Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

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December 2, 2016

Sweet Tree Arts – Friday, December 9

Brendan Taafee performs at Sweet Tree Arts, 4 Church Street, Hope. He will bring Crankies and Ballads from Appalachia and Africa. Learn more about Brendan by CLICKING HERE.

 

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Wondering what Crankie art is?

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MALI Mega USM, Registration Open

November 15, 2016

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI)

REGISTRATION is NOW OPEN for the MALI Mega USM. During this school year there are six Mega Conferences planned. All the information is located on the Maine Arts Commission website at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MALI-Mega-Regionals. Or click on the Mega (underlined) below for information specific to each location.

Dates and Locations

mali_h_color_100ppiEach site will have different sessions offered so you may wish to attend more than one Mega. Sessions will be provided by MALI Teacher Leaders and Teaching Artist Leaders. In addition, almost all sites will have technology offerings offered by MLTI Apple staff. A portion of the afternoon will feature a Teaching Artist and information on the statewide arts education census that was conducted during the 2015-16 school year. The report will be officially released in December.

The cost to attend each Mega is $25 (unless otherwise indicated). Contact hours for full participation – 5.5 contact hours. The Megas provide multiple opportunities for the Maine Arts education community to engage in professional development specific to come together to deepen our knowledge, make connections, and learn from each other!

SESSIONS MEGA USM

SESSION I

The Role of the Digital Portfolio in Arts Advocacy, Assessment, and Student Ownership Learning

Introduction to the digital portfolio. How to implement student centered digital portfolios that promote student ownership of learning and assessment. Grades 7-12

Jackie Bousquet Traip Academy Visual Art

 

“Making Art History Come to Life with iBooks Author”

 Dive into iBooks Author to harness the power of developing multi-modal, Multi-Touch iBooks. You’ll learn features which make iBooks come to life for learners by incorporating audio files, 3D widgets, image glossaries, study cards, jailbreaking templates, and much more. Be prepared to create an art history chapter together. You can also use this app for making comics and graphic novels or creating art portfolios. This session is great for MLTI beginners and experts. MLTI MacBooks with iBooks Author preinstalled is encouraged. Grades 7-12
Lindsey Carnes MLTI Apple Learning Specialist

Student’s Reflective Voice: Using the Artist Statement

This workshop, participants will explore the ways in which student voice and understanding within visual art creation can be expanded upon with the use of reflective writing using an Artist Statement. Grades 7-12

Melanie Crowe Marshwood Middle School, Grades 6-8 Visual Art

 

Assessing Singing in the Primary Grades

This workshop offers methodical strategies for assessing young children’s singing. Assessment logistics and tried and trusted rubrics will be provided as examples, along with ideas for formative assessment including self assessment. Grades K-4

Patti Gordan Raymond Elementary School, Grade K-4 Music

 

More Cowbell

Playing and composing songs on your own is a blast for some, however there’s something special about making music in collaboration with other like-minded folks that just can’t be beat. In this hands-on, music making session, participants will use GarageBand to learn the basics of song writing and music production. Participants will have plenty of time to explore and experience the fun of collaborative music creation. Musicians of any and all skill levels are welcome. Make sure to bring your Mac and/or iOS device with GarageBand installed. All grade levels.
Tim Hart MLTI Apple Learning Specialist

 

Using Multiple Intelligences to Teach Students with Disabilities

Learn how teaching using multiple intelligence can be a way to unlock learning goals for students with disabilities. All grade levels. All content.

Brigid Rankowski Teaching Artist

 

SLOs – Student Learning Objectives

The workshop will give a brief overview of Chapter 180, and focus on writing and implementing SLOs. Time will be provided to practice writing SLOs and receive feedback  All grade levels. All content.

MaryEllen Schaper Bonney Eagle Middle School, Grades 6-8 Dance

 

SESSION II

Stars and Stairs

Stars and Stairs, Where am I now and Where am I going? How can the use of Stars and Stairs in your classroom help to inform you and your students of their learning progression and actively engage them in the learning process. This will be a round table discussion. Looking at your standards and your curriculum how can you use the Stars and Stairs model in your classroom.  All grade levels.  All content.

