Archive for the ‘Professional Development’ Category

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Superb All-State

May 23, 2017

Congrats on a great conference MMEA!

The registration table was well cared for with Sam Moore-Young, Ben Potvin, and UMaine music major student Micaela Ellis.

We know that it takes a village for success to happen and the many hands that planned (for months) to put together a celebratory Maine Music Educators Association (MMEA) conference are to be commended. Congratulations and a huge THANK YOU to those who took care of the many details!

All smiles in the vendor section!

This year the MMEA celebrates 100 years. In fact, MMEA is the oldest professional state music association in the country. Certainly something to be proud of!!! There are many dedicated people who have come and gone during the last 100 years who have proudly lead the organization. Those who come forward and do their parts as leaders stand on the shoulders of giants! At this time Waterville music educator Sue Barre serves as President. Thank you for the endless hours and your dedication!

Fun in the Motor Booty horn section!

For those of you who are history buffs I thank music educator Sam Moore-Young for providing the following…

Our parent organization, National Association for Music Education (NAfME) began as a small meeting of 104 music supervisors in Keokuk, Iowa in 1907 after the 1906 National Education Association (NEA) was canceled due to the San Francisco earthquake. After meeting again in 1909 in reaction to the NEA not addressing the concerns of music supervisors, the group formally organized in 1910 and called itself the Music Supervisors National Conference (MSNC).

In October 1915, at a meeting of music supervisors held in connection with the state Teachers Convention in the assembly room of Portland High School, it was decided that it was advisable to form a closer association of Maine school music teachers. A committee was formed to draw up a constitution. This was the beginning of the first state-level organization of public school music teachers in the United States.

For a number of years, the new organization, known as the Maine Music Supervisors Association (MMSA), met only once a year, at the time of the State Teachers Convention in October. At the October 1917 meeting in Bangor, with forty people in attendance, it was voted to collect dues of twenty-fie cents per year. 

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Maine Music Educators Conference

May 17, 2017

May 18, 19

Once again the Maine Music Educators Association is providing an amazing line up of sessions for your professional learning at the University of Maine, Orono for their annual state conference.

The MMEA Conference offers sessions relevant to teachers at all levels: from preK to high school, community to college. In addition to an incredible session schedule located at this LINK there are multiple opportunities to network with colleagues across the state and beyond.

If you have not pre-registered you can print off a copy of the registration form by CLICKING HERE. Bring the form and your payment with you to the conference.

All the details that you need including parking, a map, registration, and much more CLICK HERE.

This is a big year for the Maine Music Educators Association! MMEA is celebrating 100 years. Congratulations to the organization for providing opportunities for Maine educators and students. A great big thanks to the leadership for their continued and tireless work supporting music education in Maine.

 

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Summer Theatre Courses UMaine

May 11, 2017

Learning opportunities

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MLTI Student Conference

May 9, 2017

Time is running out

Only 200 students seats left and registration closes Friday, May 12th!! If you have not secured space for your school team, please register online as soon as possible. Registration closes Friday at 5:00pm or when we reach 1000 student registrations.
Things to consider:
  • Spaces are filling up – if you want to send a group of students, but don’t have names finalized, you may still register to reserve your spaces! Enter students as Student 1, Student 2, etc and provide names next week.
  • Unable to take time off from class to chaperone? Ask parents/guardians. How about other staff at school? There is no rule that says chaperones must be teachers! Get creative!
  • Can’t afford a bus? Remember to check the list of attending schools. Many districts are willing to bus share.
If you have already registered a team, you may now add up to 10 additional students and 2 adults – email Juanita Dickson at juanita.dickson@maine.gov.
Registration Information!!
 

Register online at http://maine.gov/doe/mlti/student/studentconference/registration/index.html


Conference Information


2017 MLTI Student Conference
Thursday May 25, 2017 
UMaine – Orono, Maine  
Agenda available at http://maine.gov/doe/mlti/student/studentconference/schedule/index.html

  • Schools may now register up to 50 Students and 10 adults in a 5:1 ratio.
    • For groups of students that don’t divide evenly by five, please round up in your adult count. For example, if you are bringing 6 students, you must have 2 adults. If you are bringing 36 students, you must have 7 adults. Remember, chaperones do not have to be school staff – we often have parents volunteer to chaperone!
  • There are 1000 student registration spots available so don’t delay!
  • Registration will close when 1000 registrations are received or by May 12, 2017.

