Archive for the ‘Professional Development’ Category

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Happy Summer!

June 21, 2017

First day

Today marks the “official” first day of summer. I realize that most schools are out for the summer break and that some schools are still in session. Whatever is happening in your life right now summer plans can be underway, if they aren’t already. What will you do this summer? How will you spend your time?  Thought about any books to read? Any professional development to attend? Any videos to view or courses to enroll in? Rewrite lessons, units, or course syllabi?

There are a variety of professional activities to engage your mind in many different ways. Once you take a deep breath and catch up on a little sleep, consider setting some goals for yourself. What will you do and where might it take you?

Consider the following online resources that you can take along almost wherever you go and get your summer thinking underway:

More information and suggestions for summer professional development that you can take the lead on will be posted on the blog in the near future.

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Figurative Sculpture Workshop

June 8, 2017

Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts

Figurative Sculpture Workshop
Dates:  July 20-21
Location: Lincoln Academy, 81 Academy Hill Road, Newcastle, ME  Map
Workshop Fee*: $195 for out-of-state teachers ; $95 for Maine teachers
Optional Housing**: $40 per night
This workshop is for middle and high school art educators.
During this two-day workshop, artist and art educator Claudia Olds Goldie will present a number of figurative ceramic sculpture projects that can be adapted for all grade levels, class sizes, and classroom situations.  Claudia will draw from her experiences as both a long-time teacher and as a professional artist. Through demonstrations and hands-on practice, participants will learn how to create a hollow standing figure, a proportionate, expressive head, and a life-size hand.

Because the course will be held off-site at Lincoln Academy, the local high school (rather than at Watershed), please be prepared to transport your work home as greenware at the end of the workshop. Participants may choose to stay at Lincoln Academy during the workshop or commute.

 Contact hours will be provided by Watershed for this workshop.
*Includes clay and lunch on Thursday and Friday.
** Housing is at Lincoln Academy in double occupancy rooms with twin beds.  Participants must bring their own bedding.  Fee includes breakfast.

About Claudia Olds Goldie

Claudia is a 2017 Mass Cultural Council finalist. She has received a Kiln God Residency from Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, a residency fellowship from the Vermont Studio Center, and a nomination for a Boston Foundation Brother Thomas fellowship. She has shown nationally in shows such as the NCECA Biennial in Houston, SOFA Chicago, numerous State of Clay National Juried exhibitions, Ohio Craft Museum’s “Figure It” Invitational, and “Contemporary Figurative Sculpture” at Santa Fe Clay Gallery. She shows her work at Boston Sculptors Gallery and Frederick Holmes Gallery of Contemporary and Modern Art in Seattle.

Claudia received her BFA from Boston University College of Visual Arts. She celebrates her 40th year teaching sculpture at Dexter Southfield School in Brookline, Massachusetts, and is an instructor at Harvard’s University’s Ceramic Program.

Her work has been published in 500 Figures in Clay, 500 Figures in Clay Vol. 2 by Nan Smith, Sculpting Clay, and Low Fire: Other Ways to Work in Clay, both by Leon Nigrosh, and Ceramics Monthly, Clay Times, and American Craft magazines.

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Live Coding Using Sonic Pi

June 5, 2017

Using simple computer code in real time

The Midcoast Music Academy in Rockland is offering a class called Live Coding Using Sonic Pi taught by Tom Luther. Not to long ago I wrote a blog post on the academy at THIS LINK and a post that Tom Luther contributed to at THIS LINK.

Live Coding is a way to create sound and music using simple computer code in real time. The program we use is called “Sonic Pi”, and it is designed for simplicity and flexibility. It’s language is easy enough to pick up quickly for a beginner, and it’s design is deep enough for a more advanced user.

This class is for anyone, regardless of experience level with music or coding. Participants will learn the basics of the language, and how to use it to create simple to more complex pieces of music from a small set of tools.

The class covers

  • Simple sound/music making (simple musical structure/form) Basic definitions (synth terms, code syntax)
  • Altering sounds
  • Using on board samples & using your own samples
  • Using effects and synthesizers
  • Adding random elements
  • Live looping versus preplanning

This will be a hands on class, and we are going to make a lot of noise!

For more information and to register contact Midcoast Music Academy 207-701-7410 info@midcoastmusicacademy.com.

Take a look at this youtube video for a brief overview to get an idea of Sonic Pi.

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Monhegan Awards

May 29, 2017

2017 Monhegan Artists’ Residency Awards Announced

Meg Hahn, On a String, 2016, oil on panel, 12”x12”

MONHEGAN—The Monhegan Artists’ Residency Corporation has announced their choice of three Maine artists for the 2017 summer residency program on Monhegan Island:  Meg Hahn and Mia Snow, who are both painters and recent graduates of the Maine College of Art, and Cory Bucknam, a Gifted and Talented Art Teacher at Brunswick Junior High School who creates abstract ceramic pieces.  Hahn and Snow will spend five weeks in June and September, respectively, and Bucknam was awarded the two-week residency in July, recently established for artist-teachers who serve the K-12 grade levels in Maine.

