Posts Tagged ‘creative youth development’

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Downtown Aurora Visual Arts

July 9, 2018

Amazing work

The Americans for the Arts Education Council members visited and took a walking tour led by Karina Banuelos in the neighborhood of the Downtown Aurora Visual Arts (DAVA). Twenty five years ago an artist from Aurora, CO started a project with young kids in the community creating a mosaic. After two years of work the mosaic was installed on the side of a building in the heart of Aurora. The students asked if they could continue visiting the artists’ studio and the Downtown Aurora Visual Arts was born. From day one they’ve been evaluating this creative youth development program and the data has been aligned with a bump in the test scores in the nearby schools. Consequently the program is supported by the school district. The positive impact has been continuous on young people and the community. They are doing cutting edge work in multiple programs from drawing classes to an engaging job training program.

Aurora is only a 25 minute car ride from Denver and the arts community successfully meets the needs of young people and families. Working with teaching artists and a dedicated staff it is a fine example of not just surviving but thriving. The Americans for the Arts Education Council members visited and took a walking tour in the neighborhood.

The art center was alive with students from young elementary through high school. Creative Youth Development at it’s best. We saw an amazing exhibit that was created in connection with many science topics; nutrition, the body system, parasites, bacteria, microbioms.

Their programs build upon each other starting with young children, ages 2-6, and their parents two days a week. The after school programs services 100 kids a week and the program continues throughout the summer with even more learners. The clay program had 30 students of all ages – learning from and with each other. This summer they will mix their own glazes so students can be introduced to chemistry.

The Job Training program had students solving a murder mystery while creating a plaster skeleton learning about tissues, bones, and the anatomy of a human. They combined science and art to help solve the identity of the person. In addition they were learning about how to take care of their own body.

For the past nine years they’ve had a film program which partners with the Colorado Film School located close by.  They’ve had students receive recognition at the state and national Scholastic awards program for PSA films that they’ve created.

Their creative youth development program continues to move young people forward in the experiential learning environment filled with student choice and voice. Originally their goal was to get kids to and through high school. Their success has raised the bar and now they are getting into college and some return to give back by working at the art center.

Info below is from a handout provided to us:

Downtown Aurora Visual Arts (DAVA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to strengthening the Aurora community through the arts, with a primary focus on youth engagement. By providing a safe learning environment for youth ages three to 17, DAVA programs reinforce 21st century life skills, build self-esteem, and connect youth to the community. DAVA represents a unique combination of arts education and youth development, demonstrating how quality arts programming during after- school hours forms a critical framework for long-term youth success. DAVA reinforces the message that youth are an integral part of community cultural development and in 2016 received the National Arts and Humanities Youth Programs Award (NAHYP) for providing a solution for urban communities through its model of creative youth development, combining excellence in the arts with positive youth development. DAVA “taps the untapped potential” in young people by providing access tocreative programming year-round.

In addition, DAVA takes a lead role in organizing the Colorado Alliance for Creative Youth Development (http://cocreativeyouthalliance.org/). We regularly meet with 10 community-based arts organizations to share best practices and evaluation methodology, as well as advocate for creative youth development opportunities across the state. Members have benefitted from the use of a common survey—to track youth outcomes both in terms of arts skills and youth development, use data for improvement of programs, monitor feedback from youth, share results, and advocate for dedicated support for young people who benefit from experiential learning with an emphasis on equity and access.

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Creative Youth Development

May 2, 2018

Creative potential in youth

The Creative Youth Development National Partnership, in concert with more than 650 cross-sector stakeholders nationally, is calling for all young people to have equitable access to opportunities to: realize their creative potential;  live richer, fuller lives; and develop the critical learning and life skills they need to become active contributors to their communities.

The resulting Creative Youth Development National Blueprint identifies three strategic priorities for advancing CYD:

  • VISIBILITY & IMPACT: Documenting and Communicating Outcomes and Impact
  • FUNDING: Expanding Pathways to Funding
  • FIELD BUILDING: Professional Development, Networking, and Technical Assistance

The CYD National Partnership will host an online forum in May to discuss the Blueprint’s three strategic priority areas.

Creative youth development is a long-standing practice that integrates creative skill-building, inquiry, and expression with positive youth development principles. In these programs, young people create original work—including animated films, 3-D printed sculptures, dance and theater productions, musical compositions, curated book collections, and more—and apply their creative skills to solve problems, shape their lives, and imagine and build the world in which they want to live.

With support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the CYD National Partnership—which includes the National Guild for Community Arts Education, Americans for the Arts, the Mass Cultural Council, and formerly the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities—gathered input on strategies to expand the reach and impact of CYD through numerous community conversations throughout the country over an 18-month period.

Woven throughout the Blueprint are core values of the CYD coalition: racial equity and social justice, youth voice, and collective action. Read the Executive Summary.