Cost Information

$15 per attendee (student or adult) The cost includes morning refreshments and lunch, as well as a T-shirt for each student attending!  Two ways to get a discount:

  • Presenting teams are provided three complimentary registrations per presenting team – up to one adult and two students.
  • Students with artwork selected for the 2107-2018 screensaver will have registration costs waived.

Media Release Forms


The Department asks that attending students have a signed media release form. There are many photographs and videos being taken during the event and often media is present and on occasion may want to interview students. Student may still attend without a signed form!! We ensure that all name tags are coded so at a glance it can be known if the student is okay to photograph/interview or not.


A media release form is available on our website. If your school has media release forms on file, there is no need to have a second one signed. Please indicate on your registration form that forms are on file at the school.
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MLTI is pleased to welcome a few special guests!!
Joining us as the Student Keynote is Bri Adkins from Foxcroft Academy. Bri the entrepreneurial energy behind Pretty Smart Magazine, with passions that include journalism, coding, and fashion. In her talk Bri will share how her interests and efforts have taken her to New York City for one of Karlie Kloss’ “Kode with Klossy” coding camps and earned mention on the pages of Teen Vogue. Hers is a story of ambition, focus, and effort, and she will encourage all participants to identify their passions and make amazing things happen.
Also joining MLTI at the event is the Ballroom Thieves!!  (Hint: The band will be key players in this year’s Uber Session!)

Guitarist Martin Earley, cellist Calin Peters, and drummer Devin Mauch are the Ballroom Thieves and attendees at the MLTI Student Conference will get to know them right from the start of the day – they’ll be performing live in the Collins Center for the Arts’ Hutchins Concert Hall as participants select their seats and excitement is building around the big day!

This band loves music, and they enjoy working with kids who are in the early stages of their musical joiurney. In fact, they teamed up with the Maine Youth Rock Orchestra to play in Rockland, Maine at Hollerfest II at the Strand Theater, and the results can be seen and heard here.

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Calling All Teacher Leaders

April 26, 2017

Regional VPA Teacher Leader Search

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) – Phase VII

Join us for GREAT learning and networking opportunities! The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative invites YOU to be part of Phase VII. We are looking for teachers interested in leading and in taking a close look at effective teaching and learning in the arts.

Application at THIS LINK. Deadline: Friday, May 19, 2017.

Phase 1 Teacher Leaders, August 2011, Maine College of Art

If you are selected, you will be required to attend the summer institute, August 1, 2, and 3, 2017 at Thomas College. We will provide professional development and ask that you take what you’ve learned and share it with other educators in your region of Maine and beyond.

If interested, please submit a completed application by the Friday, May 19 deadline. Access the application by CLICKING HERE. Details are below.

Selected teacher leader responsibilities for the 2017-18 school year include:

  • Attend the 3-day Professional Development Summer Institute, August 1-3, 2017, Thomas College, Waterville. To prepare: Pre-reading assignments and responses are expected in google site. Each Teacher Leader determines individual plan for the school year/what the outcome of their learning will be and how to share with others. This enables teacher leaders to really take on the leadership role! (List of options available by contacting Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov)
  • Communicate using a google site
  • Possible Critical Friends Day as a follow-up to the summer institute
  • Continuation of Another Teacher’s Stories on the Maine Arts Ed blog
  • Attend retreat to reflect on the work of phase VII with MALI participants – Saturday, March 10, 2018

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Background Information

Overall Description 

Phase 2 Teacher Leaders, August 2012, Maine College of Art

Mission: Committed to the development of Teacher Leaders to ensure deep understanding and meaningful implementation of high quality teaching, learning and assessment in the Arts for all students.

Since 2011 the initiative has been building capacity by training arts educators on the “what” and “how” of arts assessment so they can provide the leadership in Maine through professional development opportunities. The details of the initiative are at https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Programs/MAAI.

