Archive for the ‘YAHOO’ Category

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Art Teacher Extraordinaire Retiring

June 28, 2022

Congratulations, Ms. Snider, and thank you!

“LOVE WHAT YOU DO AND NEVER STOP LEARNING ABOUT WAYS YOU CAN ENGAGE STUDENTS!”

While reading Janie Snider’s reflections below you will understand who she is and the impact she has had, not only on her elementary and middle school students, but the adults in her life also. Janie is a gem whom I’m certain will be missed in her daily teaching role. I’m confident that she will continue to make a difference in this world through her interactions with others as she enjoys her retirement. Thank you Janie for your service to the field of education! I know the blog readers join me in wishing you the very best in your retirement.

Last week of school, Hancock Grammar School

IN JANIE’S WORDS…

I have been teaching for 30 years. My first ten years teaching were in SAD#37 including Columbia Falls, Millbridge, Cherryfield, Harrington, and Addison. I started as a long-term art substitute, then as a kindergarten teacher and the following year as the art teacher. In 2002 I started teaching at Hancock Grammar School, where I spent the last 20 years. As a result of consolidation, I also taught art at Lamoine Consolidated for four years from 2011-2015. I received a Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education, K-8 from University of Maine, Machias and K-12 Visual Arts Certification.

My favorite part of teaching is building the most wonderful relationships with students that revolve around art making! Painting is my favorite discipline. Guiding students through color exploration and expression is so rewarding.

Cherryfield School – notice all the art styles included?

It has been quite the journey from when I was a young itinerant art teacher. I remember being so overwhelmed in my early years; five schools, 600 students and all the different challenges. In year three I was considering giving it up. I was feeling isolated and unsure of my impact on students. Then one day as I was introducing landscape to third graders I learned that I was! As I explained the horizon line, a little boy who normally didn’t participate suddenly started waving his hand, so I called on him. He was so excited to have made this connection, he said, “I saw it this weekend when I was on the lobster boat with my Dad, there it was and I knew it had something to do with art!!!” From that moment on, I never questioned my ability to connect students with the wonders of art in their world. It was my inspirational moment. Nature is my inspiration for my own work and it easily found it’s way into my lessons!

I have seen many changes in education and art education over the years. I truly believe that being included in the “Maine Learning Results” gave validity to arts education. However, it was challenging to keep up with the interpretation of standards that serve as guidance in developing strong arts programming. I was fortunate to have been an active part of this process, a member of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI, now MAEPL), a local leader, and advocate for arts education. All of which helped me tremendously with meeting students needs! As a result of my work, I was recognized as the 2014 Maine Middle School Art Teacher by the Maine Art Education Association. This was a very important time in affirming my career. Representing Maine and attending the National Art Education Association conference in New Orleans was a definite highlight!

Another huge change is how technology has developed and changed the art curriculum, this boggles my mind. I started my career without using any technology and in 2020 developed an online art curriculum for remote learning.

Three things that are really key to a successful art program are:

  • KNOW your students, develop a relationship with them!! Listen to them!!
  • SHOW your passion for your profession!! Be creative in your approach!!
  • GO WITH THE FLOW, be flexible, be current with best practices and meet students where they are!
Janie in her classroom at Hancock Grammar School

I am most proud of my ability to guide students and help them understand and appreciate art in education and the world. I recently received a message from a former student who was in Washington DC at the National Gallery and was thinking back to the many lessons she learned in my classes. She thanked me for that. I have many young adults that have reconnected with me and shared their fond memories in art! 

Looking into my crystals ball….My advice to teachers is “LOVE WHAT YOU DO AND NEVER STOP LEARNING ABOUT WAYS YOU CAN ENGAGE STUDENTS!” 

K-8 mural, D.W. Merritt Elementary School, Addison. Kindergarten students started at the bottom and the mural grew as each grade contributed.

Stay curious, involved and be a life long learner. Take classes and reach out to others in your area of expertise, they are a gift!

I have come to realize that I was supposed to be an art teacher. So I guess the innate ability to teach was there, I just needed to become aware of it. I knew early on I had some artistic talent and wanted to be an artist. However, life happened and that dream had to be on hold. So I learned a lot of teaching skills over the years that helped me in my work! I’m still learning more about my work through my reflection. I am hopeful that during retirement I will rediscover that innate “art-self” that will bring my life-long dream into being.