Samantha Armstrong Paris Elementary School and Hebron Elementary
Schools, Grades K-6 Visual Art

Writing Across the Curriculum in a Performing Arts Classroom

Writing is a life skill that is of critical importance to our students.  I will share ways in which I have incorporated writing composition and critical responses in to my dance classroom. All grades levels. All content.

Emma Campbell Thornton Academy Dance

 

Including Students with Disabilities in Your Art Classroom Using iMovie

Use stations and sites fostering independence to help students collect assets for creating art infused iMovie productions. This session will showcase how a green screen and some photos can provide opportunities for all learners to showcase their creative side. MLTI MacBooks with the most current version of iMovie is encouraged. All content. All grade levels.

Lindsey Carnes MLTI Apple Learning Specialist

Reflections on Standards Based teaching and Learning

In this workshop participants will discuss ways to connect students with standards, methods of to make SBL visible for students and the use of a matrix to document teaching opportunities that are standards based. Grades 6-12

Jennie Driscoll Brunswick High School Visual Art

Making 8-bit Art

Beginning with early Atari and Nintendo video games, the 8-bit aesthetic has been a part of our culture for over 30 years. No longer just nostalgia art, contemporary 8-bit artists and chiptunes musicians have elevated the form to new levels of creativity and cultural reflection. In this session, we will focus on tools that assist in creating 8-bit images, animations, and music.  Please bring your MLTI MacBook. All grade levels.

Tim Hart MLTI Apple Learning Specialist

“Something from Nothing” or Costuming on a Budget

Hot glue, curtains, table cloths, children’s sleds, and ribbon – what do they all have in common? They can be ingeniously used to create authentic costumes for all plays.  Armed with this knowledge, you can devise a lesson in the designing of costumes for the stage for your students. If time permits, participants can brainstorm possible resources and ways to include students. Grades 9-12

Jean Phillips Wiscasset High School Theatre

Music Curriculum SLOs

Building SLO and Data Points from your Music Curriculum. Grades K-8

Cynthia Streznewski Woolwich Central School, Grades K-8 Music

 

About MALI

In the spring of 2011, the Maine Department of Education launched the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI). During the summer of 2015 after gathering feedback from the initiative’s Teacher Leaders the name was changed to the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI). Presently in phase six, the Maine Arts Commission continues to provide professional learning opportunities for educators. The mission was changed to reflect the present work underway. The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) is committed to the development of teacher leaders to ensure deep understanding and meaningful implementation of high quality teaching, learning, and assessment in the arts.

Thank you to the MALI partners for your collaborative work with MALI: Maine Department of Education, Maine Art Education Association, Maine Music Educators Association, New England Institute for Teacher Education, University of Southern Maine, and UMaine Performing Arts.

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Camden Hills Regional High School

November 8, 2016

Raising Our Voices in Camden Hills Regional High Schools’ Sister Act

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Program cover Rafi Baeza

Raise Your Voice! becomes the central theme of the current musical production at Camden Hills Regional High School’s production of Sister Act. Based upon the hit 1992 Touchstone Pictures’ movie, and with original music by Alan Menken, this upbeat musical is sure to have audience members tapping their toes. When Deloris Van Cartier (Rebekah Schade) takes refuge in a convent after having witnessed a murder at the hands of her boyfriend Curtis (Nick Watts), she discovers that she has a gift that is even greater than her star-struck dreams of being on the stage – sharing the power of music. As the nuns discover the joy of raising their voices and “shaking their booties” they, including Deloris, also begin to discover a new strength and resolve inside of themselves.

