Posts Tagged ‘Bangor High School’

h1

Arts Learning Grant Recipient

April 9, 2018

Bangor High School

Potter and MALI Teaching Artist Tim Christensen

“Sharks, tarpan migration, stingrays. Canoeing in deeper water while a dolphin gave birth under the boat. No tolerance for being bored. I had something to say. Being a potter let’s me capture information and communicate it in a durable way. In 500 years what do you want someone to know about you, what your life is like in 2018”?

These are some of the stories that teaching artist Tim Christensen shares when he visits classrooms – stories of how he got where he is and how he is living in Maine and working as an artist. He shares why he does what he does and how it came to be. He started out selling text books after majoring in writing in college. But at age 28 after losing his job he took time to consider what he really wanted to do.

Earlier this month I visited Bangor High School while they had Tim working with their students from all three of their art teachers students. The school received a Maine Arts Commission (MAC) Arts Learning grant to provide this opportunity.

Tim makes clay bowls by throwing them on a potter’s wheel and uses the sgraffito process to decorate the pottery. Sgraffito is made by scratching through a surface to reveal the lower layer of contrasting color.

I’ve visited Tim in action in other classrooms and its always interesting to see where he is in his development as an artist and as a teacher. The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) is pleased to have Tim as a Teaching Artist Leader and on the Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artist roster. It is clear from the teacher and student responses that Tim did a fabulous job and impacted students and teachers during during his four days at the school.

ART TEACHER EVA WAGNER’S REFLECTIONS

Tim Christensen was such a refreshing presence in our classroom. His knowledge, skills, talent, creativity and energy inspired our students to create truly unique artwork. I learned so much from him in just a few days and I am hoping to get him to come back and work with my classes again.

He is a great story teller and he really took an interest in the students’ artwork. They really responded to him personally.

Working with a professional artist is such a valuable experience to give to our youth. It helps them to see fine art as a viable career and exposes them to a whole new way of working and caliber of work. Often high school teachers, like myself, become a sort of jack of all trades because of the amount of time we spend teaching and preparing different lessons. A professional artist has the luxury to focus which raises their production and craftsmanship –  it is wonderful to be able to expose the students to someone who works in this way.

STUDENT REFLECTIONS

  • I enjoyed working with a professional artist because it’s broadening who we learn from. It was cool working with someone who makes and sells art for a living.
  • I learned that quality is better than quantity. I would love to work with this artist again.
  • I enjoyed that Tim took the time to teach us individually and took interest in our art. I also enjoyed the story he told us about sailing across the Pacific ocean.
  • It makes us realize that there are artists out there that make a living from their art. It broadens our outlook on art and gives us perspective of art in the real world.
  • It was inspiring to hear someone’s personal story of how they became a professional potter.
  • I learned about creating sgraffito that tells a story on pottery. I would love to learn more about throwing with Tim Christensen.
  • I liked hearing about Tim’s life story and how he started art. He had many interesting views on art and how he saw the world because of his art. His art itself was incredible, and I had never heard of the techniques he used.
  • Having a Teaching Artist in the classroom can further your understanding of a subject to have someone that is specialized in that art. They can inspire students with their story and give hands on advice.
  • It helped me to see what it would be like to be a professional artist.
  • I enjoyed it because I got to work with a professional on my favorite subject.
  • I learned that there were more than just the few art styles that I’ve learned about over the years so far.
  • I learned how to do sgraffito and that sometimes you don’t need to work from an immediate drawing, you can just start from nothing and keep going from there.
  • It allows you to explore ideas and techniques you might not normally do.  It allows you to learn from them, and hear their stories and get new ideas.  It dispels the idea that artists are unapproachable. It allows you to see other career options beyond lawyer, doctor, teacher, etc.
  • Working with a professional artist was really nice and eye opening to see what his type of life is like. He was a really good artist that was super different from any work that we’ve done in school but it was really eye opening. He was really nice and helped me personally open my eyes to doing different work that was outside my comfort zone.
  • Tim Christensen taught me to step outside my comfort zone and to realize that when I think I’m done with an art piece, if there is still open space on my work, then I am not done. He helped me make my work better and was overall a good teacher.
  • He was an excellent teacher, and had a thoughtful answer to everything we asked.

