Archive for the ‘VPA’ Category

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Twitter Chat on Mindset

October 17, 2017

Join MALIs first Twitter Chat

Join your colleagues from across the state (and the nation) and participate in a Twitter Chat on Mindset. The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative’s Teacher Leader Melanie Crowe helped to create our first Twitter chat opportunity.

The chat is based on the book of the same name, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck. It is not necessary to read the book to participate but we highly recommend it. 

The Twitter chat is scheduled for Monday, October 30, 8:00 – 9:00 p.m. eastern time.

The conversation provides the opportunity to consider your own learning and how you approach it. And, will include the chance to consider your classroom environment and how you approach your teaching. The overarching discussion question: How does your mindset influence the way that you approach students?

The following questions will guide the online conversation:

  1. Consider mentors in your life who have supported you through a growth mindset approach. Reflect on your own growth and response with their guidance.
  2. In what areas can I continue to be a learner? What am I personally and professionally interested in? How can my professional learning opportunities be more relevant to my own needs as a learner?
  3. When reflecting on something that you have learned recently, what kind of impact has it had on you and by extension your students?
  4. What resources, materials and/or curriculum is available for use at your school that supports a growth mindset?
  5. In what ways can you share with students your own struggles and successes with your current and/or previous work?
  6. How can students connect the dots between what they are learning now and their own experiences? How are you helping them to see those connections?
  7. Do your students have an opportunity to help adults with genuine problem solving?

If you’ve never participated in a Twitter chat and wondering how to participate, the directions are below.

  1. If you don’t have a Twitter account, please start one at Twitter.
  2. TweetChat is a great tool to use when you participate in a tweet chat. Log in with your Twitter handle, enter the hashtag of the event (#MEArtsEd), and TweetChat will pull up all the related messages so you can follow the conversation.
  3. If you are not using the tool TweetChat, once logged into your twitter account you can search the hashtag #MEArtsEd and see the live conversation stream taking place or after the event to view the conversation.
  4. Make sure you add the tweet chat hashtag (#MEArtsEd) to your tweets (if you’re not using TweetChat) so participants can find your messages in the conversation.
  5. When you begin the chat – take a moment to introduce yourself and where you are from – remember to use #MEArtsEd
  6. The tweet chat host (@crowe_artteach) will mark questions with Q (for question) and the number of the question. When you submit your answer, mark it with A (for answer) and the number of the original question so other participants can link your response with the correct question.
  7. Sit back, relax, join in on the conversation to learn, reflect, and respond to your colleagues from the state of Maine and beyond!

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Arts Assessment Article

October 15, 2017

Ed Week

The co-founders of a Washington-based consulting practice, Artful Education, Emily Gasoi and Sonya Robbins Hoffmann, authored this article How to Assess Arts Education – And Why You ShouldEducation Week, October 9, 2017.

As many of the Maine Arts Education blog readers are aware in 2010 when the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (now called the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative) was established, the spotlight was shed on assessment in visual and performing arts classrooms across the state. Since the first statewide conference focusing on arts assessment in 2011 Maine has transformed – assessment in the arts is more commonly part of everyday practice.

How timely that Gasoi and Hoffman make points in their article that I mentioned in a recently (blog post Our Responsibility as Educators), addressing and assessing the 21st century skills.

Taken from their article….

Teaching and assessing skills gained through the arts, as well as in creative processes across other disciplines, will become the norm. Here are some examples of the kinds of demands we are already responding to in the 21st-century that compel us to advocate more and better arts education:

1. To sift through the constant flow of information, students need to develop skills to evaluate the quality and accuracy of content and recognize false information.

2. A wide variety of technology and media platforms necessitates the ability to think critically and work with a variety of tools.

3. Employers are demanding creative problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to self-direct and collaborate.

4. In a gig economy characterized by temporary projects and frequent shifts in occupation, students will be faced with both increased control of career path and no clear road map. Being able to imagine one’s path and to pivot as external realities change is critical.

