Posts Tagged ‘Arts Education Month’

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What a Month!

March 31, 2017

So Long Arts Education Month

Visiting LEAPS of Imagination program

Happy last day of March and good-bye to Arts Education month. During the last month I have been fortunate to travel to many parts of the state and visit amazing programs and people doing great things in ARTS EDUCATION! Yes, I am shouting that word – I am so proud of what is going on in arts education! YOU are doing amazing work for young learners across the entire state!

Below are some of the highlights of the month – certainly not all of them. But there is only so many hours in a day, so many days in a month and only so much time to blog!!! Thank you to those who invited me to visit.

  • March 4: THANK YOU to the Dancers Making a Difference performance, Noble High School. Amazing gathering of dancers from schools and community studios which raised $6730.00 that will be combined with the funds that were raised at a performance in November at Thornton Academy $3575.00 for a total of $10,305.00. In the next week the grant will be announced. Watch for the information on the blog and consider applying. Watch a clip of the performance.
  • March 8: Arts Advocacy Day, State House, Augusta. Marshwood High School student Mikayla Smith spoke passionately about the importance of arts education. (Yes, she is the daughter of Central School (South Berwick) music educator and the 2014 York County Teacher of the Year Kate Smith!). The Hall of Flags was filled with learners of all ages.
  • March 11: MALI Winter Retreat, Thomas College, Waterville – Teacher Leaders met to review phase 6 and plan ahead to phase 7. What a great day everyone had – many ideas were generated. If you are interested in applying to be a MALI Teacher Leader this year watch for the blog post in the near future.
  • March 11: Youth Art Month opening, Portland Museum of Art, a collaboration with the Maine Art Education Association.
  • March 13: Poetry Out Loud State Finals, Waterville Opera House. See and hear Gardiner Area High School senior Gabrielle Cooper, Maine’s Champ and the 10 finalists at THIS LINK.
  • March 14: Nancy Harris Frohlich founded LEAPS of Imagination and she says: “We believe that all children are imaginative thinkers, and that if we give them the opportunity to use their imaginations in school by making art, they will thrive”. To learn more about the work Nancy does with teaching artists in classrooms please CLICK HERE.
  • March 17: Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Mega Conference held at Hebron Station School, Oxford Hills School district. The day was filled with learning – MALI Teacher Leaders provided sessions on many topics. After lunch we worked collaboratively in groups to create dancers thanks to the instruction of John Morris. Below you can view one of those dances. Thanks to MALI Teacher Leader Samantha Armstrong and Curriculum Leader Heather Manchester for hosting the mega. I understand that the other teachers in the district were having a workshop day as well. They used MALI’s model for scheduling the day! 
  • March 21: Christina Warren teaches art at Jordan Small Middle School in Raymond. There is great work (and play) going on inside and outside of Christina’s classroom. She  showed me all of the wonderful George Mason artwork that has been there since the school was built in 1988.

    Christina Warren

  • March 21: Visited Portland Stage with Julianne Shea and Hannah Cordes and what a hoot these two are. Looking for great programming in theatre? Contact either of these energized educators.
  • March 22: Teaching artist and MALI Teaching Artist Leader Tim Christensen was at Prescott School for several days working with the K-6 students and their staff where they created clay pieces that make up a large Panda – the school mascot. They’re already talking about bringing Tim back in the fall.
  • March 25: Helped with the presentation awards for the Junior Duck Stamp program held at LL Beans in Portland. Freeport High School Art teacher, Kim Medsker was so proud of her student who took topic honors.

    Kim Medsker-Mehalic with her student Min Wu who took the top honors.

  • March 29: Met with Senator Angus King’s staffers to discuss educational topics so he can be better informed. Such thoughtful colleagues that we have in our state and such a wonderful opportunity to share information and ideas. And, great to hear arts educators as well as other educators address the importance of the arts educators.

I love learning about what you and your students are accomplishing!

Junior Duck Stamp program, presentations held at LL Bean

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Monhegan for Art Teachers

February 5, 2016

Two week residency opportunity

Applications are being accepted for the Monhegan Artists’ Residency for Maine artists. In addition to two five-week residencies on Monhegan Island for Maine-based visual artists, the program offers a two-week residency for a Maine art teacher. The residency program provides living quarters, studio space, and a $150 per week stipend. The two 5-week residencies run in late spring and early fall.

Nathaniel Meyer, Wreck of the Venus, 2013, oil on canvas, 36″ x 24″

Nathaniel Meyer, Wreck of the Venus, 2013, oil on canvas, 36″ x 24″

Four years ago, recognizing the need to support artists who teach in Maine schools, the Monhegan Artists’ Residency Corporation (MARC) expanded its offerings by adding the 2-week residency in mid-summer to accommodate artists tied to a school-year schedule. This is a unique opportunity for art teachers, providing time and space for them to reflect on, experiment, or develop their art while living in an artistically historic and beautiful location. Quality of art work is the primary criterion for selection. Artists-teachers compete on equal footing with other applicants. There is no requirement to produce a body of work or to relate the experience to classroom teaching.

The three past artist-teacher recipients are: Nathaniel Meyer (2015), who teaches at Lewiston High School (http://nathaniel-meyer.com/home.html); printmaker Scott Minzy (2014), art instructor at Erskine Academy in South China, Maine (http://www.scottminzy.com/); and Melinda Campbell (2013), retired from teaching but still active as an artist.