Photo Marti Stone

Musical theater, with its costumes, lights, dancing, and amazing sets is a spectacle for the whole community to enjoy. Yet parents of impressionable young children are cautioned that the directors have rated this show PG 13 for violence and suggestive language. Some children may simply enjoy the chance to see live theater; and parents may find that the story line is a springboard for important conversations. In Sister Act, musical theater becomes instructive as well as entertaining. The subject of domestic abuse becomes an undercurrent in an otherwise light and humorous story. The writers have presented this serious topic in a comedic manner by distracting the listener with zany “thug” characters. However, as we look closer at the material, we find that the theme of “raising one’s voice” is the lesson embedded in the story line. Within the plot, tension mounts in the finale of the show as Curtis discovers where Deloris is hiding and makes plans to “keep her silent” for good. In solidarity, the sisters of the convent (including the rigid character of Mother Superior (Molly Mann)) raise their voices and make a vow to protect Deloris.   In addition, Deloris finds her own voice, and takes a powerful stand against Curtis – with the strength of her sisters, she is able to “raise her voice” and stand up to the bully. The theme of justice prevails, as we find out what happens to Curtis and his thugs in the final number.

Photo Marti Stone

On Broadway, Sister Act was nominated for five Tony Awards, including Best Musical. With Lyrics by Glenn Slater, Book by Cheri and Bill Steinkellner, and Additional Book Material by Douglas Carter Beane, Sister Act is being presented by CHRHS in special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). www.MTIshows.com

The CHRHS production of Sister Act will play November 4, 5, 11, 12 at 7:00 PM and November 6 at 2:00 PM.   Advance ticket sales are $12 for Reserved (front section) seats and $10/$6 for General Admission. At-the-door prices increase to $15/$12/$8. Tickets can be purchased in advance online at stromtickets.com or reserved by calling 236-7800 ext 282. Email stromtickets@gmail.com for ticket orders and more information.

 

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Neuroscience and Music

October 30, 2016

New developments in neuroscience can benefit the learning and performance of music

As advancements in neuroscience increasingly illuminate the traditional understanding of the human mind, many of the new insights are also relevant to musicians as well as to music pedagogy. The greater understanding of how intersubjective processes are integral to the development of the right brain has shown how, according to the neuropsychoanalyst Allan Schore, right-brain models can bridge the fields of psychiatry, music, and trauma.

Read the entire article by CLICKING HERE.

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Congratulations Rick!

October 25, 2016

Grammy Music Education

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This is year four that the Recording Academy and the Grammy Foundation is recognizing a music educator with the Grammy Music Educator of the Year Award. This year one of our very own Maine music educators has been nominated and has advanced to being one of the 25 semifinalists. Rick Nickerson is the director of choral activities at Windham High School where he has taught for 30 years. Rick conducts three choirs, teaches music courses and serves as the music coordinator for the district.

Rick at the 2011 Statewide Arts Education Conference

Rick at the 2011 Statewide Arts Education Conference

The award recognizes “educators who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education.” This is the second time Rick has been nominated, first in 2013, when he advanced to the quarterfinals. Ten finalists will announced in December and one person will be selected to receive the award and be recognized at the 59th Grammy Awards ceremony on February 12, 2017.

Rick has been recognized in the past as the Maine Music Educator of the Year, Maine Distinguished Choral Director of the Year and was runner-up for Maine Teacher of the Year.

In 2011 Rick’s choir provided an excellent performance at the opening of the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative Statewide Arts Education conference, Arts Teachers Leading the Way Back to the Future: Arts Assessment for Learning.

Congratulations to Rick and his Windham school district colleagues and community who support the work of music education! We’ll be waiting to hear in December if Rick makes it to the final 10 considered for the Grammy Music Educator of the Year Award! YAHOOOOOOOO!

Rick conducting at the opening of the 2011 Statewide Arts Education conference

Rick conducting at the opening of the 2011 Statewide Arts Education conference

Rick conducting at the opening of the 2011 Statewide Arts Education conference

Rick conducting at the opening of the 2011 Statewide Arts Education conference

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Gospel Singer

October 21, 2016

Subway in New York

Whether it is morning, noon or night when you are at this blog post take the time to … stop, breathe deeply, and watch this one minute and 2 seconds video of a man singing in the subway in New York City.

When we wake each morning we never know what will come our way when we get to school. Certainly there are situations that are out of our control. Some of them make us uncomfortable, challenge us, and provide the opportunity to grow. Sometimes they bring us a smile and even make us laugh uncontrollably. The one thing we do get to control is our attitude; how we wish to be and to respond to whatever students, parents, and colleagues say and whatever may happen. That’s why I say “make it a great day”. What will your attitude be today?

