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Congratulations Music Educators

May 24, 2017

Accomplishing at the highest level

Congratulations to the following Maine Music Educators who received awards last week during the Maine Music Educators Association annual conference at UMaine Orono.

MMEA School Admistrator of the Year: Barbara Jordan, Principal of the Albert S. Hall School, Waterville

Sue Barre, Barbara Jordan, Ciara Hargrove, Kristen Alberts

Maine Music Educator of the Year: Mike Sakash, Fryeburg Academy

Mike Sakash with Josh Bosse

Maine New Music Educator Award: Josh Champagne of Sanford High School

Ben Potvin with Josh Champagne

Dale Huff Outstanding Music Department Award – Music Educators: Ashley Albert, Jill Hodgdon, Danielle Murphy,  Heidi Anderson, Mike Scarpone and Lisa Cushman, Assistant Principal, Brunswick Junior High School representing administration

Ashley Albert, Jill Hodgdon, Danielle Murphy, Heidi Anderson, Mike Scarpone and Lisa Cushman, Assistant Principal, Brunswick Junior High School representing administration

Maine Music Educators Appreciation Award:

Brian Nadeau

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Superb All-State

May 23, 2017

Congrats on a great conference MMEA!

The registration table was well cared for with Sam Moore-Young, Ben Potvin, and UMaine music major student Micaela Ellis.

We know that it takes a village for success to happen and the many hands that planned (for months) to put together a celebratory Maine Music Educators Association (MMEA) conference are to be commended. Congratulations and a huge THANK YOU to those who took care of the many details!

All smiles in the vendor section! Pamela Kinsey, Roger Whitney, and Glen Sargent.

This year the MMEA celebrates 100 years. In fact, MMEA is the oldest professional state music association in the country. Certainly something to be proud of!!! There are many dedicated people who have come and gone during the last 100 years who have proudly lead the organization. Those who come forward and do their parts as leaders stand on the shoulders of giants! At this time Waterville music educator Sue Barre serves as President. Thank you for the endless hours and your dedication!

Fun in the Motor Booty horn section!

For those of you who are history buffs I thank music educator Sam Moore-Young, Craig Skeffington and retired music educator Bob Mode for providing the following…

Our parent organization, National Association for Music Education (NAfME) began as a small meeting of 104 music supervisors in Keokuk, Iowa in 1907 after the 1906 National Education Association (NEA) was canceled due to the San Francisco earthquake. After meeting again in 1909 in reaction to the NEA not addressing the concerns of music supervisors, the group formally organized in 1910 and called itself the Music Supervisors National Conference (MSNC).

In October 1915, at a meeting of music supervisors held in connection with the state Teachers Convention in the assembly room of Portland High School, it was decided that it was advisable to form a closer association of Maine school music teachers. A committee was formed to draw up a constitution. This was the beginning of the first state-level organization of public school music teachers in the United States.

For a number of years, the new organization, known as the Maine Music Supervisors Association (MMSA), met only once a year, at the time of the State Teachers Convention in October. At the October 1917 meeting in Bangor, with forty people in attendance, it was voted to collect dues of twenty-fie cents per year. 

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Congrats Pam Rhein

May 22, 2017

Music educator recognized

Pam Rhein receiving her award from Oxford Hill music educator Dennis Boyd, President of the Maine American Choral Directors Association.

RSU 18 Music educator Pam Rhein has been named the 2017 Maine Distinguished Choral Director by the American Choral Directors Association! A packed room of respected choral music educators from across the state stood and applauded for a VERY long time when Pam was presented her award.

Pam is busy today serving on the Arts Learning grant panel for the Maine Arts Commission. We salute you Pam on your much deserved award and wish you a warm congratulations!

 

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Scientific Research Through Art

May 21, 2017

Jill Pelto

Habitat Degradation: Ocean Acidification

Artist, Jill Pelto, is communicating scientific research through her artwork and without data and research she wouldn’t create what she does. The main topic is Global Climate Change data and her portfolio is filled with images depicting the images. Jill is tracking melting glaciers, rising sea level, threatened species, the positive and challenges. Her work addresses environmental concerns and inspires individuals to take action.  She is a true collaborator: ” I want to team up with fellow scientists, artists, and people from any discipline.”

I learned that Jill is doing graduate work, a Masters of Science, right here in Maine at the University. She is studying the behavior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet in the past. She is working with Dr. Brenda Hall. You can check out her amazing work at http://www.jillpelto.com. A real “STEAM” connection!

And, you can read about her at THIS LINK, a piece in Upworthy about her.

Measuring Crevasse Depth

 

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High School Dance Team

May 20, 2017

What room does fear have?

Great performance by the Mahomet-Seymour High School Dance Team at 

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Bonny Eagle High School

May 19, 2017

Doing STEAM work

Margaret A. (Peg)  Maxwell has been teaching art for many years at Bonny Eagle High School which is part of MSAD #6 and located in Standish, Maine.