Hancock Grammar School

I plan to make time for me and my art! I plan to take art classes, garden, read, travel with my honey and spend time with family and friends. I have grandkids that I am excited to have more time with!❤️ I know me and I am always busy, so my goal is to slow down just a bit and smell the roses!!

If I was given $500,000….definitely, buy a camper to continue my trips to the national parks. Contribute to my grandkids education fund and invest in my community arts programming! 

I hope to be 94 and looking back!! My mom made it to 93 and we had a conversation about regrets before she passed. No regrets here, I have lived a good life, learned many lessons to carry me into the present! I have listened to my intuition and followed my heart, which is full of love!!❤️

Janie painting, home studio
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Music Teacher Extraordinaire Retiring

June 21, 2022

Congratulations, Mrs. Murphy and thank you!

I love helping students find their voices.

Kim Murphy has been teaching music for the last 34 years and is retiring this month. She’s one of those teachers who I thought would never retire since she has a ton of energy and is totally engaged in every aspect of teaching. She has high expectations for herself and her students. Kim always has a smile on her face and her laughter is contagious! I’m certain that she will be missed! (You can learn something about Kim’s humor by the most of the photos below and the embedded links, be sure and click on the center capitalized titles to see the videos).

Kim started teaching grades 6-12 Choral and General Music at Oak Hill High School, Sabattus, Litchfield and Wales. Shortly afterward the position changed and she taught Band and Chorus, grades 9-12 at Oak Hill High School. She took a sabbatical in 1996-97 and then moved to Lincolnville. For the last 25 years she has taught at the high school, Camden-Rockport High School for 3 years and when the new high school opened, Camden Hills Regional High School (CHRHS), she has taught there. Earlier in her music career she worked as a music therapist in Peapack, NJ and Bethlehem, PA.

Kim was a double major and has a Bachelor of Science degree in Music Education and Music Therapy. She is a Nationally Board Certified teacher.

What has been your favorite part of teaching?                                                                                                                       

  • I love helping students find their voices. Find their self-confidence through singing. I love it when someone has a solo – and other people never realized what a beautiful voice that person has.  And then there is just the self-confidence in getting up and singing before a large crowd – whether in a small group or a large group. There are life lessons – the teamwork is necessary. 
  • I love music festivals – where students from different schools come together to create works of beauty. It’s SO different from sports – where someone is always the winner and someone is always the loser. With music festivals – the competition has already happened (through auditions) and the coming together to create a concert in 2 – 3 days is a wonderful way to build connections.
  • And then of course – I love musicals!

Tell the readers about a moment in your teaching career that has been unforgettable? 

  • Well – there are many.  But a recent one is…. During the 2020-21 school year, I had the FIRST tent up!  And my tent was the FIRST to blow away! UNDER THE TENT!
And there she blows!

What changes have you experienced during your teaching career that have been positive and/or negative?

  • I think it’s great that kids can take so many AP courses – and get college credit. Yet this (adding of AP classes to schedules) has really hurt music programs in that the schedule and time for Band and Chorus is getting squeezed out. And also – is it healthy for a student to have so many AP classes?
  • In a positive manner, I think students are more assertive; they self-advocate for what they need in education; education is now –  less “top down” instruction and more collaboration.

YESTERDAY!

What do you think are three keys to ANY successful music ed program? 

  • Know your students, be genuine in your care for them
  • Flexibility and creativity – learn to work with schedule changes, or things that happen that throw your carefully written plans out the window
  • Plan, plan, plan 
  • And (a 4th!) have a sense of humor!

What are you most proud of in your career?

When I was hired at CRHS I said that my personal 10 yr goal was to have the strongest choral program in the State of Maine. We are lucky – we have fantastic community support. I think – with the numbers of students that have been accepted to District III, All State, All Eastern and National festivals over the years – I think that it has been one of the strongest choral programs in the State. Unfortunately – right now – due to Covid and other challenges – the Chorus program is not as strong (in numbers) and that breaks my heart. You have to have the numbers.

Who influenced your work as a teacher or perhaps inspired you?

Charlie Seymour and Steve Moro

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Teaching is the hardest and best profession. There are days when you will want to cash in your chips early – don’t! Hold on. Your students learn more from your daily attitude and mindset than you realize. As a teacher – you teach a subject area – but it’s the character that you bring into the classroom that has the lasting educational benefit.