5. In our global society, curiosity, flexibility, and particularly the ability to see multiple perspectives are necessary building blocks for interacting with other cultures.

And, speaking of Assessment – The Art of Education included a recent post with 5 Simple Pre-Assessments for Short Class Periods written by Kelly Phillips. She uses a technique called “Now I Know/I Already Knew That” and claims that it is a perfect pre-assessment for showing growth for Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). In her post she explains the details.

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Arts Education Network

October 11, 2017

Opportunity to connect

Heather Martin from Arts are Elementary in Brunswick

On Friday, October 6, representing organizations, institutions, and schools almost 40 people gathered at the Farnsworth Art Museum for the Maine Arts Commission Arts Education Network.

PURPOSE

The purpose was to meet and learn from each other by sharing information and resources, exchanging ideas about education programs, and collaborative thinking.

Hannah Cordes, Portland Stage Education Manager listens while Julianne Shea, Education Administrator introduces herself

It was a great opportunity to NETWORK!

The first part of the agenda included the opportunity to hear about the statewide arts education census that was conducted during the 2015-16 school year. Julie Richard, the Maine Arts Commission executive director shared highlights.

Julie Richard, Executive Director at the Maine Arts Commission reviews what we learned through the state wide census in Arts Education conducted during the 2015-16 school year

Andrea Curtis shared information about the Farnsworth education programs. Teaching artist Alexis Iammarino provided the background information on the murals she has created with students that are located throughout Rockland.

All participants introduced themselves and answered What drives you? Why do you do what you do?

Chrissy Fowler from Belfast Flying Shoes and Joshua McCarey listen while Jessie Davis the Executive Director of the Strand introduces herself

The second part of the day, the participants were in four groups to discuss the following audience questions and vision questions.

AUDIENCE 

  •      With whom do you currently collaborate?
  •      With whom might you like to collaborate?
  •      Who are your programs currently reaching?
  •      Which demographic would you like to engage more?

 VISION

  •      If there were no constraints on your resources (i.e. time,   staffing, funding), what would you do?

ridget Matros from Waterfall Arts listens while the Arts Education Exchange participants share information about their work in arts education

Small groups shared with the entire group. Participants were invited to visit the Midcoast Music Academy, the Strand Theater, CMCA, the Farnsworth, or the murals they had learned about earlier in the day.

Notes were taken in each group which will be collated and shared with the participants and the 20 others who were not able to join us. If you are part of an art organization, institute, or school and have an arts education arm and are interested in connecting please email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

Ian Bannon from Figures of Speech and Celebration Barn documenting participants comments

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What the Research Says

October 9, 2017

Howard Gardner and Ellen Winner on Arts Education

After 50 years of arts-learning research with Project Zero, Howard Gardner and Ellen Winner have a pile of data that they’ve learned from and the learning continues. In the Education Week article The Arts Have Much More to Teach Us written by Gardner and Winner provide a summary of the work. In the 90s Lois Hetland worked with Winner to look at the data on students with high and low exposure to the arts and their math and reading achievement. Many of you are familiar with and use Lois Hetland’s Habits of Mind framework published in Studio Thinking: The Real Benefits of Visual Arts Education.

Education Week has put together a collection of articles and research on arts education on topics that you’ve been hearing and reading about and in many cases considering including in the development of curriculum.  They claim that arts education is “a discipline in transition”. When I take the long view of my career in arts education I believe that we’ve always been in transition. At some level ‘shifting’ is the nature of our discipline. Depending on the school, district, and the attitude towards the arts (based on the experiences of those in decision making positions), that is what determines the view of and commitment to arts education. Having said that the following are worth the read and can help influence your thinking when it comes to teaching, creating curriculum, advocating, and a list of other arts education related topics and ideas. And, the bottom line is the arts have a rightful place in our schools and it is our responsibility as educators to see to it that they are ESSENTIAL for all learners. A PreK-grade 12 education without excellent arts education instruction is not acceptable!

