Archive for the ‘VPA’ Category

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Another Arts Teacher’s Story: Hilary Martin

March 21, 2017

MALI Teacher Leaders Series

This is the fourth blog post of the Phase 6 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader stories. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about the work each Maine visual or performing arts teacher or artist is doing.  CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 81 Teacher Leaders plus 4 Teaching Artist Leaders.  CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE  for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. There have been 74 posted to date. Thank you Hillary for sharing your story!

Hilary Martin is currently working as a grades K-8 ed. tech. at the Vassalboro Community School in AOS 92. Before this year, beginning in 2013, she worked as the K-12 theatre teacher at the Vinalhaven School, where she taught K-5 drama, high school public speaking, and middle and high school electives in acting, directing, playwriting, and technical theatre and design. While at Vinalhaven Hilary also directed after-school productions.

What do you like best about being an arts educator?

Having the opportunity to help students be creators, and giving students who might not be highly successful in other classes a place where they can shine.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

Community support, investment from administrators and colleagues, and a passionate teacher.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Assessment allows me to get a sense of what students have and haven’t mastered, so I know what curriculum areas to spend extra time on, and it allows me to give students useful, constructive feedback on their work.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative?

Being an arts educator can often feel very isolated–a lot of time you’re the only one in the building in your subject area, and being a theatre teacher even more so, as there aren’t that many of us in the state! Being involved with MALI has been a wonderful opportunity to network and share resources with other theatre teachers.

What are you most proud of in your career?

While at Vinalhaven, I began taking students to the Maine Drama Festival. Our first year attending we placed second at the regional competition, and the program has been successful enough to continue under the new Vinalhaven theatre teacher. I’m very proud of how I was able to expand the already very strong theatre program at Vinalhaven!

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

Time, or the lack of it! With all of the responsibilities teachers have there is very little time for professional development, collaborating with colleagues, or even individual curriculum planning–all things that are crucial to being an effective educator.

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to luck” or circumstances?

While on Vinalhaven, I had the opportunity to become a literacy interventionist, in addition to my work as the theatre teacher. This gave me a great opportunity to improve my skills as a teacher and get to know my students in a new way. While to some extent that opportunity was a result of being in the right place at the right time, it was also a result of my own hard work and commitment to continuing my education and training.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Know your limits, and don’t be afraid to say no to additional commitments. Arts educators tend to love what we do a great deal, and as a result it can be easy to overextend ourselves–I know I’ve found myself in positions where I took on more than I could reasonably handle! Remember to leave yourself space for rest and recovery.

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

I would create a program to expand the number of in or after school theatre programs for elementary students. For many students, their first opportunity to participate in theatre comes in middle or high school, but elementary students can benefit just as much from being involved in theatre.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

It’s hard to say, but I hope that by the time I reach 94 I’ll have the perspective to look back on all the moments of my life as valuable learning experiences!

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New England Institute for Teacher Education

March 20, 2017

Upcoming arts ed courses available

EDE 325: Technology for Educators – online course taught by Barb Vinal, April 10 – June 19, 2017

  • Are you ready to take your classroom into the 21st Century?
  • Are you in awe of your colleagues who are more facile with technology than you are?
  • Would you like to explore how Google Drive can help you organize your classroom?
  • Would you like to learn how to best use tech tools and social media?

This course is a great way to get your recertification credits in ONE class for 4.5 CEUs – all online!
SIGN UP TODAY and take your understanding of technology to the next level!

Barb Vinal (Packeles) taught music in Maine for many years before moving to North Carolina where she continues teaching and learning as the Instructional Technology Facilitator and Magnet School Coordinator for the Wake County Public School System in Raleigh, NC. She has been an educator for 30 years and holds a Masters in Technology Education from Lesley University, a Bachelors in Music Education from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and holds a certificate in online instruction through the Carolina Online Teacher program (COLT) through LearnNC, a program of the UNC School of Education. Barb serves on the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Leadership Team. She was a member of the Maine Department of Education Learning Results Review Committee in 2007, developing the Maine state standards in Visual and Performing Arts. 

EDAR 528: Brains on Fire, An Arts Integration course taught by Catherine Ring, Hilton Garden Inn Bangor, Maine – April 14, 15 and June 16, 17, 2017, (Fridays 4-8pm, Saturdays 8-4pm)

Earn 4.5 CEUs and learn how to engage students in learning through the arts!  This course is approved for Gifted Talented endorsement, as well. SIGN UP TODAY!

This course will take an in-depth look at the significant role the arts can play in learning. Participants will see examples of student learning through visual art, dance, music and drama; learn about the critical evidence of improved academic achievement by students who are regularly exposed to the arts; and participate in practical, hands-on arts integration lessons which can be used immediately in the classroom. Helpful resources, including books, videos, websites, wikis and lesson plans will be shared. Collaborative work between arts teachers and classroom teachers are encouraged.