IT’S TIME TO SING!

How much of what you do is learned skills and how much is innate?

Wow – that’s an interesting question. I come from a family of teachers – so I think that was how we grew up. So – teaching comes naturally. I was going to be either an English or Math teacher. Those subjects come easily to me (well….not Math anymore – ha ha). But Music didn’t come easily. I had to work at it. I had to make it look easy. But – because I had to work at my music skills so hard, that made me a better teacher – because I could understand why kids were struggling, and I could break it down into smaller chunks for them to understand.

I’VE GOT MY OWN TENT!

What does retirement look like for you?

Exciting and Terrifying.  I have an Air BNB business at my house, which I LOVE to do – and hope to be able to grow that – especially in the shoulder seasons (when I would have been at school). I’m connecting with community theater and music groups – because that is my passion. I do a lot of work with my church – and hope to be able to volunteer more with places like AIO food pantry (food and energy assistance for citizens of Knox county) or other social programs. And finally – I will fly to CA (whenever I damn well please) to see my son!

If you were given $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

I would create a theater program for kids – especially kids who struggle in life.  

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back, do you have any regrets?

I hope not!  You have to live in the moment and enjoy each beautiful step.

The concert photos in this blog post were taken by Marti Stone Photography.

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2022 Maine County Teachers of the Year

June 12, 2022

Congratulations!

The 2022 County Teachers of the Year were announced recently in Augusta at the State House. I love that there are so many teachers each year nominated who represent all that is ‘right’ with education. Each of us in the profession, no matter what our role is, should feel the pride!

I’m especially excited this year that there are two performing arts teachers; representing Hancock County is Rebecca Edmondson who teaches music at Conners-Emerson School, Bar Harbor and representing Somerset County is Debra Susi who teaches theatre at Central Institute, Pittsfield.

Hundreds of teachers across Maine are nominated by a member of their school community. The application process is rigorous, not a lightly designed ordeal, with a teacher selected from each county by a panel of educators and other individuals who are members of each county.

Maine County Teachers of the Year serve as ambassadors for teachers, students, and quality education state-wide throughout the year. The Maine County Teachers of the Year are available to make presentations to local and regional organizations. Throughout the summer, they will continue to participate in an intensive selection process. In the fall one of these sixteen teachers will be named the 2023 Maine State Teacher of the Year.

I’m sure the blog readers join me in congratulating all of the county teachers of the year, especially Rebecca and Debra!

The Maine Department of Education’s Teacher of the Year Program is administered through a collaborative partnership with Educate Maine. To learn more about the Teacher of the Year Program visit: https://www.mainetoy.org/.

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MAEA Conference

May 20, 2022

Professional Development at it’s Finest

RSU #40 Art teachers Brooke Holland and Anthony Lufkin have been busy planning the annual Maine Art Education Association Fall Conference at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and Monson Arts. This is the first conference being held at Haystack since September 2019, hence the theme. The conference is scheduled for September 16-18, at both Haystack and Monson locations. Registration opens on June 1 and you can prepare by reviewing the workshops that are being offered and the conference details. The cost is $295.00 (for MAEA members) and includes workshop, room, and delicious food. Some workshops have an additional materials fee. Registration opens June 1st so get ready! Studio descriptions are on the MAEA website now and are looking for volunteers to be studio assistants. If you are interested in being an assistant please respond to this google form. Assistants will be assigned on a first come first serve basis and will receive priority registration.  

Workshop Sessions at Haystack

  • Carved Alabaster – Anne Alexander
  • Relief Printing: Playing with Layers – Holly Berry
  • Mixed Metals – Maggi Blue
  • Ceramics, Form & Surface – Carolyn Brown
  • Large-Scaler Prints – Alexis Iammarino
  • Digital Fabrication – James Rutter
  • Tapestry Weaving – Bobbie Tilkens-Fisher
  • Pewter Casting – Simon ‘Siem’ van der Ven

Workshop Sessions at Monson​

  • Ceramics, Wheel-Throwing – Jemma Gascoine ​ 
  • ​Wood Engraving – Lisa Pixley

The descriptions, material lists, and facilitator biography’s for all the workshops are on the MAEA website.

