Archive for the ‘Opportunity’ Category

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Maine’s Poet Laureate

May 17, 2021

Stuart Kestenbaum finishes five-year term

The Maine Arts Commission requests applications to select a new state poet laureate for a five-year term. Stuart Kestenbaum will turn over the reigns. He is no stranger to visual arts teachers who have attended the state art education conference at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. “We are so grateful to Stu for his wonderful work at Poet Laureate,” said Arts Commission Executive Director, David Greenham. Greenham will facilitate the process for selecting Maine’s next poet laureate. “We see this as a wonderful opportunity to recognize another member of Maine’s thriving community of poets,” he added.

Maine’s Poet Laureate position is an appointment designed to promote poetry throughout the state while honoring a Maine poet whose work can inspire an understanding and appreciation of the craft of poetry for the people of our state. 

Current Poet Laureate Stuart Kestenbaum completes his five-year term in 2021. Kestenbaum, a resident of Deer Isle, has used his position to share poetry in many different mediums, including his Poems from Here collaboration with Maine Public, which features a new Maine poem each week. Kestenbaum is the author of five collections of poems, most recently How to Start Over (Deerbrook Editions, 2019). He is also the author of the essay collection The View from Here (Brynmorgen Press, 2012).

The poet laureate position was established by Maine statute in 1995. The specific duties are minimal to ensure incumbents have maximum freedom to work on their own projects during their tenure. While the position does not include a stipend, all expenses are paid for

appearances and programs, which include, an annual lecture and reading of his or her poetry; participation in the Maine Arts Commission’s administration of the national Poetry Out Loud project; as well as appearances and events to broaden appreciation and understanding of, and participation in, poetry in Maine communities. Each poet laureate brings a different emphasis to the position.

To be considered for this appointment, poets must be full-time Maine residents and have a distinguished body of poetic work. Applicants must submit up to five poems, totaling no more than 10 pages, as well as a one-page statement outlining your vision for your public role as poet laureate and a copy of your resume no later than June 1, 2021.

APPLY TO BE THE NEXT MAINE POET LAUREATE

Maine Poet Laureate review committee

Janet Mills, Governor (and poet)

Samaa Abdurraqib, Maine Humanities Council

Susan Minot, Author and Poet

Gibson Fay-LeBlanc, Maine Writers and Publishers

James Ritter, Maine State Library

Stuart Kestenbaum

To learn the history of Maine’s Poet Laureate CLICK HERE. If you have questions, please contact David Greenham, Executive Director of the Maine Arts Commission at david.greenham@maine.gov.

Maine’s Poet Laureates

Kate Barnes (1996-1999)

Baron Wormser (2000-2005)

Betsy Sholl (2006-2011)

Wesley McNair (2011 – 2016)

Stuart Kestenbaum (2016 – 2021)

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Maine Art Ed Association

May 15, 2021

Updates

Maine Art Education Association is on the move continuing to provide excellent art education learning opportunities. The latest two on the horizon are listed below. If you’re not a member of Maine’s professional visual art education association consider being a member today and click this link to learn about the different membership options.

MAEA 2021 Summer Retreat at Pilgrim Lodge, Cobbosseecontee Lake: August 02nd-05th, 2021

Allie Rimkunas, Summer Retreat Coordinator, will advise us of the details of this wonderful opportunity to wind down and simply create our personal artworks on the shores of Cobbosseecontee!  Details to follow in an email Newsflash!

MAEA re-stArt 2021 Fall Satellite Conference:  

September 17th and 18th, 2021

As our MAEA Fall Haystack Conference will return in 2022, 

Anthony Lufkin and Brooke Holland, Haystack Conference Coordinators, will advise us of the 2021 program and the multiple satellite locations throughout Maine that will be available for studio opportunities!  There may be virtual opportunities as well.  

Details to follow in an email Newsflash.

JOIN LINKS

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Music at Camden Hills Regional High School

May 12, 2021

Upcoming Performance

On May 14, 6:00PM a cast of 19 students at Camden Hills Regional High School will perform their first live production since the pandemic began. The performance will take place outside and run for 1 hour, 20 minutes without an intermission.

“To sing again means so much. These voices are beautiful, and it’s been a hard year not being able to sing in school, and we’re just getting back into it. It feels very hopeful,” said Kimberly Murphy, who is directing the production.

The school is producing ‘The Theory of Relativity,’ a new musical by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill.