MALI’s OVERALL OBJECTIVES

  • Create and implement a statewide plan for teacher leadership in arts education. This includes professional development opportunities, locally, regionally and statewide, which will expand on the knowledge and skills of teachers to better prepare them to teach in a student-centered and proficiency-based learning environment.
  • Develop and implement standards-based high quality teaching and learning statewide for Visual and Performing Arts
  • Continue to build on expanding the team of arts educators and teaching artists representing all regions of Maine
  • Provide workshops and other professional development opportunities for educators

Phase 3, Critical Friends Day, 2013, Point Lookout, Northport

HISTORY – Phase I, II, III, IV, V, VI Summer 2011 to present

  • Eighty-one teacher leaders and four teaching artists leaders attended summer institutes on assessment, leadership, technology, creativity, proficiency-based standards-based and student-centered teaching and learning
  • Teacher leaders presented workshops at three statewide arts education conferences, USM, Portland, UMaine, Orono, and Point Lookout Conference Center with over 600 educators attending
  • Teacher leaders facilitated almost 100 regional workshops and 15 mega-regional sites across Maine
  • Another Arts Teacher’s Story series (78) on the Maine Arts Ed blog
  • Arts assessment graduate courses offered by New England Institute for
    Teacher Education
  • Nine arts education assessment webinars for Maine educators facilitated by Rob Westerberg and Catherine Ring – archived at https://mainearts.maine.gov/pages/education/maai-webinararchives#
  • Video stories of seven teacher leaders that demonstrate a standards-based arts education classroom located on Maine ARTSEducation YouTube channel or at http://newenglandinstitute.org/.
  • Teacher Leader Resource Team development of items for resource bank
  • Maine Arts Assessment Resources website that contains a plethora of information

Phase 4, Summer Institute, 2014, USM Portland

Phase VII components

  • August 1, 2, 3, 2017: Professional Development Summer Institute for PK-12 teacher leaders (new and returning), teaching artists, and teaching artists leaders at Thomas College.
  • Each Teacher Leader determines individual plan to share their learning at the local, regional or statewide level.
  • Continuation of Another Teacher’s Story on the Maine Arts Ed blog
  • Winter Retreat: Saturday, March 10, 2018

For More Information

Phase 5, Critical Friends Day, 2015, USM Portland

Questions?

If you have questions or would like more information please contact Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Another Arts Teacher’s Story: Jean Phillips

April 11, 2017

MALI Teacher Leaders Series

This is the seventh blog post of the Phase 6 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader stories. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about the work each Maine visual or performing arts teacher or artist is doing.  CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 81 Teacher Leaders plus 4 Teaching Artist Leaders.  CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE  for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. There have been 77 posted to date. Thank you Jean for sharing your story!

Jean Phillips has been a teacher at Wiscasset Middle High School for fifteen years. Originally hired to teach English, but, in 2008, when the drama coach and director left, she picked up the three drama classes. In 2010, when the person hired to direct the One Act Festival play suddenly quit, the opportunity to direct came along. The following year, Jean was “hired” to teach three drama classes: Acting Workshop, Children’s Theatre, and Tech Theatre Design and to direct the two yearly productions. She has been doing both “jobs” ever since. Presently, Jean also teaches the 8th Grade drama component of their Allied Arts program. Her  yearly responsibilities include two public performances – one in the fall and the One Acts Festival piece – creating, building, or procuring all the sets, costumes, and props, as well as the maintenance, storage, and upkeep of the lights and the stage. She usually teaches nine to twelve 8th graders per quarter and 10-15 students per year in the Acting Workshop class per year; 8-12 students per year in the Children’s Theatre class; and 20 – 30 students per year in the Tech Theatre Design class. Jean’s Acting Workshop class involves teaching the terminology specific to theatre, stage positions and body positions – creating characters through analysis and fulfilling the performance standard by producing a public performance piece. Children’s Theatre begins with each student reading a children’s book, creating a story board for the book, a group decision of which play be the best to produce, writing a script, practicing together, and putting on a public performance – sometimes with children in the audience. Tech Theatre Design involves the technical aspects of theatre – specifically the design and construction off a set, sometimes the design of costumes, if time permits lighting and makeup.

What do you like best about being a theater educator?