Catherine Ring is Executive Director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education and teaches graduate level courses to educators across the state of Maine. She serves on the Leadership Team with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative since 2010. Catherine has presented at the Maine Principals’ Association Conference as well as nationally at the National Art Education Conventions. Catherine has taught visual arts for 20 years, is a former K-8 Principal and is has her Assistant Superintendent certification. Catherine completed her Education Leadership studies at the University of Vermont and received her Master of Arts from Vermont College of Norwich University. For her thesis, entitled “Education and the Arts, Toward Creative Intelligences,” she researched the role of the arts in learning and has worked closely with classroom teachers, helping them to integrate the arts into their regular curricula. She assists school districts throughout Maine with differentiated instruction, arts integration, and gifted and talented programs. Catherine is the 2014 Maine Art Education Association Advocate of the Year. Catherine teachers visual arts one-day per week at Isle au Haut School.

 

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Podcast on the Arts

March 19, 2017

Making the Case for the Arts Economy

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-3-03-58-pmThe arts in America is big business — a $704 billion-a-year business, according to Department of Commerce figures. Nearly a fifth of that economic activity, $134 million, is generated by the nation’s 100,000 arts and culture nonprofits, as are millions of jobs, says Robert Lynch, president of Americans for the Arts. You can listen to the podcast by CLICKING HERE.

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Heart Warming

March 15, 2017

National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards

This is a video tape of the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards being presented in conjunction with Michelle Obama in November 2016. When you listen to the descriptions of the programs perhaps you will feel as I did – no matter what, the future is in good hands. It’s a bit longer than most videos I post but it is worth your time. Be sure and listen carefully when you get to about 32 minutes.

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Celebrate: March and the Arts!

March 1, 2017

Happy Arts Education Month!

YAHOO! We have a great opportunity this month to celebrate the amazing work and accomplishments of students in the visual and performing arts. CONGRATULATIONS to all the educators who provide an excellent arts education and access to it for learners of all ages. I know that you are proud of your students and I encourage you to take advantage of this month designated to celebrate arts education. Whether you do it in a small or large way, please let me know about the work you are doing so I can let others know. Your good ideas should be shared so others can learn from you! And, a great big THANK YOU for your commitment to visual and performing arts education!

MY SUGGESTION: Take advantage of Arts Education Month to engage others in the conversation of why a quality arts education is essential for all students.

Below are the professional organizations who provide many suggestions and links to ideas to help you and your students plan for a celebration.

NAEA

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-40-12-pmThe National Art Education Association has been celebrating Youth Art Month since the 1960’s. Check out what the National Art Education has to offer on the topic by using the key words “youth art month” in the search bar on the site. The purpose of YAM is to emphasize the value to children from participating in visual art education.

CFAE

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-56-21-pmThe Council for Art Education at provides tons of resources to help you plan. They have ideas on their site that teachers and students are engaged in across the country. The ideas range from school based to community, both large and small. You can sign up for their free newsletter and receive information on a regular basis.

NAfME

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-54-48-pmThe National Association for Music Education has been recognizing Music in Our Schools Month since 1985. The idea started in 1973.  You can learn what NAfME has to offer on MIOSM by CLICKING HERE. The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that schools is where all children should have access to music.

EDTA

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-12-23-pmscreen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-04-06-pmThe Educational Theatre Association and the International Thespian Society have partnered with American Alliance for Theatre & Education (AATE) to sponsor Theatre in Our Schools. For ideas on how to create a celebration CLICK HERE. Their resources are directed towards Thespians, schools, and educators. The purpose is to raise public awareness of the impact of theatre education and draw attention to the need for more access to quality programs for all students.

NDEO

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-27-36-pmThe National Dance Education Organization celebrates the artistic and academic achievements of exceptional students through the National Honor Society for Dance Arts (NAHSDA) by teaming up with the US Department of Education during March. Learn more about their advocacy work by CLICKING HERE.

As you’re contemplating your March celebration checking out the blog post I included last year at this time can provide you with more resources. CLICK HERE for that blog post from March 1, 2016.

AFTA

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-3-03-58-pmAmericans for the Arts envisions a country where everyone has access to—and takes part in—high quality and lifelong learning experiences in the arts, both in school and in the community. Their arts education council represents a cross section of the country so all voices are represented. The Americans for the Arts website has a plethora of resources on arts education. Check them out by CLICKING HERE.

MALI

MALI_V3_Color_100ppiThe Maine Arts Leadership Initiative provides plenty of resources at THIS LINK. Like all academic areas, students of the arts are successful because of teachers who are highly skilled, knowledgeable of developments in their fields, and motivated. MALI Teacher Leaders and Teaching Artists Leaders take on multiple leadership roles. If you’re interested in being part of a supportive collaborative group of visual and performing arts educators consider applying to be a Teacher Leader this Spring. If interested, or if you wish to learn more at this time please contact me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

 

ARTS ADVOCACY DAY

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-9-06-48-pmWe know that arts-rich schools benefit everyone. It is our responsibility to help others who may not understand this statement. Arts Education month provides that opportunity and the Maine Alliance for Arts Education has plans for Arts Advocacy Day in Augusta at the State House on Wednesday, March 8. To learn more visit the MAAE site by CLICKING HERE.