“I just love making music with other people. It’s one of my favorite things to do,” senior Julianna Day.

LEARN MORE ON WABI5 NEWS

Cast of The Theory of Relativity Photo by Marti Stone

PRESS RELEASE

Camden Hills Regional HS presents a Spring Musical – May 7, 8, 14, 15

Mark your calendars for a live show! Spring is here, and we are moving the singing to an outdoor stage. Known for its large musical productions in the fall of each year, Camden Hills Regional HS is taking advantage of the chance to sing outside and put on a show before this year’s seniors graduate. The school is producing The Theory of Relativity, a new musical by Neil Bartram and Brian Hill. This contemporary musical explores the many aspects of human relationships and love, through solos, ensemble singing, and small vignettes. The show runs for approximately one hour and 20 min. without an intermission. The genre of the show is more like a musical revue than a traditional musical with changing scenes and costumes; therefore, it seemed the perfect fit for a musical that could be presented to an outdoor audience during COVID times.

Directed by Kimberly Murphy, with accompaniment by joani mitchell, technical direction by Tom Heath and choreography by Gretchen Henderson; a full cast of performers and tech crew are pulling together to create a unique theatrical experience.

The cast of 19 performers features nine seniors: Cynthia Allen, Kevin Bergelin, Julianna Day, Isaiah Doble, Ruben Feldman, Andi Hammond, Wesley Henderson, Nathaniel Stanley, Kate Upham. The ensemble cast is completed by George Bickham, Caleb Butler, Nora Finck, Isabella Kinney, Joshua Kohlstrom, Audrey Leavitt, Alice Moskovitz, Malaya Moores, Millie Pearse and Sam Skovran.

Oliver Worner, as the student producer, is taking on many roles including helping with plans to keep audience members socially distant, setting up an Eventbrite page for tickets, and being the coordinator of cast and tech needs. Additional techies include Elias Porter (sound), Jasper Berryman-Moore, Declan Buchanan, Katelynn Colbry, Emily Frank, and Brian Bland.

Tickets must be purchased in advance. There will be no “at-the-door” ticket sales. The show dates for the outdoor event are May 7 and 8 at 6:00 PM (with a rain date of May 9th at 2:00 PM), and May 14 and 15 at 6:00 PM (with a rain date of May 16th at 2:00 PM). Audience members will be asked to remain masked for the entire show, and keep a social distance of 6 ft. Due to COVID restrictions, seating charts with assigned spaces will be created in advance. There are also limited drive-in style tickets that will allow audience members to watch the show from the comfort of their car, and hear the music broadcast over an AM radio signal.

Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Monday, April 26th. If you have ticketing questions, contact Oliver Worner at oliver.worner22@fivetowns.net
The link for the Eventbrite page is: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chrhs-theory-of-relativity-tickets-148649142587

The theme of the show is about human relationships – funny, serious, loving, sad, or poignant. Parents of young children should be advised that there are mature themes and content in some of the songs. If you have specific questions about the show, please contact Kim Murphy at kim.murphy@fivetowns.net.

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Narraguagus Jr/Sr High School

May 11, 2021

6th Annual Student Art Exhibit

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Influenced by Art Teacher

May 11, 2021

Letter from US Secretary of Education Dr. Miguel A. Cardona

How wonderful that we have an educator in the position of Secretary of Education at the federal level who was influenced by an art teacher during his elementary education. I urge you to embrace this moment and consider our roles as educators and ask yourself: what can I do to take a leap in moving visual and performing education forward? You have the potential to encourage, challenge and guide learners to wrap their arms around being life long learners of the arts!

I never could predict what might happen in Mr. O’Neil’s art classes; I just knew I couldn’t wait for the next assignment.  Back then I didn’t realize all the ways this dynamic educator, a rare man of color leading our diverse classroom of second graders, was serving as a pioneer and role model for me and my peers in John Barry Elementary School.  But I’ll never forget how his teaching made me feel.  As a second grader, I remember looking up — watching him encourage, challenge and guide us – and thinking: “I want to be like him.”

In the years since embracing that calling and starting my career as a classroom teacher, I’ve kept that sense of purpose and wonder.  And my goal in all the administrative roles I’ve held is to facilitate great teaching and learning: to support and expand the transformative impact that skilled, caring classroom teachers have for students, schools, and communities.

Every day America’s teachers change lives, and every day those lives change the world.