The application deadline for all three residencies is March 15, 2016. This year applications for the residency program are being accepted on-line only. For guidelines, a history of the program, and a list of past residents, visit monheganartistsresidency.org. Applicants will be notified by April 15th of the jury’s decision.

The residency program is aimed at visual artists working in painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, or the digital arts. An important goal of the program is to enhance the careers of serious artists who have yet to gain wide recognition. The jury of art professionals this year includes MARC board member and artist Sissy Buck, Polly Saltonstall, editor of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors and noted collector of contemporary Maine art, and artist Duncan Hewitt, whose retrospective exhibition is currently on view at the Portland Museum of Art.

Founded in 1989, MARC is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by donors, art galleries, corporate sponsors, and major foundation grants. For more information please contact Susan Danly at susandanly@gmail.com or 233.0896.art

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Arts Education Month

March 1, 2015

Celebrate with students, family members, parents, grandparents by recognizing students

I have always felt grateful to be in the field of Arts education. I never lose sight of what my career choice is all about, and still base my decisions concerning arts education on this question: What is in the best interest of every student?  I am so encouraged by what is going on in education today – finally, the student is being moved to the center of the education circle. The shift for teachers is changing, we are no longer the ‘disseminater’ of information but we’re becoming the “guide on the side”. And, in my opinion, this is just the way school should be, (even if disseminater is not a word)!

I have always loved March because it is the time earmarked to celebrate students and the arts! It is  is Youth Art Month and Music in our Schools Month. Please send your stories about how you are celebrating Arts education and students stories about how the arts impact their lives. Either email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov or post your comments at the bottom of the blog.

Youth Art Month is a month of promoting art education in the United States. Screen Shot 2015-02-28 at 7.48.03 PMIt is observed in March, with thousands of American schools participating, often with the involvement of local art museums and civic organizations.

Started in 1961 through the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) and in cooperation with the National Art Education Association (NAEA), Youth Art Month exists to:

1. Recognize art education as a viable factor in the total education curricula that develops citizens of a global society.
2. Recognize art is a necessity for the full development of better quality of life for all.
3. Direct attention to the value of art education for divergent and critical thinking.
4. Expand art programs in schools and stimulate new art programs.
5. Encourage commitment to the arts by students, community organizations, and individuals everywhere.
6. Provide additional opportunities for individuals of all ages to participate in creative art learning.
7. Increase community, business and governmental support for art education.
8. Increase community understanding and interest in art and art education through involvement in art exhibits, workshops, and other creative ventures.
9. Reflect and demonstrate the goals of the National Art Education Association that work toward the improvement of art education at all levels.

See more information at: http://www.arteducators.org/news/yam

The information above is from the National Art Education Association.

In addition, March is Music In Our Schools Month

MIOSM LOGOThis a great time to highlight the importance of  comprehensive, sequential music education taught by exemplary music educators for all through concerts, lessons, and public performances and advocacy activities. Yes, we know that these are things that should be happening day in and day but this will help you to remember to pay closer attention to your students who are participate. March has been officially designated by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) for the observance of Music In Our Schools Month (MIOSM®), the time of year when music education becomes the focus of schools across the nation. MIOSM began as a single statewide celebration in 1973, and has grown over the decades to encompass a day, then a week, and then in 1985 to become a month long celebration of school music. The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that school is where all children should have access to music. MIOSM is an opportunity for music teachers to bring their music programs to the attention of the school and the community and to display the benefits school music brings to students of all ages.

See more information at http://musiced.nafme.org/events/music-in-our-schools-month/what-is-miosm/.

This information taken from the National Association for Music Education.

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Arts Education Month: March

March 1, 2013

Happy March!

As I mentioned in a post on February 11, 2013 March is a great time to promote what you do so well – teach ARTS EDUCATION. Sometimes others need to be reminded or actually taught about why the Arts are essential to a complete education for all students.

And, this is a good time for me to site this post prepared by the Education Secretary Arne Duncan’s office at the USDOE. You can find the information by clicking here. Mr. Duncan’s office had conducted a survey on arts education. It is the first survey that really provided a comparison since the first survey of this type was done during the 1999-2000 school year.

Secretary Duncan highlighted some of the findings that included:

I start from a simple presumption that I think most parents and teachers share. And that is that all students—100 percent—should have access to arts instruction. All children should have arts-rich schools.

Judged against that widely-shared standard, I think it is clear that our public schools have a long way to go before they are providing a rich and rigorous arts education to all students.

For a host of reasons, high-quality arts education is absolutely critical to providing all students with a world-class education.

The study of the arts can significantly boost student achievement, reduce discipline problems, and increase the odds that students will go on to graduate from college.

Arts education is also essential to stimulating the creativity and innovation that will prove critical to young Americans competing in a knowledge-based, global economy.

And the arts are valuable for their own sake. They empower students to create and appreciate aesthetic works. Creating by doing is a uniquely powerful way to learn.

I want to add that last, but not least, the arts are also fun. They give students a reason to look forward to coming to school.

Here are some resources that you might find useful during this exciting Arts education month:

Have a WONDERFUL ARTS EDUCATION MONTH!

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