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Arts Learning Grants

February 27, 2017

Maine Arts Commission grants

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at 10.18.08 PMThe Maine Arts Commission awards grants to artists, arts organizations, and arts educators through 12 different programs. The 2017 applications for six of these, with a deadline of March 23, are now open. The Arts Learning grant is especially for schools and educators working with students providing arts education.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 23, 2017, 5 PM.

The maximum award is $5,000. Last year the average grant award was $2,300.

ABOUT THE ARTS LEARNING GRANT

Funds are to be used to enhance PK-12 arts education through teaching artist programs, connections with community arts education, curriculum planning, professional learning for arts educators, teaching artists and teachers of all content.

The proposal should include the use of best educational standards-based practices reflecting 21-century teaching and learning.

PK-12 schools, community organizations, and cultural institutions acting as or in partnership with teaching artists are eligible to apply for the Arts Learning grant.

There is a required 50% in-kind or cash match for this grant. (For example, an applicant asking for $5,000 must provide $2,500 of matching support.)

The funding cycle for this program is July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Your school or organization is eligible to apply only if it meets all of the following criteria:

  • Is a nonprofit organization, legally established in the state of Maine.
  • Has a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status from the Internal Revenue Service, is a public school, or is a unit of municipal, county or tribal government.
  • Is in compliance with final reports required for any previous Maine Arts Commission awards received.

REVIEW CRITERIA

Arts Learning Grant applications are reviewed on a competitive basis using the following criteria:

  • Demonstration of high-quality arts education teaching and learning opportunities. (25%)
  • Clear description of the project and its impact. (20%)
  • Evidence of significant collaborative planning among teachers and other partners and capacity to carry it out. (20%)
  • Description of evaluation methodology with clear objectives and outcomes. (15%)
  • Alignment with State of Maine Learning Results for Visual and Performing Arts. (10%)
  • Assurance that the project will include certified, trained teaching artists and will provide professional development opportunities where appropriate. (10%)

APPLICATION NARRATIVE

  1. In two to four sentences, please describe your idea. (638 characters max.)
  2. Clearly state the objectives for the idea, and plans for evaluating your success. (1,275 characters max.)
  3. Describe your partnership, collaborative planning and the learners that you serve, including underserved students. (1,275 characters max.)
  4. How does your proposal align with the State of Maine Learning Results for Visual and Performing Arts and other standards if relevant? (1,275 characters max.)
  5. Who are the professional teachers and teaching artists involved in this project? Summarize their professional experience.(1,275 characters max.)

APPLICATION PACKAGE REQUIREMENTS

A completed application in the Grants Management System (GMS) for the Arts Learning Grant contains:

ONLINE

  • Completed answers to all narrative prompts
  • Completed project budget
  • Most recently completed Form 990 (for organizations only)
  • Resumes, bios, or curriculum vitae for all key personnel. Include resumes for all teaching artists
  • One to three letters of support from individuals or representatives of organizations or schools who can speak to their anticipated benefit from the project
  • Lesson Plan/Unit showing learning outcomes and assessment tools

To read all of the details please go to https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Grants/artslearning.

If you have any questions please contact Argy Nestor, Director of Arts Education, Maine Arts Commission at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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In Today’s News

February 17, 2017

NCCAS Releases Update on State Arts Standards Adoption

February 16, 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) has released a report entitled “The Status of Arts Standards Revisions in the United States since 2014.” The report is the result of an analysis of states who have revised their standards since the publication of the National Core Arts Standards in June 2014.

Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 11.09.54 AMThe National Core Arts Standards for dance, media arts, music, theatre, and visual arts, were created in a transparent inclusive process engaging over 130 arts educators as writers and 6,000 reviewers. These PreK-12 grade-by-grade standards were written to guide educators seeking to provide quality arts education for America’s students, define artistic literacy, and support 21st century skills and college and career readiness.

Commencing in January 2015, NCCAS member organization Americans for the Arts, in partnership with the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education, began conducting the research culminating in this report. With the assistance of other NCCAS member organizations, Americans for the Arts interviewed and collected information from more than 270 individuals and organizations from across the nation, including state department of education arts curriculum directors, state arts agencies, and several other public sector partners with expertise in state arts standards revisions.

Jane Best, executive director of the Arts Education Partnership said of the report, “It is affirming to see so many states reviewing, revisiting, and renewing arts education standards. This is a meaningful step to ensuring that all children have exposure to the arts as part of a well-rounded education.”

The report may be downloaded from the resources section of the National Coalition for Core Arts standards interactive home at http://www.nationalartsstandards.org/content/resources.

The National Coalition for Core Arts Standards is an alliance of national arts and arts education organizations dedicated to ensuring quality standards-based arts opportunities for all students. Members include the American Alliance for Theatre in Education; Americans for the Arts; Educational Theatre Association; National Art Education Association; National Association for Music Education; National Dance Education Association; NCCAS Media Arts Committee; and Young Audiences Arts for Learning.

Contact: Cory Wilkerson
Tel: 800-587-6814
Email: projectmanager@seadae.org

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