ART TEACHER ERIC HUTCHINS REFLECTIONS

Many of our students want to become professional artists, but it is a scary thought for them and even their parents to survive as an artist. It is really nice for them to see a Maine artist that is successful at what he does! Tim was able to introduce new and different techniques to many different classes, and offer opportunity for ceramic works to classes that would never get a chance to experience that. Every opportunity students have can open new doors for them.

Tim’s stories about his travels around the world set it apart from other artists that have spoken to our students. His travels and stories connect to the art that he creates, so the students can hear and see the stories at the same time.

We had teachers from other departments visit while he was presenting and even had the opportunity to create their own work with him. They were as engaged as the students.

Students were so impressed with how incredible his work was they were captured by him at the very beginning. It was nice to be “on the outside” and see the students entire conceptual process with the art and see how they react to someone else. It provides you with insight in how students understand and comprehend what is being taught.

PRINCIPAL PAUL BUTLER’S REFLECTIONS

The quality of the contact between Tim and the students was outstanding, and he brought great energy to his visit. Technique sharing is one thing, but interacting with a practicing artist in the way that our students were able to is quite another– and will have a lasting impact on them.

TIM CHRISTENSEN’S REFLECTIONS

I see my value as a teaching artist to be manifold. I create connective tissue in the arts education field by helping people to network, and by connecting art teachers working on the same ideas. I also can bring specialized knowledge into the classroom, whether it be about natural history, technical clay knowledge, or professional and funding opportunities. For the students, I am a fresh face with no baggage, someone who is working in the field of fine art, and is very comfortable sharing all of my professional knowledge. I also provide a platform from which the students can speak and be heard, by stressing the communicative, content bearing parts of any art project.

I very much enjoy teaching the sgraffito technique as a communication tool that transcends culture and/or time. In a way, sgraffito was the original emoji. I urge the students to think about what they would like to say to someone five hundred years hence, and to create artwork that is capable of doing that. I am successful when I have empowered students to speak using their visual voice and to create from a place that is uniquely theirs, confident that they will be heard and that what they have to say matters in the global conversation about our world.

h1

Poetry Out Loud State Finals

March 7, 2016

March 15, 3:00 PM, Waterville Opera House

THE MAINE ARTS COMMISSION ANNOUNCES POETRY OUT LOUD STATE FINALS
Maine High School Students Compete in National Poetry Recitation Contest

Augusta, ME—The Maine Arts Commission is presenting the 2016 Maine State Finals for Poetry Out Loud, a National Poetry Recitation Contest, on March 15 at 3 p.m. at the Waterville Opera House. The competition, presented in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation, is free and open to the public. Jennifer Rooks, MPBN’s Public Affairs Host, will be the emcee. Doors open to the public at 2:30 p.m. and no tickets are required.

Poetry Out Loud encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Since Poetry Out Loud began, millions of students at more than 7,300 schools nationwide have been involved. This school year, almost 10,000 Maine students have participated in the program, providing them with an opportunity to master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage.

“Poetry Out Loud is one of many examples of high-quality, partnership-based programs that the NEA offers to schools and communities across the country,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “By helping students foster creative thinking skills and inspire self-expression, we are laying a foundation for lifelong learning in the arts.”

Poetry Out Loud is organized by the NEA and the Poetry Foundation, and is administered at the state level by the Maine Arts Commission. It began this year in Maine’s high schools where each school selected a champion to compete in a regional competition. From the two regional finals, 10 students were selected to compete in the State Finals. One student will move on from the State Finals to represent Maine at the National Finals in Washington D.C., where students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico will compete for a total of $50,000 in awards and school stipends for the purchase of poetry books.

Congratulations to the following students who will participate in the Maine State Finals at the Waterville Opera House:
•  Lydia Caron, Bangor High School
•  Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School
•  Shiloh Munsen, Freeport High School
•  Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School
•  Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy
•  Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School
•  Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School
•  Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School
•  Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School
•  Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School

For more information, please visit http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/POL-Home or contact Argy Nestor, Maine Arts Commission Director of Arts Education at argy.nestor@maine.gov or 207-287-2713.