Dr. Miguel A. Cardona US Secretary of Education

Now, this truth can seem to recede as you rush to keep up with the day’s intense pace, and your students’ needs and opportunities. Yet, from the first bell on the first day of the school year, you build a relationship with each of them. You learn their strengths and struggles, laugh with them, cry with them, worry over them, cheer for them – and at the end of the school year, help them transition to their next grade level adventure. You know all those experiences – both the academic and life lessons – have changed both you and them for the better.  You empower them to grow in skill and character — expand their understanding of the world and how to shape it — explore their interests and decide where to make their mark.

Teaching is not a job anyone just falls into. It is mastery of a craft: in fact, the craft that enables all the others. In my experience, great teachers are also quintessential lifelong learners. You use your command of learning science, your insights into your students’ unique needs and aptitudes, as well as the lessons of the past, the realities of the present and the inspiration, innovation and ingenuity of the future to help each new generation become leaders for today and tomorrow. Throughout the year you support your fellow educators, add to your tools through professional development, provide feedback on assignments, sponsor sports, service learning, clubs and other extracurricular activities, collaborate with parents –in addition to everything you pour into your students during class.

Even in this unprecedented year, you rallied, finding new ways to engage with students. In the face of tragedy, you learned new technologies and built virtual classroom communities, all while caring for yourselves and your own families.  As we heal, recover, and rebuild, this pandemic presents a chance to forge opportunity from crisis and reimagine education on every level. We will use this time to address inequities in our education system, and your contributions will be invaluable.  The work won’t be easy, but the impact of your success will be profound, for students and communities. I urge state, local, and elected officials to make sure classroom teachers have a voice in your plans and efforts to reimagine education; second to parents, they know our students best.

I look forward to learning and listening from you in the days ahead.  And, from all of us at the Department of Education: Happy Teacher Appreciation Week. There’s a reason teacher like Mr. O’Neil – and all of you – are memorable.  There’s a reason student in America’s classrooms watch you share your curiosity, energy and passion for ideas and think, “I want to be like them.”

You are embodiments of possibility, champions of your students’ potential and stewards of their success.

Dr. Miguel A. Cardona, U.S. Secretary of Education.

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MMEA Conference

May 10, 2021

Virtual: May 10-15 – click below image for registration and session info

CLICK HERE FOR SESSIONS AND CLINICIAN BIOS

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION FORM

If you have any questions please email Benjamin M. Potvin MMEA Past President pastpresident@mainemea.org.

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Happpppy Mother’s Day

May 9, 2021

Whether you are a mother or you’re spending time with your mom or remembering your mother today I hope you have a lovely day!

photo credit Argy Nestor
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What’s Your Opinion?

May 9, 2021

Portland Museum of Art


The information below was passed on by retired art teacher and artist Christine Higgins, a member of Union of Maine Visual Artists and ARRT! – Artists’ Rapid Response Team. If you have questions please email Christine at cmjh@megalink.net.

As the Portland Museum of Art considers uses for the building adjacent to PMA, why not have it dedicated to an arts education center focused on Maine’s youth? It could be a fabulous opportunity to offer experiences in all the arts- music, dance, writing, and the visual arts.  Perhaps educators and artist in this state could unite to advocate?

The invitation below is from Alicia Coll, Philanthropy and Campaign Administrator at the Portland Museum of Art.

Please join us for a virtual Zoom PMA Listening Session held especially for Artists with PMA consultant and host Paul Johnson, Principal of Creative Fundraising Advisors, on Monday, May 10th from 6:00pm-7:00pm, please reply to this email to confirm. 

Monday, May 10, 2021

5:00PM-6:00PM EST

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/2242615853

Meeting ID: 224 261 5853

Thank you for considering sharing your thoughts and opinions with us about how to maximize the use of the building adjacent to the PMA at 142 Free Street, purchased by PMA in 2019, so that it most effectively serves our visitors and our community. It will be very helpful as we plan for the future of the PMA. We hope you will join us and look forward to listening and learning from you. 

Alicia’s email address is acoll@portlandmuseum.org.

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Spirit of Reciprocity

May 6, 2021

Global Oneness Project

With a deadline of June 3, 2021 the Global Oneness Project is providing an opportunity for students ages 13 and up in the US and 16 and up globally to submit a photograph or illustration that reflects the spirit of reciprocity and kinship with the living world.

SPIRIT OF RECIPROCITY

You might be wondering, what is meant by the spirit of reciprocity?!