Whenever I see Peg she is engaged in deep learning and has stories to tell about what her students are doing as well. At the end of March I bumped into Peg at LL Beans for the awards ceremony to recognize students whose art work had been selected as part of the 22nd Federal Junior Duck Conservation and Design Program. Of course Peg would involve her students in the opportunity since the program is a dynamic art- and science-based curriculum that teaches wetland and waterfowl conservation to students in kindergarten through high school.

Peg sees a connection between art and science and any opportunity to develop lessons on the learning connections, she takes advantage of. Peg says it best: “I do not intend to teach science or offer any credit for science courses in my department. My intention is to interest students in the sciences, encourage them to tap into their creative and scientific selves….and to encourage them to invent and make connections for their future learning and become leaders in education, arts, engineering and design.”

Peg and I chatted about a radio talk show discussing STEAM education in the Boy Scouts program. I did a little research and found THIS LINK on the topic. I am aware of the work in our 4H programs. You can read about a 4H curriculum connection of sewing to science at THIS LINK.

At the spring Maine Art Education Association conference Peg provided a session on the Art and Science connection. The description: Teachers will learn the process of science integration into the curriculum using the resources in their buildings. The process of collaboration will be discussed and the proper avenues to pursue in order to facilitate a successful experience for the students. Hands on workshop using journal making as their container of ideas for the units. Weather, botany, anatomy and physiology, astronomy, chemistry and other units of sciences will be reviewed as possible integration topics. A brief discussion about the importance of integration with sciences as a motivator will be part of the workshop.

If you have any questions please contact Peg. She can be reached and is always willing to share at mmaxwell@bonnyeagle.org.

“Remember the importance of the eye and that black hole called the ‘pupil’ and how it allows us to see and learn…perhaps it is our own black hole of energy that manifests into the synapses (meaning to join) of our brain.” 

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In Today’s News

May 18, 2017

Looking for a music school?

I visited the Midcoast Music Academy in the winter and included a story about the academy in April on THIS BLOG. The article below is written by Dagney C. Ernest for the Village Soup.

ROCKLAND — The downtown Midcoast Music Academy, which has grown from a one-lesson-room space and 30 students to a 2,100-square-foot suite with a faculty and more than 120 students (plus 40 on the wait list), is looking for a new hand at the wheel.

Founder/director Tom Ulichny and his wife, Anne Bardaglio, MCMA’s programs and operations manager, announced May 16 that they will be relocating to Ithaca, N.Y., this summer to be closer to their families.

“This has been an incredibly difficult decision, but … it’s the right next step for us at this time,” Ulichny wrote in the MCMA spring newsletter.

In the time since MCMA opened its doors in 2012 — those doors being above E.C. Moran Insurance on Main Street — the music school has expanded exponentially. In 2014, it moved into the multi-tenant building at the corner of Main Street and Park Drive; and in 2016, it expanded that space to almost double in order to accommodate a growing faculty and student base.

Last year, the small business also began the process of becoming a nonprofit — a logical step for an organization with a mission “to provide excellent, accessible music education to any committed student” and a policy of never turning one away. From its first year, the school has fundraised to provide scholarships for some of its private students, who have ranged from age 4 to 70-something and study classical to jazz, rock, pop and blues. This year, MCMA has awarded more than $25,000 to deserving scholarship recipients.

Berklee College of Music graduate Ulichny and his faculty also have partnered with 14 schools and organizations throughout the state to provide workshops, seminars and supplemental programming. Since its founding, MCMA has delivered lessons to more than 700 students and forged partnerships with North Atlantic Blues Fest, Maine Lobster Festival, Strand Theatre, Island Institute and RSU 13.

The need to provide support and presence for their family members brought the couple to their unexpected decision.

“It’s amazing how the universe can change things on a dime,” Ulichny said.

This spring, the couple started to realize their priority is to be close to family, he said. And they realized something else, too.

“The school can continue to grow and thrive without us — we’ve laid the foundation, and we’ve modeled it as a community music school, and therefore, it really belongs to the community,” he said.

Ulichny and Bardaglio plan to make a gift of the school and all of its assets to an individual or organization willing to continue the mission and spirit of the school. Facilities include six lesson rooms and one large ensemble room, all professionally equipped and soundproofed. There is a secured lease with Main Street frontage and the ability to expand.

The newsletter indicated the couple are currently in discussions with several nonprofit organizations (interested parties may request a summary of total assets and liabilities by contacting Ulichny). And they promised to remain actively involved throughout the upcoming transition. Their personal transition will include putting their beloved St. George house — “a lovely old fixer-upper that we’ve done a ton of work on over the past five years” — on the market.

Bardaglio, an adjunct professor at Unity College the past two years, has been offered a good position at a charter school in Ithaca doing curriculum development, as well as teaching. And Ulichny is slated to perform his soon-to-be-released EP in coming weeks on WCLZ in Portland. Opening an April 14 concert at the Strand, he previewed a trilogy from the EP that documents the wrenching process that brought him and his wife to their decision.

The three tunes encompass anger, acceptance and gratitude. The latter is reflected in a song titled “Other Hand” and includes the lyrics: “I won’t hold on/Just ’cause I built it/I don’t own it/It’s just borrowed to give away.”

 

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