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Spring Choral Concert

May 12, 2022

Camden Hills Regional High School

The Camden Hills Regional HS Chorale, Chamber Singers and Treble Choir will present their Spring Choral Concert on Tuesday, May 17th at 7:00 PM in the Strom auditorium. The ensembles, directed by Kimberly Murphy and accompanied by Matthew Mainster will perform a variety of selections, featuring many soloists and guest artists.

Kim Murphy

Of special note will be BSO percussionist Nancy Rowe accompanying the Treble Choir on xylophone in their performance of Mark Patterson’s “Edges of the Night” – a song that highlights the plight of refugees. Ms. Rowe will also play the djembe to accompany two selections by the Chorale and Chamber Singers. A guest string quartet: Sarah Glenn (violin), Heidi Karod (violin), Linda Vaillancourt (viola) and April Reed-Cox (cello) will accompany the Chamber Singers’ performance of “Deep Peace” written by Elaine Hagenberg and Ola Gjeilo’s “The Ground.” Both selections incorporate the theme of peace, with Ola Gjeilo’s composition ending with the lyrics “Dona Nobis Pacem” (grant us peace).

Nancy Rowe

Additional themes concurrent in many of the selections are that of youth, and hope through music. Young singers in grades 3 – 8 will join the high school Chorale in a stirring rendition of “Rise Up” – a song made popular by Andra Day.  The performance will feature many soloists including Sara Ackley, Alyssa Lewis, Lenigha White, Noelle Delano and young singers Rowan McWilliams and Nathan Gomez. The string quartet will return to accompany the Treble Choir in a selection which highlights the beauty and hope of music in “Alway Something Sings.” With text by Ralph Waldo Emerson and music by Dan Forrest, this selection also highlights guest singer, Lydia Day. The theme of hope for our youth continues with the Kyle Pederson composition of “Remember the Children.” This song will feature four soloists: Audrey Leavitt, Aly Shook, Lucas Marriner-Ward and Daniel McGregor.

Seniors Audrey Leavitt and Aly Shook will return to the stage as they lead the student a cappella ensemble: Fortissima in three selections. This extra-curricular student-led ensemble has been rejuvenated under their direction and is flourishing in dedication and musicality. Of special note will be a Fortissima performance of Tom Petty’s “Wildflowers,” arranged by Junior, Grace Yanz.

Throughout the evening many soloists will be featured, including Joshua Kohlstrom, Iselin Bratz, Nora Finck, Abigail Kohlstrom, Trey Freeman, Grace Yanz, Jocelyn Serrie, Charlotte Thackeray, Charlotte Nelson, Sophie Ryan, George Bickham, Maren Kinney, Alyssa Bland, Isabella Kinney and flautist Cabot Adams.

During this joyful concert student achievements in the MMEA District III and All State music festivals will be recognized, along with a tribute to our outstanding senior musicians. The concert is free to the public. As of this writing, masks, for both performers and audience members, are optional. For more information, contact director Kimberly Murphy at kim.murphy@fivetowns.net  See you at the show!

I’m certain this is going to be a spectacular concert since Kim is retiring at the end of this school year.

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World Collage Day

April 26, 2022

Plan to participate – May 14

World Collage Day is an international celebration of the fine art of collage being recognized this year on on Saturday, May 14th, 2022! Celebrate with enthusiasts around the globe. If you google ‘world collage day’ you can see what some others are doing to recognize the day. And right here in Maine, the Bangor Public Library has put a call out for collages that will be included in a display at the library. The details are below with hopes of having your students participate or, if the library is not a convenient location for your students, create something similar and get some energy going around World Collage Day! This is a great way to celebrate spring and to help turn the corner from the pandemic. Using the theme “Hopeful” because we know that there are many reasons to focus on what gives us hope.

Bangor Public Library Plans – your invited or use this idea to adapt for your community!

Join in the fun and make a collage to be on display at the Bangor Public Library!

You are invited to submit a collage if you are preK-grade 12 students. 

Collages must be no larger than 9”x12” and must be made of paper (no 3-D objects). You can use magazines, colored paper, newspaper, paper bags, tissue paper, wrapping paper, etc. and mount your collage on thin cardboard (cereal box thickness is sturdy enough to use for the backing of the collage). 

Created by Kal Elmore

What is a collage? 

Usually a collage is an art work made up of photos, clippings, or found items that are attached to a sturdy surface. An example is a picture of a tree made up of pictures of things that are green. You can search on the internet for many interesting examples of collage, if you would like to get ideas. 