 

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Bob Dylan

October 19, 2016

2016 Nobel Prize in Literature

I graduated from high school in 1972. Many of you are aware of the following information, perhaps first hand, since you were growing up during that time as well. It was a period filled with challenges and turbulence. The Vietnam War started in 1955, escalated in the 60’s in response to military clashes. Even though the military fighting involvement ended in 1973 the war officially ended in 1975. The following year North and South Vietnam were reunified.

Bruce Aydelotte, my high school art teacher demonstrating pen and ink drawing with me wearing my Mondrian dress. You can read the post that includes this photo from March 2009 at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2009/03/05/thank-a-teacher/.

Bruce Aydelotte, my high school art teacher demonstrating pen and ink drawing with me wearing my Mondrian dress. You can read the post that includes this photo from March 2009 at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2009/03/05/thank-a-teacher/.

Bell bottom jeans, beads, headbands, fringe, tie-dyed t-shirts, leather sandals, Dr. Scholl’s wood-bottom sandals, and leather Earth shoes were popular attire. French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent created “The Mondrian Collection” as a homage to the work of several modernistic artists.

The Woodstock Festival was held in 1969 at a 600-acre cattle farm in the Catskills (NY) with an audience of more than 400,000 people. I have a brother who was at Woodstock for the pivotal moment in popular music history. Many of the songs performed at Woodstock by the 32 acts were protest songs.

Some of the musicians and artists of that time period were The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg. Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin as well (both died from drug related deaths).

Dylan did not perform at Woodstock but his song The Times They Are a-Changin’ documents the early-’60s turbulence and became an anthem for change. Most interesting, Dylan never claimed to be a protest singer.

What does Dylan and The Times Are a-Changin’ have to do with me and my high school graduation? My class sang the song at graduation – it was our small way of recognizing (and for some of us supporting) what was going on, even though we were at the tail end of it. My older brothers were in the thick of it so I was very aware at a family level of what was happening.

Consequently, I was gleeful to hear the recent news that Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize for Literature. So wonderful to know that he is the first musician to be recognized with this award makes it even more special!

If you’re around my age you may have a personal Dylan connection yourself. If you’re younger you may have (or will have) a personal connection to music or an artist from your past. Hopefully the memory will be as sweet as this is for me. I couldn’t let this opportunity pass without sharing my Dylan story. Enjoy Bob Dylan singing The Times They Are A-Changin in this Youtube video.

 Below is the article that came out on the AP by CBS on October 13, 2016.

STOCKHOLM — American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan won the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature on Thursday, a stunning announcement that for the first time bestowed the prestigious award on a musician.

The Swedish Academy cited Dylan for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”

Reporters and others gathered for the announcement at the academy’s headquarters in Stockholm’s Old Town reacted with a loud cheer as his name was read out.

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

Dylan, who turned 75 in May, had been mentioned in the Nobel speculation for years, but few experts expected the academy to extend the prestigious award to a genre such as popular music.

The academy’s permanent secretary, Sara Danius, said that while Dylan performs his poetry in the form of songs, that’s no different from the ancient Greeks, whose works were often performed to music.

“Bob Dylan writes poetry for the ear,” she said. “But it’s perfectly fine to read his works as poetry.”

Dylan was born on May 24, 1941, in Duluth, Minnesota. He grew up in a Jewish middle-class family. He’s the first American winner of the Nobel literature prize since Toni Morrison in 1992.

By his early 20s, he had taken the folk music world by storm. “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are A-Changin” became anthems for the anti-war and civil rights movements of the 1960s. Dylan was also awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for his contributions to music and American culture.

The literature award was the last of this year’s Nobel Prizes to be announced. The six awards will be handed out on Dec. 10, the anniversary of prize founder Alfred Nobel’s death in 1896.

Earlier this year, renowned photographer Ken Regan released a limited edition book capturing rare, intimate images of Dylan on tour.

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