Posts Tagged ‘band director’

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New Blog

September 8, 2020

Bill Buzza

Bill at the Richard Rodgers Theater, NYC, set of Hamilton

Many of you know veteran music educator (27 years) Bill Buzza. He’s one of those people who has a warm smile and a soft voice. And, he’s such a thoughtful person that when he enters a conversation you know he’s listening carefully to what you’re saying (and not focusing on how he’ll respond). Bill is the music teacher/band director at Edward Little High School in Auburn.

Just like the rest of us he’s been dealing with the pandemic since March 13. Always one for thinking deeply Bill decided to start a blog that will document his learning and begin a dialogue.  Bill’s calling it Teaching Instrumental Music During COVID-19.

Bill says: As I think about the coming year, I anticipate many new experiences and a journey that will redefine my career of instrumental music education.

This is a great opportunity for you to read about Bill’s experiences and know that you’re not alone. While thinking about returning to school and all the details of it Bill’s been doing research on how to play an instrument with a face mask on. Yes, of course you can read all about it on Bill’s blog. Subscribe in the sidebar of the front page of the blog.

Bill earned his M.S. Ed in Educational Leadership from the University of New England and B.M. in Music Education from the University of Southern Maine. At Edward Little High School, he conducts the concert, marching, pep and jazz bands. He also teaches three levels of guitar, and a beginning band class. Bill was a Finalist for the 2011 Maine Teacher of the Year and was chosen as a Teacher Leader, phase 1, of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI). He also served on the MALI Leadership Team.

Phase 2, MAAI/MALI, Bill front row, 1st on left

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Congrats Jerry Barry!

December 16, 2019

50 directors who make a difference

Jerry Barry, who has been teaching music for 30 years, from Falmouth High School has been selected as one of ’50 Directors Who Make a Difference’ by the School Band and Orchestra Magazine (SBO).

Each year hundreds of music teachers are nominated by students, colleagues, musical instrument retailers, parents, administrators and friends. Nominations came from all states this year and educators were nominated because someone recognizes their hard work and dedication.

Each director is asked to share their proudest teaching moments, how they hope to make a difference in students’ lives, and most important lessons they try to teach their students.

JERRY’S STORY

What is your proudest moment as an educator?

There is not one single “ah-ha” moment, but what I am most proud of is that students in the Falmouth Music Program feel respected and valued as musicians and that their efforts in the performing arts matter, both within our school and the larger community. The music program is important in the town of Falmouth and it enjoys broad support from parents, teachers, and administrators. Students have a place and a space to excel as performers. The success of the K-12 music department is due to an engaging, active, purposeful collaboration of the district’s performing arts teachers supporting the education of our great students who are highly motivated and eager to learn.

How do you hope to make a difference in your students’ lives?

I hope to engage the students in a way that is enjoyable, meaningful, and encouraging to them and their effort to learn. I make a consistent effort to connect individually with the young person trying to play well on their instruments, now and in the future. They want to succeed. I strive to learn about them and their interests beyond band. Most often a bit of humor in class works really well. When there is a fun atmosphere, it promotes a positive student/teacher relationship, and then the teacher can more easily help the students connect to the content – performing music!

 

What’s the most important lesson that you try to teach your students?

Personal improvement is what matters most. No matter who you are or what you are doing, people should always strive to do their best …to be a bit better tomorrow. Start with where you are, dig in, persevere, and keep moving forward. Swimmers and runners try to be just a little bit faster each time they go out. Not everyone wins, but the goal is “personal best”. There is an opportunity for everyone to provide their own unique contribution to their ensemble.

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In Today’s News

December 27, 2016

Educator of the Year by Music & Arts – Amy Delorge

Biddeford Middle School band director Amy Delorge has been named Music Educator of the Year by Music & Arts, a nationwide retailer of band and orchestra equipment. Yay for Amy and CONGRATS!

Read the entire article from the Portland Press Herald by CLICKING HERE.

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