The theme is ‘Hopeful

There are many reasons why this is a good time to focus on the things that give us hope. Brainstorm some ideas with a friend or family member and think about these ideas as you make your collage. 

Collages are mostly made up of scraps of paper so you can also think of this as a recycle/reuse project. (Do not use special pictures or papers without permission).

All you will need is some paper scraps, some glue, scissors (if you need to cut things), and your imagination! 

If you don’t have scrap materials at home you can go to the Bangor Public Library Children’s room and pick up a paper bag with paper scraps inside. You still need your own glue and backing material and scissors. These bags will be available at the library from May 2 – May 12, during library hours. 

Submit collages

Your finished collage needs to be submitted to the Children’s Room in the Bangor library on May 12-14, during library hours. (There will be a box for submissions.) 

Before submitting your collage you might want to take a picture of it or a picture of you and your collage. The library is not responsible for lost or damaged work, and sometimes things happen. If you want your collage, back you need to pick it up at the library on May 31 during library hours. 

If you want, you can post the picture of you and your collage on Instagram with the hashtag #meworldcollageday2022.

On the back of your collage please put your name, the title of your work, and a parent or guardian signature that shows you have their permission to submit the work. 

If you have any questions, please contact one of the librarians or Candis Joyce, Reference Department, Adult Program Coordinator, Bangor Public Library, 145 Harlow Street, Bangor, ME 04401, (207) 947-8336 ext. 127, (207) 922-6054 direct.

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Glassblowing in Belfast

December 1, 2021

Blowing glass is magic – ask anyone that’s done it!

Waterfall Arts in Belfast realized that they had a unique opportunity offered to them during the pandemic. But they faced many challenges just trying to get the idea off the ground. With a positive attitude and a new partnership their journey is already making a huge impact. This is the story of how that came about and a reminder of the importance of commitment, collaboration, and believing in an idea! Without these in place the dream would not reach fruition. And, it’s only at the beginning! I recognize and celebrate Waterfall Arts and their new partnership and what they’re providing for learners of all ages, especially local high school students.

PLEASE NOTE: At the end of this post I invite you to leave a comment and/or to use the questions for a local conversation.

BACKGROUND

Veteran glass blower David Jacobson realized his well established glass blowing business, Jacobson Glass Studio in Montville, was at a crossroads when the pandemic hit. In September 2020 David approached Waterfall Arts and spoke to Executive Director Kim Fleming about donating his glass studio equipment to Waterfall. Realizing what an opportunity this was Kim enthusiastically consulted with the Waterfall board. They agreed and collaborated with David and his glass blowing colleague Carmi Katsir to transform the Waterfall Arts basement into a glass studio.

David and Carmi demonstrating

THE STORY

When I listened to their story I was amazed how quickly things happened. David first communicated with Kim in the middle of September 2020 and during the first week in October the equipment was moved into the building. In the spirit of true artists they climbed over the logs in their pathway to problem solve, research, ask questions and learn, and find ways to attack the challenges. Combined with hours and hours of work, physical and mental, and financial support from funders and the greater community they opened the studio with a variety of purposes in mind.

Before they could open the studio there were many details to figure out besides just putting equipment in place. Investing money in this project was an enormous commitment. Kim secured funding from individuals and foundations including $10,000 to be used for disadvantaged students. The budget to run the program for two semesters is $25,000. One of the bigger hurdles was how to fuel the furnace that holds 100 pounds of clear, liquid glass and is kept at about 2,100 degrees. Plus the two forges that are used to heat up the glass as a piece is being formed and is kept at 2,300 degrees. Waterfall’s philosophy includes a commitment to be as green and as carbon-neutral as possible. So using natural gas or propane was not feasible. They researched to learn how they could build the system using discarded vegetable oil that is donated by a local donut shop. There are no models in Maine so it meant communicating with people outside of the state. They also learned that along with being the only community based glass studio in Maine they are only one of a handful of programs in the entire country that offer glass classes through the public school for students.