The Maine Arts Commission shall encourage and stimulate public interest and participation in the cultural heritage and cultural programs of our state; shall expand the state’s cultural resources; and shall encourage and assist freedom of artistic expression for the well being of the arts, to meet the needs and aspirations of persons in all parts of the state.

Southern Region State Finalists left to right: Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School; Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School; Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School; Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School; Shilo Munsen, Freeport High School

Southern Region State Finalists left to right: Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School; Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School; Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School; Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School; Shilo Munsen, Freeport High School

Northern Region State Finalists left to right: Lydia Caron, Bangor High School; Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School; Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy; Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School; Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School

Northern Region State Finalists left to right: Lydia Caron, Bangor High School; Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School; Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy; Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School; Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School

h1

Congrats Student Artists!

May 2, 2015

Congressional Art Awards

The Congressional Art Competition began in 1982 to provide an opportunity for Members of Congress to encourage and recognize the artistic talents of their young constituents. Since then, over 700,000 high school students have competed for the honor of having their work shown in the U.S. Capitol.

The competition is open to all high school students. The overall winner of each participating district will have the opportunity to have their work displayed in the Cannon Tunnel of the U.S. Capitol for the entire year, beginning in June. In addition, winners will be flown to Washington, D.C. for the official opening of the show in June.

Congratulations to the following students who are being honored this year, 2015

  DISTRICT ONE

   DISTRICT TWO

   WINNER
    WINNER
 
   Self Portrait  acrylic     The Widow  white charcoal
   Djordje Jevtic
   Grade 12, Scarborough High School
   Art Teacher: Erin Landry-Fowler 
    Liam Reading

    Grade 12, Bangor High School
    Art Teacher: Kal Elmore
   FIRST RUNNER UP     FIRST RUNNER UP
 
   Self Portrait  graphite     Airport  ink pen
   Anna Kinee
   Grade 12, Brunswick High School

   Art Teacher: Allison Price

    Youjin Choi
    Grade 11, Foxcroft Academy

    Art Teacher: Jane Blay

    SECOND RUNNER UP     SECOND RUNNER UP
   
    After the Music is Over  charcoal     Mirror’s Reflection  charcoal
    Olivia Potter

    Grade 10, Morse High School

    Art Teacher: Heather Monsen

    Maxwell Clarrage
    Grade 11, Lewiston High School

    Art Teacher: Nathaniel Meyer

    HONORABLE MENTION     HONORABLE MENTION
   
    Living in a Bottle  photography     Inside the Yellow Room  gouache
    Kailey Coleman

    Grade 12, Noble High School

    Art Teacher: Ginny Vakalis

    Jingfei Zhou

    Grade 12, Gould Academy

    Art Teacher: Lauren Head

    HONORABLE MENTION     HONORABLE MENTION
   
    Lips  acrylic     Pores  photography
    Haleigh McKechnie

    Grade 12, Thornton Academy

    Art Teacher: Jennifer Merry

    Riley Hemmings

    Grade 11, Hebron Academy

    Art Teacher: Jeanine Eschenbach

    HONORABLE MENTION     HONORABLE MENTION
   
    The Bermuda Triangle  digital      Menenius  digital 
    Lily Munro

    Grade 10, Brunswick High School

    Art Teacher: Colleen Kearney-Graffam

    Meghan McDunnah

    Grade 12, Mount Desert Island High School

    Art Teacher: Charlie Johnson

Congresswoman Chellie Pingree and Congressman Bruce Poliquin  are delighted to announce the winners of the 2015 Congressional Arts Awards in Maine’s Congressional districts.

Pingree congratulates Djordje Jevtic, an exchange student from Belgrade, Serbia, who is attending Scarborough High School, for his winning artwork, “Self Portrait,” a distinctive work in acrylic.

“I’m always amazed by the quality of work that Maine students submit to this competition,” said Pingree. “I’m excited that Djordje’s work will represent our state at the Capitol—it shows a lot of talent. Winning the competition should be a great memory of Maine for him to bring back home,” “My thanks and congratulations go to all the students who participated this year, the art teachers who inspire them, and the Maine Arts Commission for coordinating this wonderful event. ”

Poliquin acknowledged Liam Reading, a senior at Bangor High School, as this year’s winner for Maine’s Second District for his white charcoal piece, “The Widow.”