“Creative youth development has the unique potential to deepen and sustain youth engagement by providing opportunities for youth to develop their creative potential, amplify their voices, and build leadership skills,” said Jonathan Herman, Executive Director of the National Guild for Community Arts Education. “For many youth, CYD programs also can be a pathway to other services such as college and career readiness, mental health services, academic support, and more.”

Participants in this national movement include youth, practitioners, researchers, funders, policy makers, and other stakeholders in creative youth development and allied sectors. The Partnership also commissioned research by the Forum for Youth Investment that mapped opportunities for alignment, e.g. developing social emotional competence; promoting healthy decision making/behaviors; and reengaging young people in positive learning and work environments, among CYD and allied youth sectors, including afterschool, juvenile justice, mental health, education, and workforce development. Three cross-sector Action Teams were then formed to analyze and distill the research and stakeholder inputs and make final recommendations for the Blueprint.

“Providing today’s youth with the skills they need to lead fulfilling lives across all economic, social, and family circumstances is a large-scale undertaking,” said Erik Peterson, Vice President of Policy, Afterschool Alliance. “To do this urgent work effectively, we must work together to share lessons learned, networks, and resources.”

The Blueprint will evolve as implementation unfolds and will be updated online to reflect progress toward goals.

READ THE CYD NATIONAL ACTION BLUEPRINT

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Creative Youth Development

March 29, 2017

2017 webinar series

Announcing the 2017 Creative Youth Development Webinar Series
The Creative Youth Development National Partnership is producing a year-long webinar series designed to increase understanding of creative youth development (CYD) practice, build capacity, and advance the field.

The first three webinars are focused on CYD fundamentals. In the months ahead, we’ll be adding to this exciting line-up with deeper dives into the five imperatives of the CYD national policy agenda, including webinars on cross-sector collaboration, documenting and communicating impact, promoting youth leadership, and more.

Creative Youth Development: What’s in a Name?
Wednesday, April 5, 1 – 2:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by the National Guild for Community Arts Education

Creative Youth Development (CYD) intentionally integrates learning in the arts, humanities, and sciences with youth development principles. In CYD programs, young people create work and apply their creative skills to solve problems, shape their lives and build the world in which they want to live. The 2014 National Summit for CYD generated new focus and energy in CYD, catalyzing collective action (e.g., CYD National Partnership, Alliance for Creative Youth Development). Through case study examples, discussion, and student work, we’ll explore what it means to create and sustain programs for youth through this framework.

Presenters:

Nicole Amri, Program Director, Say Si, San Antonio, TX
Karen LaShelle, Executive Director, Creative Action, Austin, TX
Denise Montgomery, Director, Creative Youth Development National Initiative
Youth Artists from Creative Action and Say Si

Five Effective Models of Creative Youth Development Practice
Monday, April 24, 1 – 2:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by the National Guild for Community Arts Education

In this dynamic “TED Talk-style” webinar, representatives of five exemplary creative youth development organizations will share how their programs are sparking young people’s creativity and building critical learning and life skills that carry into adulthood. Through short-form, energetic presentations by A Reason to Survive, Community MusicWorks, DAVA, Destiny Arts Center, and Harmony Project, you’ll learn about several, interrelated CYD practices including:

Integrating youth voice and leadership into core organizational structures and programs
Creating opportunities for young people to create a more just and equitable society
Establishing young people as key leaders in community development efforts
Preparing young people for transitions into college and careers
Supporting young people holistically
This showcase will send provide you and your team with inspiration and new ideas for how to create, develop, and advocate for successful creative youth development programs.

Presenters:

Matt D’Arrigo, Founder & CEO, A Reason to Survive (ARTS), National City, CA
Jon Hinojosa, Artistic & Executive Director, Say Si, San Antonio, TX
Susan Jenson, Executive Director, DAVA, Aurora, CO
Chloe Kline, Education Director, Community MusicWorks, Providence, RI
Myka Miller, Executive Director, Harmony Project, Los Angeles, CA
Rashidi Omari, Teaching Artist & Co-Director of Destiny Youth Performance Company, Destiny Arts Center, Oakland, CA
Program Alumni

Youth Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities
Thursday, April 27, 4 – 5:30pm ET
Register for this free webinar presented by Massachusetts Cultural Council

This webinar is designed to increase the knowledge of a youth development approach as it applies to quality arts learning using examples, theory, and frameworks for integrating youth development practice into arts programs. The webinar will provide a definition of positive youth outcomes and the youth development approach in addition to examining levels of youth participation in arts, science, and humanities based programs. Finally, the webinar will provide an introduction to the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project framework for designing, evaluating, and reflecting on youth development as an essential component of high quality creative youth development programming.

Presenters:

Eryn Johnson, Executive Director, Community Art Center, Cambridge, MA
Laurie Jo Wallace, Director of Training and Capacity Building, Health Resources in Action, Boston, MA

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