Miles opening the glass

WATERFALL ARTS STUDIOS

Waterfall Arts ceramics, printmaking, and photography studios are well established at the non-profit organization. Adding a glass studio was an easy decision but with filled with unknowns. Kim was able to acquire funding to purchase what they needed and build on the equipment and tools that David was providing to make a studio large enough for several people. David really wants to share his love for glass blowing with as many people as possible. So there are classes available to anyone from almost any age, no matter what their financial situation. David’s passion coupled with Waterfall’s goal of reaching others, who have not had this type of opportunity in the past, is a perfect marriage. It wasn’t long after the studio was set up that they began offering classes to individuals and groups. During the summer many people took advantage of the studio.

MAINE ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION FALL CONFERENCE

I had the privilege in September to participate in the Maine Art Education Association (MAEA) conference. Hats off to this year’s conference planners Brooke Holland and Anthony Lufkin who shifted from the traditional conference at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, due to the pandemic, and planned sessions in 12 studios across the state. I was in the glass studio at Waterfall Arts and it was a spectacular and fun experience. I was so impressed with the teaching of David and Carmi. I had only one previous glass blowing experience and this was quite different and extensive compared to that one. Our abilities varied greatly and yet the participants easily collaborated and supported each other making four pieces during the 2-day workshop.

Collaborating to open the top of the glass to form the shape

WATERFALL ARTS’ STORY, PURPOSE AND MISSION

To create community in harmony with nature through the transformative power of the arts. When the founding group of Waterfall Arts formed the idea in 2000 their shared goals for the future: to create aesthetic experiences that enhance and inspire people’s creative abilities and transform their lives. An equally important goal was to reach people who had not had such opportunities before.

Along with the studios used for classes and by individuals Waterfall has 16 private studios which are fully occupied at this time. During the pandemic it was difficult for some of the artists to pay rent. Waterfall was able to support these artists by waiving 2 months of rent. An amazing gesture to support individuals who needed it most.

In addition, Waterfall Arts has a variety of ongoing programs and events that are available year round. I suggest you spend some time on their WEBSITE.

Gathering glass

BELFAST AREA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS

In January 2021 the principal, Jeff Lovejoy, contacted Kim to learn what might be available for Belfast Area High School students to take for a semester long elective class. The high school building is a stone’s throw, across the road from Waterfall, so the outreach from school is a no-brainer. Mr. Lovejoy visited Waterfall for a walk through and discuss possibilities. He got excited about the glass lab. Kim put together a budget proposal to run a semester long class, twice a year. Kim scurried to secure funding in time to promote the class for the fall semester.

Jonah rolling the glass on the marver

PROCESS

There are not a lot of tools needed for the process of glass blowing. Steel rods are kept warm and dipped into the molten glass which sticks to the metal when ‘gathered’. The ‘gather’ is rolled on a thick steel table called a ‘marver’. Color can be added by rolling the clear glass in pieces of colored glass on the marver and put into the forge to keep it hot enough to manipulate. The entire time the rod is being rotated. The next step includes sitting at a wooden bench where the liquid can be shaped sometimes with a wooden paddle, a wooden cup with a handle, shears and/or tweezers. Several times in between forming the piece it is put back into the forge to maintain the heat. When completed it is taken off the rod with a bit of water to break the seal and a tap on the rod. The entire process is magical to do and to watch.  

CLASS BENEFICIARIES

I had the chance to visit the high school class, watch David and Carmi teach, and have conversations with some of the six students enrolled for the weekly semester class. In a word the entire experience for me was IMPRESSIVE. I’m sure some of my response is based on my 2-day class in September. Part of it is based on the ease with which the seniors handled the glass and navigated the tools and space. And, a lot of it comes from the teaching and collaborative spirit of the classroom/studio culture. We know that a teacher sets the tone and David and Carmi are TOP NOTCH! The students were serious about their work while having fun. I could see their confidence growing as they went through the process. Mr. Lovejoy said: “I am thrilled that Waterfall Arts, Carmi and David have been so accommodating to make this work for Belfast Area High School. I am excited to bring students from the Belfast Community Outreach Program in Education (BCOPE, the school districts community based alternative educational program) and underclassmen into the spring semester starting in February”.

Paddling the base to flatten it

STUDENTS COMMENTS

Ronin: “I was surprised on day 1 how we jumped right into the process even without any previous experience.”

Anna: “There is so much collaboration, that is a surprise. Each class has a different goal but we’re learning techniques that I didn’t realize I would use again and again. Like the ‘starter bulb’ we learned our first week while making pumpkins. I use it every class.”