Cory Bucknam, untitled, 2017, white earthenware, 12″x18″

The three were selected by a jury that included Chris Stiegler, curator, art historian, and chair of the MFA in Studio Art at the Maine College of Art, Portland; Hilary Irons, artist, and co-founder/curator of Able Baker Contemporary, Portland; and Kelly Finlay, a Monhegan Artists’ Residency board member and public programs manager at the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland.

Established in 1989, the Monhegan Artists’ Residency program supports the creative growth of dedicated Maine artists by providing them time and space in which to work free of interruption and constraint in the inspiring environment of Monhegan Island.  Long a haven for innovative artistic practice, the island offers a dramatic setting and a compelling community of visual artists, fishermen, and gardeners who provide an unusual and distinct perspective on the modern world. For more information about the residency, see monheganartistsresidency.org.

Maia Snow, Aiahha, 2017, oil on canvas

If you have questions please contact Susan Danly at susandanly@gmail.com or by calling her at 233.0896.

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Music Educators Opportunity

May 27, 2017

New England Institute

Proficiency-based teaching and learning is here to stay. Learn how you can effectively implement it in your MUSIC classroom, with Jake Sturtevant!  Improve your classroom results, make your Principal happy, and take care of your recertification credits this summer! For K-12 Music Educators.

Jake has been a teacher leader with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative since it started in 2011.

For More Information, or to Register, click here.

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Teaching Artist Opportunity

May 26, 2017

Calling Teaching Artists – You’re Invited!

Summer Professional Development

Tuesday, August 1, 8:00 to 4:00

Thomas College, Waterville

The Maine Arts Commission invites teaching artists to attend an all day professional development opportunity on Tuesday, August 1. This will take place on the first day of the MAC Maine Arts Leadership Initiative summer institute on the beautiful campus of Thomas College in Waterville.

Teaching Artist Tim Christensen working with a Camden Rockport Middle School student during a residency

This year’s Teaching Artist professional development day is designed to focus on the role of the teaching artist and the relationship between the teaching artist and the K-12 arts educator.

The day includes workshops designed specifically for Teaching Artists focusing on a variety of topics: practices for Teaching Artists including standards, assessment, advocacy, marketing yourself, and more.

What will you get when you attend the Maine Arts Commission professional development day?

  • Information on applying your expertise as an artist to the structuring of your lessons and residencies.
  • Hands-on experience in relating the learning standards and assessments to your work.
  • Opportunities to network with PK-12 visual and performing arts teachers from Maine schools.
  • Participation in sessions that are planned to fit your needs as a teaching artist.
  • A light breakfast, a yummy lunch, and afternoon snacks

Teaching Artists interested in attending must register by CLICKING HERE.

Teaching Artist John Morris working with students in MSAD#33

To apply for the Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artist roster artists are required to attend the summer professional development opportunity. The Commission will be accepting applications in the fall of 2017. CLICK HERE for the MAC Teaching Artist roster.

Presented by Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) of the Maine Arts Commission. To learn more about the MALI please CLICK HERE. Facilitated by Teaching Artist John Morris and Music Educator Kate Smith.

If you have any questions please contact Argy Nestor, Director of Arts Education, Maine Arts Commission, argy.nestor@maine.gov or John Morris at JohnMorris08@gmail.com.

 

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Superb All-State

May 23, 2017

Congrats on a great conference MMEA!

The registration table was well cared for with Sam Moore-Young, Ben Potvin, and UMaine music major student Micaela Ellis.

We know that it takes a village for success to happen and the many hands that planned (for months) to put together a celebratory Maine Music Educators Association (MMEA) conference are to be commended. Congratulations and a huge THANK YOU to those who took care of the many details!

All smiles in the vendor section! Pamela Kinsey, Roger Whitney, and Glen Sargent.

This year the MMEA celebrates 100 years. In fact, MMEA is the oldest professional state music association in the country. Certainly something to be proud of!!! There are many dedicated people who have come and gone during the last 100 years who have proudly lead the organization. Those who come forward and do their parts as leaders stand on the shoulders of giants! At this time Waterville music educator Sue Barre serves as President. Thank you for the endless hours and your dedication!

Fun in the Motor Booty horn section!

For those of you who are history buffs I thank music educator Sam Moore-Young, Craig Skeffington and retired music educator Bob Mode for providing the following…

Our parent organization, National Association for Music Education (NAfME) began as a small meeting of 104 music supervisors in Keokuk, Iowa in 1907 after the 1906 National Education Association (NEA) was canceled due to the San Francisco earthquake. After meeting again in 1909 in reaction to the NEA not addressing the concerns of music supervisors, the group formally organized in 1910 and called itself the Music Supervisors National Conference (MSNC).

In October 1915, at a meeting of music supervisors held in connection with the state Teachers Convention in the assembly room of Portland High School, it was decided that it was advisable to form a closer association of Maine school music teachers. A committee was formed to draw up a constitution. This was the beginning of the first state-level organization of public school music teachers in the United States.

For a number of years, the new organization, known as the Maine Music Supervisors Association (MMSA), met only once a year, at the time of the State Teachers Convention in October. At the October 1917 meeting in Bangor, with forty people in attendance, it was voted to collect dues of twenty-fie cents per year. 

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