The Arts Need to Be a Central Part of Schooling

Oct. 2, 2017

The research in favor of arts learning is stacking up, writes Johns Hopkins University’s Mariale Hardiman.

There’s Something Missing From STEM Learning

Oct. 2, 2017

Including arts in science and math instruction promotes student creativity and job preparation, writes STEAM specialist Susan Riley.

Arts Integration Is a Sucker’s Game

Oct. 2, 2017

Turning “STEM” into “STEAM” won’t stop arts from getting squeezed out of the curriculum, cautions researcher Jay P. Greene.

How to Assess Arts Education—And Why You Should

Oct. 2, 2017

Arts instruction and understanding the creative process can help prepare students for 21st-century challenges, write Emily Gasoi and Sonya Robbins Hoffmann.

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Maine Teacher of the Year – Kaitlin Young

October 4, 2017

Announced today at a surprise assembly

Kaitlin Young when she was recognized as the 2017 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year

CONGRATULATIONS to Kaitlin Young, 2018 Maine Teacher of the Year. Kaitlin teaches music to elementary and middle school students and is a proud member of the SeDoMoCha teaching staff. She loves teaching, her students, and her community. When she joined the staff at SeDoMoCha Elementary and Middle Schools there were 4 students in the chorus and today the chorus has 175 members. WOWZER!

Today is a special day for Kaitlin! In a surprise assembly each year the new Maine Teacher of the Year is named and today is the day!

Kaitlin is a teacher leader with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative and her project this year is Showcasing the Learning Process Through “Informance”.

Kaitlin was named the 2017 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year in the Spring and spent the summer on the next step – being considered for the state honor. She spent hours putting together her teaching history, answering questions, and presenting in front of peers.

Along with Kaitlin two other state finalists were selected. Jennifer England, an English teacher at Noble High School in North Berwick, developed a program for at-risk students at the school and oversees senior projects. And, Kasie Giallombardo is a social studies teacher at Nokomis High School in Newport. Principal Mary Nadeau said her work there represents the “art and science” of teaching, with effective strategies for student learning.

In September a team visited the three finalists schools for a site visit. They visited Kaitlin’s classroom, interviewed her colleagues, administrators, community members, and students. Maine’s selection process is long and tedious, unlike most other states.

The last music teacher who was selected as Maine Teacher of the Year was Charlie Seymour. Charlie was teaching at Camden Hills Regional High School and the year was 1986.

I am sure you will all join me in CONGRATULATING Kaitlin – she will do a wonderful job representing educators from across the state as she travels in and out of state during the next year. Soooooo excited for Kaitlin Young, especially since she speaks our language – ARTS education! YAHOOOO!

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Arts Education Exchange

September 20, 2017

Friday, October 6

Does your organization provide some type of visual or performing arts education programming?

If so, YOU’RE INVITED to join the Arts Education Exchange on Friday, October 6, 1:00 – 4:30 at the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland.

The Maine Arts Commission has planned an opportunity for community arts centers/organizations, visual and/or performing arts focused schools, museums, and galleries who offer education programs to meet for an afternoon of idea exchange.

PURPOSE

The purpose will be to meet and learn from each other by sharing information and resources, exchanging ideas about education programs, and collaborative thinking. This will be a great networking opportunity.

This first Arts Education Exchange will take place at the Farnsworth Art Museum on Friday, October 6, 2017, 1:00 – 4:30 and hopefully, in the future the gathering will take place at other locations in the state.

If you are interested in attending please complete the ARTS EDUCATION EXCHANGE REGISTRATION. If you can not attend on October 6 but are interested in future exchanges please complete the survey at the registration link and indicate your interest. If you have questions please contact Argy Nestor, Maine Arts Commission Director of Arts Education at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

DATE

Friday, October 6, 2017

This date is also when the last First Friday of the year will take place in Rockland, sponsored by the Arts in Rockland (AIR).