Miles: “Everybody should do glassblowing – it’s awesome. It’s less scary than I thought it would be.” Miles is only applying at colleges that offer glassblowing.

The workspace with tools

DAVID AND CARMI

I’m impressed with the level of teaching. Many successful artists are not good at teaching. David and Carmi are successful at both. Watching them in action with the high schoolers is magic. They’ve been pleased and/or surprised about the following:

  • every week the students are enthusiastic about learning
  • student team work is amazing – they’re very generous and helpful to each other
  • very dedicated
  • we communicate with them like we would with adults
  • thought they would be more ‘product’ oriented, instead they are ‘process’ focused
  • 2 hours is not enough, extended class time to 3 hours for those who can stay longer and they all do
  • students are fearless

David and Carmi will make some changes for the next semester based on what they’re learning this first semester with and from the six seniors. Like any good teacher this information will help them build and expand on the program for the future. Between the dedicated staff and the establishment of this new program I’m certain we’re going to hear about this fantastic Waterfall program for many years. Kim is working to make Waterfall Arts everybody’s place, a destination. Not just through programs but also taking care of the maintenance on the building. The capital campaign has raised funding to replace the roof, re-surface the parking lot, and plans to replace 72 of the buildings windows. The glass studio expands Waterfall’s creative involvement. Kim said: “People want to be part of something successful. Our future is bright.”

Glass with a pinched handle

ARE YOU CURIOUS?

Perhaps you’re one of those people who would like to become part of something successful or you’re curious. If so, be sure and plan a trip to Waterfall Arts. If you’re interested in learning more about how you can get involved, take a class or perhaps give someone a unique gift of a 2-hour class for the holiday please go to Waterfall’s website at THIS LINK. If you’re interested in supporting the program please contact Kim Fleming at kim@waterfallarts.org.

FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONS for you to ponder, discuss with your own community, use as a starting place for a conversation to start doing work (or play) differently or by responding to the blog below in the section called ‘Leave a comment‘ or Like this post.

  • Why are the Belfast High School seniors so successful?
  • What makes this collaboration with Waterfall Arts, Belfast High School, and the glass studio so beneficial?
  • What are some ideas to make this into an interdisciplinary unit in the school curriculum with perhaps Art, Science, Writing?
  • Is there a potential partnership brewing in your community? What can you learn from the glass studio at Waterfall that might help in your partnership?
  • What are you already doing in your own work (or play) that mirror success?

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Sooooo Grateful!

November 25, 2021

Maine Arts Education Blog is Back!

I can’t think of a better day for the blog to return than Thanksgiving. Happy Thanksgiving to each of you! Even though the blog has been “away”, not a day as gone by when I haven’t thought about my faithful readers. I am thrilled to be blogging again!

APPRECIATING YOU

Now more than ever I am grateful for the work you do for, and with arts education. I know the blog readers represent a wide variety of people – all of you with a connection to arts education! You’re in small and large communities in Maine, cities and rural areas across the United States, and in countries around the world. Thanksgiving Day in the US gives us a chance to pause and give thanks. Now in 2021 it is more important than ever that we practice gratitude. Scheduling saxophone playing time, painting the same group of flowers, mindful breathing, or whatever activity you take for yourself all take practice time. During the last 6 months I’ve had the chance to pause and consider what’s important to me and engage in the art making process as no other time in my life. Along with practicing my art I’ve been practicing gratitude. Through this practice I am more joyful. I hope each of you can find the time on Thanksgiving to reflect on what you’re grateful for and what brings you joy! Please know I am soooooo very grateful for you!