Reciprocity is an act or process of exchange where both parties mutually benefit. The origin of the word reciprocity in Latin, reciprocus, means moving backwards or forwards. The actions of giving and receiving are both included. 

For example, if you look up a diagram documenting the process of photosynthesis and respiration, you’ll see a circular motion. Plants are living and breathing systems.

According to Kimmerer, “Reciprocity is rooted in the understanding that we are not alone, that the Earth is populated by non-human persons, wise and inventive beings deserving of our respect.” As she writes in Braiding Sweetgrass, “We are surrounded by teachers and mentors who come dressed in foliage, fur, and feathers. There is comfort in their presence and guidance in their lessons.” 

The Serviceberry: An Economy of Abundance” by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Original illustration by Christelle Enault

GUIDELINES

  1. Contestants must be ages 13 and up in the U.S. and 16 and up globally. Check our Submission Guidelines and Rules and our Terms of Service for more details.
  2. All entries must be related to the contest theme: the spirit of reciprocity. Students will submit one photograph or original illustration which is a response to at least one of the following excerpts from Kimmerer’s writing. How might the excerpt you select help to inform your photography or illustration?
    • “I hope my grandson will always know the other beings as a source of counsel and inspiration, and listen more to butterflies than to bulldozers.”
    • “Birds, bugs, and berries are spoken of with the same respectful grammar as humans are.”
    • “Do we treat the earth as if ki is our relative—as if the earth were animated by being—with reciprocity and reverence, or as stuff that we may treat with or without respect, as we choose?” (As Kimmerer writes, “Ki is a parallel spelling of chi—the word for the inherent life energy that flows through all things.”)
    • “To replenish the possibility of mutual flourishing, for birds and berries and people, we need an economy that shares the gifts of the Earth, following the lead of our oldest teachers, the plants.”
    • “Living beings are referred to as subjects, never as objects, and personhood is extended to all who breathe and some who don’t. I greet the silent boulder people with the same respect as I do the talkative chickadees.”
  3. Photo entries and original illustrations must be accompanied by a short artist’s statement (a minimum of 100 words and a max of 600). Artist’s statements can also be in the form of a poem. The aim of this statement is to tell the story of what is captured in the photograph or illustration. Statements must respond to at least 2 of the following questions:
    • What informed your decision to take your photograph or illustration?
    • In what ways has the COVID-19 pandemic revealed new ways of seeing and being with the living world? Has the pandemic increased your compassion for the living world? If so, how?
    • What story does a plant (or other living element) in your life have to tell? How are you included in that story?
    • What are the names and origins of the plants that are captured in your photograph or illustration?
    • In what ways can we listen to the living world with our whole selves?
  4. Images should help to express students’ human relationship to the living world. Students can include themselves and others in their photographs. Be creative! If your photograph contains a person, you will need to fill out and return the Photo Subject Release Form.
  5. The photograph or illustration submitted must take into consideration the Global Oneness Project’s mission statement: Planting seeds of resilience, empathy, and a sacred relationship to our planet.
  6. Each photograph or illustration and response must be original and previously unpublished. Photographs may also include photo collages, but not be heavily edited (e.g. photoshopped).
  7. Eligible entries will be judged by a qualified panel consisting of professional filmmakers, photographers, and authorized personnel from the Global Oneness Project. Only one entry per contestant.
  8. Prizes. Winners will be awarded $200 USD each and photographs will be published on the Global Oneness Project website. 
  9. All entries must be accompanied by this signed Parental Permission Form

ENTER HERE

RELATED RESOURCES

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National Junior Duck Stamp Art

May 3, 2021

Biddeford 12 year old

Ariah Lowell, 12, of Biddeford, takes top honors in the National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest for her painting of a Harlequin Duck. Courtesy photo

A Harlequin Duck painted in oils by a Biddeford 12 year old, Aria Lowell, took third place in the National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest. More than 400 Maine students in grades K-12 submitted art work this year. The program is coordinated in state by the Maine Audubon and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Aria received Best in Show in Maine and went on to the national level representing Maine.

This “conservation through the arts” program uses the winning artwork as the basis for the $5 Junior Duck Stamp. Revenue supports environmental education activities for participants. encourages students to explore their natural world, invites them to investigate biology and wildlife management principles, and challenges them to express and share what they have learned with others. Nearly 9,000 students took part in the program nationwide this year. To learn more CLICK HERE.

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