TIME

1:00 – 4:30

The Maine Arts Commission is excited to offer this opportunity and grateful to the Farnsworth Art Museum for hosting this event.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • The Farnsworth Art Museum is located at 16 Museum Street, Rockland. Driving directions THIS LINK.
  • The Farnsworth education staff invites you to visit the museum at no cost – come early or stay late (open 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., The Wyeth Center closes at 5:00 p.m.).
  • Consider staying into the evening for Rockland’s last First Friday, organized by the Arts in Rockland (AIR). At 8 p.m.
  • The Farnsworth is showing a First Friday Film at the Strand Theatre, Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art. More details located HERE.

If you have questions please contact Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Who Are They? Wintergreen Arts Center – Part 6

September 17, 2017

Under the Willow Tree, a Creative Preschool

This blog post is one of a 6-part series about the Wintergreen Arts Center in Presque Isle.  Wintergreen provides creative experiences that empower the young and young-at-heart to imagine, invent, and innovate. With quality arts education programming for children of all ages, family-friendly signature events, and adult programs, Wintergreen works with several community partners to deliver inspiring opportunities to help individuals bloom and Aroostook County thrive. Dottie Hutchins is Wintergreen’s executive director. You can learn more at www.wintergreenarts.org

SNOW Sensory Table

On September 6, 2016, Wintergreen launched its creative preschool, Under the Willow Tree. The preschool was born from a very real need in the community—quality programming for preschool aged children. Our roster filled, even overflowed, and we currently have waiting lists for multiple years out. The need for creative choices in early childhood development is great and parent feedback keeps our program moving in the right direction.

Under the Willow Tree is an educational program for children ages three to five years old. It is open to an ideal class size of 14 students and meets Monday through Thursday mornings. The preschool implements a child-centered approach using small-group and hands-on activities to provide students with a diverse learning environment. The program teachers give instruction and guidance to children in ways that foster imagination, creativity, and critical thinking. The creative preschool program uses a variety of teaching tools and resources that engage all the senses and give students the opportunity to learn at their own pace.

Officer Kris and his Junior Wintergreen Officers

Presque Isle Police Officer Kris Beck was the first to visit Under the Willow Tree.

One item on the curriculum engages the students with individual community helpers. From police officers to firefighters, librarians and architects, the children fully embraced the idea of learning more about people who help our community.

“Inviting people like Officer Beck into the classroom is important for early career education and exploration,” said Mrs. Jillian Harris, Wintergreen preschool teacher. “It also introduces children to people who help to make our communities safe and successful.”

Officer Beck talked with the children about his job to protect and serve the community. He also allowed them to sit inside his patrol vehicle and ask questions about his uniform and the equipment he carries to perform his duties throughout the day.

In preparation for Officer Beck’s visit, the children worked all week making their own uniforms out of paper grocery sacks. They painted their uniforms blue and also made badges, hats, and stop signs to carry. The entire class was excited to meet Officer Beck and show off their uniforms.

2017_04_26_Mia Brewer visits PreschoolCommunity helpers who visit with Wintergreen’s preschool students are not always adults. Last April, 10-year-old autism self-advocate Mia Brewer visited Under the Willow Tree where she read a story, played with, and talked to the children.

Mia has autism and she also has a sister with autism whose needs and challenges are very different than her own.

“Mia doesn’t want to be or wish to be different, she likes being Mia,” said Lisa Brewer, Mia’s mother and Wintergreen preschool teacher. “We think our students agree that Mia is perfect just the way she is.”

In June 2017, Wintergreen celebrated their very first graduating class of creative preschoolers from Under the Willow Tree.  These children will forever hold a special place in our hearts.

On September 5, 2017, Co-Teachers Lisa Brewer and Katie Greenlaw welcomed a brand new class and look forward to another year of creative learning and exploration. The relationships and memories these children are making will last a lifetime.

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