My workspace

BLOG HISTORY

I’m sure some of you are wondering – how did we get here? The Maine Arts Education blog was established in the winter of 2009, while I was working at the Maine Department of Education as the Visual and Performing Arts Specialist. I worked there from 2006 until 2013 (after 30 years as an art teacher). It was David Patterson who suggested I establish the blog. I only wish he was still alive to see how his seed germinated. My initial purpose was to help build a state-wide arts education community which I found (while a teacher in the classroom) was desperately needed. Not an organization that represented the arts disciplines separately but collectively – dance, music, theatre, visual arts and later in my thinking poetry and writing. In 2013 I moved across the street and down the hill to the Maine Arts Commission (MAC), taking the blog with me, and served as the Director of Arts Education until June 2019. My View of the State House Dome continued, just from a different angle. In the fall of 2019 the MAC contracted with me to continue the blog. Three contracts later it was time for change soooooo with some communications with the Commission I am now the owner of the blog. During the years I was blogging while working for the state I posted 4,460 times. (That number still blows me away.) For the last almost 13 years the blog has been titled meartsed (Maine Arts Education) news from Argy with a view of the State House dome. For several years that was daily and I loved it! I’m so excited that the Maine Arts Education blog will continue, no longer, with my view of the State House Dome but with my view from my home across a beautiful field as you can see at the top of the blog. Many of the 4,460 posts were your stories – arts educators, teaching artists, students, schools, arts advocates, arts organizations, and others who are committed to excellent arts education for all. Blogging provided me with the opportunity to celebrate you and your daily work (and play) and I was proud to do so. Your stories are humbling! In addition to your stories I provided research, professional development information, articles, book reviews, events, announcements, interviews, pertinent arts education information, the places I traveled for educational opportunities and all types of other information. For the foreseeable future they will remain for your access and are archived below this one. If you want to search by topic I have tagged all of the posts. You can scroll down on the right side of the blog to the ‘search archives’ box and type in a name or topic and find what you’re looking for. For example, if you’re interested in reading about the teacher leaders (from the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative MAAI/Maine Arts Leadership Initiative MALI) you can type in teacher leaders and their stories will populate the front page. Or you could type in a specific teacher leader’s name and all the posts with that person included will populate the front page. (Try Rob Westerberg, Kate Smith, Catherine Ring, or Jeff Beaudry and you’ll see what I mean).

NEXT STEPS

Moving forward the blog will contain primarily stories – your stories. I will not be posting every day and when I do post the posts will be in depth. Next week the first story will be posted about the amazing and unique glass studio and the people involved in it happening in Belfast. I know that the pandemic has shifted teacher’s ideas about teaching. I know that you face challenges and joyful moments that are different than pre-pandemic. I want to hear your stories so I can blog about them so others can learn about your work (and play). And, so all of us, your colleagues, can celebrate you! Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, Argy Nestor, with your story or suggestions for the blog at meartsed@gmail.com.

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APPLY now!

June 21, 2021

Deadline tomorrow for MAEPL

Curious about the Maine Arts Commission (MAC) program, Maine Arts Education Partners in Leadership (MAEPL)? Wonder why you should consider applying? Listen to arts educator and veteran MAEPL Teacher Leader Charlie Johnson at THIS LINK explain his reasons and the benefits that he’s experienced during his ten years of participation!

DEADLINE TO APPLY IS TOMORROW, JUNE 22, 2021! DON’T DELAY!

DETAILS – THIS LINK

APPLICATION – THIS LINK

DOWNLOAD THE BROCHURE that contains all the information you need!

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MAEPL

June 16, 2021

You’re invited

Join us for a GREAT opportunity!

Now in its 10th year, The Maine Arts Education Partners in Leadership invites YOU, with other selected Maine visual and performing arts teachers and teaching artists, to be part of a year-long exploration in leading your school communities and the profession in effective teaching and learning in the arts.  If you are selected, you will be expected to attend the 2021 Summer Institute, taking place in person July 26-28 at Pilgrim Lodge on Cobbosseecontee Lake in West Gardiner.  Themes of this year’s Institute are: Reflection & Renewal ~ Sharing Successes ~ Partnerships ~ Individualized Goal-Setting.  

2021-22 Deadline Application – June 22

If you are selected, there is no cost to attend the Institute; however the expectation is that you integrate your learnings in your classroom, your school community, and share with other educators in your region of Maine and beyond.  Full participants will receive documentation of contact hours. 

MAEPL PURPOSE 

The Maine Arts Education Partners in Leadership (MAEPL) is committed to developing and promoting high quality arts education for all. MAEPL operates on the premise of “teachers teaching teachers.” All of our design teams, institutes, and professional development opportunities offer/encourage collaboration.

If interested, please complete the online application form by June 22.

Returning? Complete THIS FORM  by June 22. 

Questions? Contact Martha Piscuskas, Director of Arts Education at the Maine Arts Commission, Martha.Piscuskas@maine.gov  207-287-2750

For more information ….

FLYER – CLICK HERE

MORE DETAILS – CLICK HERE

APPLICATION FORM – CLICK HERE

Listen to a message from Martha Piscuskas at THIS LINK.

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