Nameless here for evermore.
    And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
    So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
    “’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;—
            This it is and nothing more.”
    Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
    But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
    And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—
            Darkness there and nothing more.
    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
    But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
    And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—
            Merely this and nothing more.
    Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
    “Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
      Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
            ’Tis the wind and nothing more!”
    Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
    Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
    But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
            Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;
    For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
    Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door—
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
            With such name as “Nevermore.”
    But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
    Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
    Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
            Then the bird said “Nevermore.”
    Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store
    Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
    Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
            Of ‘Never—nevermore’.”
    But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
    Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
    Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
            Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”
    This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;
    This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
    On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,
But whose velvet-violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,
            She shall press, ah, nevermore!
    Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
    “Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
    Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
    Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—
    On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—
    Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
    It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!” I shrieked, upstarting—
“Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!
    Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
    Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
    And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,
    And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
            Shall be lifted—nevermore!
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Carol Trimble Award

October 16, 2018

Kate Smith – CONGRATULATIONS!

During the pre-MICA Arts Education conference at USM two weeks ago the Carol Trimble Award was presented to Kate Smith. The award is presented to an educator who contributes exemplary service to the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative/Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) for their commitment, collaborative spirit and contributions. Carol Trimble was an amazing advocate for arts education. She retired as Executive Director from the Maine Alliance for Arts Education. The award was established in 2013 to honor Carol and her work.

Kate with one of her third grade classes with her Carol Trimble award.

Kate is an energetic music teacher currently teaching music to 430 preK-third grade students at Central Elementary School in South Berwick, Maine where she has been since 2003. Kate earned her music education degree from USM and a Master’s degree in Technology in Education from Lesley University. Kate was honored as 2014 York County Teacher of the Year for her passion for innovation and creativity. Kate serves as a teacher leader and design team member for the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative, the Parade Coordinator for South Berwick’s annual Lanternfest and a coordinator for Central School’s farm-to-table program. Kate lives in southern Maine with her amazing husband and three children.

Music Educator Kris Bisson, Kate Smith, teaching artist Brian Evans-Jones at the MALI Mega 2018

Kate is well respected in the education world, not only for music but for her work continuing work with the outdoor classroom at Central School. Kate is a remarkable grant writer and many learners of all ages have benefited in her school and community. She has presented many workshops on a variety of topics for conferences at the local, regional and state level. Her most recent was for the Pre-Maine International Conference on the Arts (MICA) leading the music/dance session and at the MICA facilitating a panel discussion with teaching artists and PK-12 arts teachers.

Kate presenting at the MALI summer institute 2017

In 2014 Kate became a MALI Teacher Leader and willingly shared her enthusiasm for learning. In 2015 she was part of a MALI team who traveled to  Washington, D.C. for the Teach to Lead Summit. Kate enthusiastically embraced the Logic Model the team was introduced to and ever since has guided the MALI work. Kate is so engaged in how the model can impact each of us she often stays up late writing logic models. She is the
“Logic Model Guru”. Her excitement of having the then US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan sit at our table at the summit was contagious. In 2015 Kate became a member of the team who guides the MALI work where she continually gives 100% with every task and responsibility. Kate has co-led the work with the MALI Teaching Artist Leaders introducing them to the many facets of teaching and learning. Her experience working with teaching artists in her school/community has enhanced learning opportunities for many. Kate is dependable, collaborative, honest, a life-long learner, has high expectations, fun to be around, and totally committed to whatever she takes on.

I had the pleasure of traveling to Islesford with Kate at the end of the summer to meet and visit with Ashley Bryan. It was a remarkable and very special gift. Kate was so inspired that on her return she incorporated what she learned to pass on to her students and colleagues. Kate has the ability to process quickly and put ideas into action without hesitation.

With Arne Duncan, Teach to Lead Summit, summer 2015

Catherine Ring, co-founder of MALI, Executive Director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education and Visual Art Educator, has worked closely with Kate and said the following about her: Kate is an inspirational leader for arts education. She is an intelligent and passionate advocate for the arts and it’s been a pleasure to work with her for the past 6 years at the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative.

Kate took a moment out of her busy schedule to answer a couple of questions for the Maine Arts Education blog readers.

On Islesford visiting Ashley Bryan

What’s your favorite part about teaching? How do I narrow it down!?!  When you see students not only master what you’ve taught them but then own their learning. Hearing students hum, sing, or whistle the songs I’ve taught them. The joy on my students’ faces when they are creating, performing, listening and responding to music. Hearing parents say how much they love hearing their children sing in the car, at the table, in the bathroom, or in bed when they are supposed to be asleep. Knowing the children are making precious memories by sharing their singing, playing and dancing with their parents (and grandparents!) makes my heart sing!

Kate Smith, 2018 Maine Teacher of the Year and MALI music educator Kaitlin Young, Argy Nestor, Pre-MICA 2018

What are you most proud of from your career as an educator? The relationships I have made. Someone once said, in order to raise yourself up you must surround yourself with people you aspire to follow. I have been able to learn from incredible educators from across the state and region through the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative, the Maine Teacher of the Year Association, USM, Lesley University, the Marshwood School District and countless other networks. There have been people who challenge me, inspire me, stretch me, believe in me. They’ve saved me a place at the table, encouraged me to use my voice, to amplify my students’ voices and have taught me to expect more from our legislators and policy makers.

CONGRATULATIONS KATE SMITH – this years awardee for the Carol Trimble Award!

Previous recipients include:

  • Catherine Ring and Rob Westerberg
  • Bronwyn Sale
  • Jeffrey Beaudry
  • Charlie Johnson

 

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