“I continue to be amazed by the extraordinary talent and work of our Maine high school students,” said Poliquin. “Congratulations to Liam, and everyone who entered the competition, for sharing their artistic gifts.”

For information about the Congressional Art Competition please contact Julie Horn at the Maine Arts Commission, at 207-287-2790 or julie.horn@maine.gov

h1

In Today’s News

January 29, 2015

Bangor High Arts Academy

A great opportunity for student artists of all kinds is underway at Bangor High School. Renee Ordway has the story.

http://www.foxbangor.com/news/local-news/7630-video-bangor-high-arts-academy-gives-students-unique-opportunity.html

 

h1

Field Trip, Bangor High School

December 19, 2014

AP art classes

The following information was provided by Kal Elmore, Bangor High School art teacher.

Every year a special field trip experience is planned for the Advanced Placement Art classes at Bangor High School. This year’s field trip was stellar!

The day began with a stop at Jim Linehan’s studio in Bangor. We arrived at Jim’s studio bright and early (8:20 AM in fact). Jim graciously allowed us to see the studio space and his work – current work as well as some work from years past. Linehan is preparing for a big exhibit this summer and is working purposefully toward this goal. The artist discussed his process, where he gets his ideas and motivation, and other topics of interest to the students.

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 8.47.14 PMThe next stop was Lord Hall at the University of Maine. After viewing the installation by Dudley Zopp, Department Chair Michael Grillo led a discussion of the work. Grillo also talked about the programs offered at UM and gave students a tour of the art classrooms in Lord Hall. The group also toured the Sculpture building before having lunch at the Union.

After lunch, Susan Groce gave a tour of the studio spaces in the new Wyeth Center – drawing, painting, and printmaking studios are large and well lit.

This is when the classes were split – Kal Elmore’s AP Studio Art class went to the printmaking studio to do a mono-printing workshop. Susan Groce showed examples, described the process, explained how the space would be used, etc. The ten students quickly got to work and each created three mono-prints using the different techniques described.

The AP 2-D class learned about the history and photographic styles of Pin Hole and Holga photography with Michael Grillo, including a photo shoot around the University of Maine campus with pin hole lenses and Holga cameras. After the photo shoot these students toured the New Media facilities with Owen Smith​ and got an opportunity to see 3D printers, laser cutters, digital sewing machines, and vaccuum forming machines with Sean Taylor.

This was a great opportunity to partner with the UM Art Department. The day was informative and interesting. All students had the opportunity to learn about art and post secondary options.

As a follow-up Kal has a colleague who is a Geospatial Educator that joined them on the trip. She created this presentation that I think you will find interesting http://bit.ly/1wlbyO7.

 

 

h1

Fine Arts Academy

October 1, 2014

Bangor HIgh School

 Susan Bryand works with Fine Arts Academy students during a summer enrichment activity

Susan Bryand works with Fine Arts Academy students during a summer enrichment activity

Bangor High School is the largest high school in the region with a student population around 1200. The school prides itself on helping each student to strive for academic excellence.

A few years ago, Bangor High School started a STEM Academy for motivated science and math students. The Fine Arts Academy is based on that model and is designed to enhance the opportunities for students who are interested in the arts. The Visual Arts component of the Academy will start this fall, with Theater and Music components coming in the near future. The Academy has had strong support from school administrators and the school board voted unanimously to approve it.

When we designed the Academy we looked at several models and talked about what would work for Bangor High students and we believe the plan will be very successful here. The BHS art teachers are very excited to have this opportunity as we continue to encourage art students to get the most out of their high school experience and work to provide additional enrichment opportunities whenever possible.