My most favorite part of being a theatre teacher is watching students become hooked on working on the stage – either behind the scenes or as actors. I love that many disenfranchised students have found a home in theatre and even if they don’t pursue it any further than high school, they will have gained skills that will carry them throughout life.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

The three essential things to a successful performing arts education is full support by administration, parents, and state; less interference by outside agencies; and fewer budgetary constraints.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

I am just beginning to utilize more formative assessment in the classroom. The public performance has always been the summative assessment, but I have found it important to the success of the summative assessment if more formative assessments are given.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership initiative?

Before becoming involved in MALI, I taught my three classes and directed my plays. Now, I have never been as involved with professional development for the arts as I have this year. I have made more contacts and found advocates. I have also been able to engage more students in advocacy for the arts, too.

What are you most proud of in your career?

I am most proud of two things: first, that I have been directly responsible for having students opt to become theatre arts majors in college; and two, that students who have not normally found a home in high school have found a safe haven on stage.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

For me there are two things that get in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as an educator: people who have no idea what happens on stage telling me how to do my job – the more constraints put on me by bureaucrats makes connecting with students harder because I’m spending more time with pointless paperwork than working directly with the students; and my own inhibitions. I am not a risk-taker and feel safer with the tried and true.

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

My whole life has been about hard work and determination. I have major anxiety and live my life in stress. In spite of this, I have earned two BA’s and an MA – all because I do not believe in quitting. I broke my leg my third year of getting my MA and learned to drive with my left foot so I could continue going to class because I knew that if I took the rest of the semester off, I would never go back. I set my sights on a goal and just push forward since I’ve never been very lucky or relied on circumstances to get what I want.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Wow – I’d tell them there’s a fine line between keeping discipline and being a hard nose about following the rules. I’d tell them that there will be times when you won’t sleep because you’re worried, or you’re scared, or you’re frustrated, or you’re stuck – and all of those sleepless nights will be worth it when just one student comes back to thank you or remembers you fondly later in life. I’d say that no matter how much your budget gets cut just keep on keeping on. Arts education is important and students need this creative edge as well as a haven – be these things and more.

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

If I had $500,000 I would build a separate arts facility for Wiscasset Middle High School – one with adequate space and light for the visual arts, a clean, soundproof room for band and chorus, and a dedicated space for the construction of sets, the construction and storage of costumes, and a place for all performances. If this isn’t feasible due to budget constraints, I would overhaul the stage lighting, build a space for the construction and storage of sets, maybe get more tools, and have someone come in and design a much cleaner, more organized space for the lights.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

Who doesn’t have regrets? I guess my biggest regret would be that I didn’t reach more students, especially since many of them shied away from my program because they were anxious about performing or because they were afraid of me because of what they had heard from other people. I hope to have worked on the latter before I’m 94.

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CIE Summer Institute

April 6, 2017

Thomas College professional development

Bring a team from your school to the Center for Innovation in Education Summer Institute at Thomas College, June 27-29. Great opportunity to collaborate on planning for your students!

Docudrama, song writing, invasive European green crabs, and an all hands-on deck problem solving challenge—what a combination! Only at the Center for Innovation in Education’s Summer Institute: Weaving a Tapestry of Learning this June will you get to explore the connections among these activities and create powerful metaphors for learning related to the role the Arts play in STEAM curriculum and instruction.

For more information CLICK HERE.

  • PreK-12 participants are encouraged to come in teams to work on projects specific to your school.
  • Grants are available to defray registration costs for up to 5 people on a team.
  • Format: Nationally known speakers, concurrent sessions by outstanding Maine educators, and team time with a coach to work on individual projects.
  • Interactive, reflective, & practical
  • CEUs available
  • Graduate credit available (must pay the Thomas graduate course fee)

Of special interest to Arts educators:

  • Brooke Haycock from the Education Trust uses a docudrama format to stimulate participants’ thinking: “…transform research into performance, exposing the stories behind the data and driving straight to the heart of debate around equity in schools.” https://edtrust.org/team/brooke-haycock/
  • Members of the EXPLO organization will lead us through a hands-on, interactive challenge that integrates the arts into the problem solving necessary to meet the challenge. https://www.explo.org/our-history/

Coaches include:

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