The main elements of the Fine Arts Academy (Visual Arts strand) plan include:

  1. A course for freshmen called The Creative Process. This is the foundation course and expands the Art I curriculum in numerous ways.
  2. Students in The Creative Process will earn honors credit by completing studio and writing assignments pertinent to the course.
  3. A quarterly seminar based on a theme or topic and offered to all BHS advanced art students will extend learning about artists, techniques, career exploration, community art connections, etc.
  4. Summer enrichment options for students include summer assignments, independent work, mentoring/internship opportunities, and group activities.
  5. Honors credit option for all advanced art classes for Academy students – more depth and breadth.
  6. Three distinct pathways to earning the Academy endorsement on student graduation certificates – Drawing/Painting, Digital/Commercial Art, and 3-D Design options. Each pathway culminates in an AP Art course.
  7. A Capstone exhibit during the spring of each student’s senior year – will include a portfolio, an artist statement, documentation of the artist’s process, and a formal presentation of student accomplishment.
  8. Additional options for community art connections will be encouraged.
  9. Fine Arts Academy students take all the regular classes offered at BHS and will take at least 6 art credits during their 4 years.
  10. This program will help prepare students for a wide range of post secondary options.

Twenty students have accepted the challenge and have signed up to take The Creative Process and to be a part of the BHS Fine Arts Academy. Eight sophomores have also opted to be part of the program. We are off to a great start and are looking forward to seeing great results from this innovative program.

This post was contributed by art teacher, Kal Elmore, Bangor High School. For further information please contact Kal at kelmore@bangorschools.net or colleagues Susan Bryand at sbryand@bangorschools.net, or Eric Hutchins at ehutchins@bangorschools.net.

h1

Artwork at the Capitol in DC

May 14, 2014

Congressional Art Awards announced

Congressman Michael Michaud and Congresswoman Chellie Pingree are delighted to announce the winners of the 2014 Congressional Arts Awards in Maine’s Congressional districts.

Screen Shot 2014-05-12 at 5.26.40 PMCongressman Michaud congratulates Jessica Chen a senior of Bangor High School for her winning artwork, “Floating,” which is a pastel. Congresswoman Pingree then announced that Elena Laustsen, a junior at Oceanside High School East in Rockland, as winner of the 2014 Congressional Art Competition for Maine’s First District with her color pencil drawing, “Salmon.”

“This year we had another impressive batch of submissions from some of Maine’s talented students,” said Michaud. “Congratulations to Jessica and all of the runners-up for their outstanding work. I can’t help but smile with pride every time I walk into the Capitol and pass the artwork on display from our district.”

The runners-up and honorable mentions also all hail from Bangor High. Siblings Abbey and Morgan Kidder received first and second runner-up, respectively; while Nick Fournier and Shirley Yuen received honorable mentions.

“The quality of work that Maine students produce for this competition is always impressive—and this year was no exception. I’m very proud to have Elena’s lovely study of a salmon represent our District at the Capitol. It says a lot about the wildlife and natural places that make our state unique,” said Pingree. “My thanks and congratulations go to all the students who participated this year, the art teachers who’ve fostered their talent, and the Maine Arts Commission for coordinating this fantastic event.”

Screen Shot 2014-05-12 at 5.26.50 PMThe judges also recognized the work of four other First District students—1st runner-up Caitlyn Duffy of Gorham, 2nd runner-up Veronica Jones of Readfield, and honorable mentions Elizabeth Brown of Manchester and Theresa Gervais of Chelsea. And from the Second District – 1st runner-up , Abbey Kidder of Bangor 2nd runner-up Morgan Kidder of Bangor, and honorable mentions Shirley Yuen of Bangor and Nick Fournier of Bangor.

The 2014 first place winners, Elena Laustsen and Jessica Chen will be joined by four runners-up from each congressional district when they meet with representatives from the Congressional Offices at a Blaine House reception held in their honor. This event is the culmination of a close partnership between the Maine Arts Commission and Maine’s Congressional offices. Both of Maine’s congressional delegates support this program enthusiastically and have provided their full support throughout the process.

CONGRATULATIONS to proud art teachers Holly Smith, teacher of Elena Laustsen, Sarah Dolley teacher of Caitlyn Duffy, and Linda Phillips, teacher of Veronica Jones and Theresa Gervais, Kal Elmore, teacher of Jessica Chen and Shirley Yuen, and Eric Hutchins, teacher of Morgan and Abbey Kidder and Nick Fournier.

 

%d bloggers like this: