Posts Tagged ‘Educational Theatre Association’

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Theatre Professional Development

February 18, 2018

UMaine Orono

You’re invited to the second annual Theatre Professional Development Day hosted by the Department of Theatre, University of Maine, Orono, on April 25, 2018.  Visit the WEBSITE for more information about our feature performance, “Ripple of Hope”, a one-woman show performance by Karen Sklaire, a NYC performer and teacher, and our six workshops by professional teaching artists:
  • Nick Turner, Executive Director, The Grand, Ellsworth
  • Hannah Cordes, Education Manager, Portland Stage
  • Amy Roeder, Director of Education, Penobscot Theatre Company
  • Rebecca Wright, Ellsworth High School
  • Hilary Martin, Vassalboro Schools
  • Rick Osann, Bonny Eagle High School
The $25 registration fee includes lunch.  Six Contact hours will be provided. To REGISTER or for more information, visit our WEBSITE, or as always, drop a note with any questions.  We hope to see you there!
If you have any questions please contact Rick Osann at Bonny Eagle High School at rosann@bonnyeagle.org.
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Northeast Educational Theatre Festival

December 21, 2017
USM, Gorham

The Northeast Educational Theatre Festival at USM, Gorham, January 19-20, will offer a full slate of professional development workshops for teachers with some useful and exciting programs. Professional development workshops will be offered in all five sessions of the weekend, two sessions in the afternoon of Friday, January 19 and three in the morning and afternoon of Saturday, January 20.
Check out the workshop descriptions below and visit the Northeast Website for more information about the Festival, or contact Rick Osann, rosann@bonnyeagle.org for more information.. Bring your students or come on your own!
REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS 5 JANUARY!!

Teacher Professional Development Workshops

Jim Palmarini

Advocating for Advocacy: Strategies for Achieving Positive Change
Presenter: Jim Palmarini, Educational Theatre Association
Join EdTA Director of Educational Policy James Palmarini for a discussion about the state and local policies, issues, and legislation that impact theatre education in New England and how you can build relationships with the key stakeholders and organizations that can help you effect positive change. We’ll move into a roundtable dialogue in which attendees can share their specific advocacy challenges and successes and wrap up with a “next steps for change” brainstorming exercise.

Rick Osann

Writing Meaningful Standards for Performance
Presenter: Rick Osann, Bonny Eagle High School

Having trouble writing meaningful standards that really get to the heart of what you want your students to learn? We’ll review the language in a variety of standards, performance indicators and rubrics (tasks), then observe a student performance and try to write our own language to identify what we wanted the student to learn. We’ll also try to find clear language to identify what differentiates “Meets” (3) from “Partially Meets” (the dreaded 2 or 2.5). We hope you will come out of this with some practical assessments you can use in your classroom.

Hannah Cordes

 

The Play’s The Thing: Acting Shakespeare
Presenter: Hannah Cordes, Portland Stage

The focus of this workshop will be activating Shakespeare’s language through play and on-your-feet activities. We will explore the use of language, status, group play, rhetoric, physical storytelling, and more!

Ovations Offstage: Tableaus of Courage: How to Help Students Engage with Complex Content through Theater
Presenter: Catherine Anderson, Portland Ovations

Catherine Anderson

Ovations Offstage Director Catherine Anderson will introduce workshop participants to Ovations Dynamic School-Time Performance Series for 2018-19, and model for teachers how to help students engage with any story, or content (fictional or not) through the use of the “tableau”. Tableau is a wordless theater activity for small groups of students that can be adapted for any age group. Participants will leave with a lesson plan with clear learning targets, and assessment criteria. Most recently Catherine presented this workshop to over three hundred eight graders at Scarborough Middle School to help students integrate and grapple with concepts of discrimination and segregation as part of their unit on Japanese Internment Camps.

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Celebrate: March and the Arts!

March 1, 2017

Happy Arts Education Month!

YAHOO! We have a great opportunity this month to celebrate the amazing work and accomplishments of students in the visual and performing arts. CONGRATULATIONS to all the educators who provide an excellent arts education and access to it for learners of all ages. I know that you are proud of your students and I encourage you to take advantage of this month designated to celebrate arts education. Whether you do it in a small or large way, please let me know about the work you are doing so I can let others know. Your good ideas should be shared so others can learn from you! And, a great big THANK YOU for your commitment to visual and performing arts education!

MY SUGGESTION: Take advantage of Arts Education Month to engage others in the conversation of why a quality arts education is essential for all students.

Below are the professional organizations who provide many suggestions and links to ideas to help you and your students plan for a celebration.

NAEA

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-40-12-pmThe National Art Education Association has been celebrating Youth Art Month since the 1960’s. Check out what the National Art Education has to offer on the topic by using the key words “youth art month” in the search bar on the site. The purpose of YAM is to emphasize the value to children from participating in visual art education.

CFAE

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-56-21-pmThe Council for Art Education at provides tons of resources to help you plan. They have ideas on their site that teachers and students are engaged in across the country. The ideas range from school based to community, both large and small. You can sign up for their free newsletter and receive information on a regular basis.

NAfME

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-7-54-48-pmThe National Association for Music Education has been recognizing Music in Our Schools Month since 1985. The idea started in 1973.  You can learn what NAfME has to offer on MIOSM by CLICKING HERE. The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children – and to remind citizens that schools is where all children should have access to music.

EDTA

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-12-23-pmscreen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-04-06-pmThe Educational Theatre Association and the International Thespian Society have partnered with American Alliance for Theatre & Education (AATE) to sponsor Theatre in Our Schools. For ideas on how to create a celebration CLICK HERE. Their resources are directed towards Thespians, schools, and educators. The purpose is to raise public awareness of the impact of theatre education and draw attention to the need for more access to quality programs for all students.

NDEO

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-8-27-36-pmThe National Dance Education Organization celebrates the artistic and academic achievements of exceptional students through the National Honor Society for Dance Arts (NAHSDA) by teaming up with the US Department of Education during March. Learn more about their advocacy work by CLICKING HERE.

As you’re contemplating your March celebration checking out the blog post I included last year at this time can provide you with more resources. CLICK HERE for that blog post from March 1, 2016.

AFTA

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-3-03-58-pmAmericans for the Arts envisions a country where everyone has access to—and takes part in—high quality and lifelong learning experiences in the arts, both in school and in the community. Their arts education council represents a cross section of the country so all voices are represented. The Americans for the Arts website has a plethora of resources on arts education. Check them out by CLICKING HERE.

MALI

MALI_V3_Color_100ppiThe Maine Arts Leadership Initiative provides plenty of resources at THIS LINK. Like all academic areas, students of the arts are successful because of teachers who are highly skilled, knowledgeable of developments in their fields, and motivated. MALI Teacher Leaders and Teaching Artists Leaders take on multiple leadership roles. If you’re interested in being part of a supportive collaborative group of visual and performing arts educators consider applying to be a Teacher Leader this Spring. If interested, or if you wish to learn more at this time please contact me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

 

ARTS ADVOCACY DAY

screen-shot-2017-02-23-at-9-06-48-pmWe know that arts-rich schools benefit everyone. It is our responsibility to help others who may not understand this statement. Arts Education month provides that opportunity and the Maine Alliance for Arts Education has plans for Arts Advocacy Day in Augusta at the State House on Wednesday, March 8. To learn more visit the MAAE site by CLICKING HERE.

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Update on National Core Arts Standards Theatre Standards

May 8, 2016

James Palmarini, Dir. of Educational Policy for the Educational Theatre Association
Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 11.09.54 AMThursday May 12, 2016 – Noon to 1:15 CENTRAL

WEBINAR INFORMATION

We first covered this topic back in January 2015. This webinar workshop will begin with an update on the nationwide state adoption/adaptation status of the theatre and other arts standards informed by the 2014 National Core Arts Standards. The presenter will then do short review of the purpose, structure, and web-based environment of the Core Standards, before moving into a detailed presentation on the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards’ (NCCAS) Model Cornerstone Assessment Pilot Project, a two-year initiative designed to identify standards-based student learning outcomes in the arts. The session will conclude with an overview of the relationship of the arts standards to the new federal education law, the Every Student Succeed Act. The session will also include periodic and concluding Q&A opportunities.

By attending this workshop, participants will be able to….

1. Find out where their state stands regarding the alignment of theatre and other arts standards to the National Core Standards.
2. Understand the structure and purpose of the new core standards and their applicability to in-school and after school theatre education programs taught by certified educators and/or teaching artists
3. Gain literacy around the web-based environment of the standards
4. Learn how the Model Cornerstone Assessments Pilot Project is helping to refine the NCCAS assessment model for measuring student learning that will help improvement achievement and validate the pedagogy of classroom educators and teaching artists.
5. Become literate in the basic opportunities for arts education that are embedded in the “well-rounded” education language of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

REGISTRATION

Click: TYA/USA MEMBERS – FREE
Click: NON TYA/USA MEMBERS – $20.00

For nonmembers: after payment, you will be redirected to the webinar registration page. If you are not redirected, CONTACT US, and we will send you the registration link.

For all: We will confirm your membership status and approve your registration, or contact you with any questions. Upon approval, you will receive instructions on how to log-on to the webinar.

Unsure of your membership status? Please CONTACT US. To join or renew, visit our MEMBERSHIP page.

CLICK HERE for further information on our Professional Development Webinars and to suggest topics and guests for future events.

GUEST
Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 11.28.24 AMJames Palmarini is the Director of Educational Policy for the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA), and was the founding editor of Teaching Theatre, the association’s journal for theatre educators. James serves on the Arts Education Partnership (AEP) Advisory Board; the Washington D.C.-based Arts Education Working Group; the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Leadership committee, and the board for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

In 1994 he was an editor for the theatre section of the National Standards for Arts Education. He served as a lead facilitator for the theatre writing team for the 2014 National Core Theatre Standards. During the past four years, James has presented and co-presented several workshops and webinars on the new arts standards, including at an AEP Forum, the Kennedy Center, Americans for the Arts, Southeastern Theatre Conference, and the National Guild for Community Arts. In 2013, he served on two committees for AEP’s 2020 Action Agenda. Currently, he is leading the theatre team of fifteen high school educators who are part of the NCCAS Model Cornerstone Assessment Pilot Project focusing on secondary assessment. He tweets regularly at @edtadvocacy and blogs occasionally at http://schooltheatre.org/advocacy.

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Core Arts Theatre Standards

January 3, 2015

TYA/USA Professional Development
Screen Shot 2014-12-22 at 10.42.15 PMSpecial Guest James Palmarini, Director of Educational Policy for the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA)
Wednesday January 14, 2015 Noon to 1:15 CST

This session will present an introduction of the purpose, structure, web-based environment, and state adoption strategies of the new Core Theatre Standards. The presenter will offer an overview of the creation of the standards, the philosophy and framework elements behind it, a tour of the website, and future plans around standards-based professional development, instructional resources, and advocacy. The session will also include periodic and concluding Q&A opportunities.

By attending this workshop, participants will be able to….

1. Understand the structure and purpose of the new core standards and their applicability to in and after school theatre education programs taught by certified educators and/or teaching artists
2. Gain literacy around the web-based environment of the standards
3. Learn how the Model Cornerstone Assessments embedded in the standards can be used to create reliable standards-based measures of student learning in theatre
4. Discover what role they can play to support adoption in their state

REGISTER NOW (Visa/MC):
Click: TYA/USA MEMBERS – $5.75
Click: NON TYA/USA MEMBERS – $15.75

After payment, you will be redirected to the event registration page. If you are not redirected, email us, and we will send you the registration link.

Click here for further information on our Professional Development Webinars and to suggest topics and guests for future events.

Our Guest
Screen Shot 2014-12-22 at 10.40.06 PMJames Palmarini is the Director of Educational Policy for the Educational Theatre Association (EdTA), a member of the Leadership Team for the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS), and executive editor of Teaching Theatre, the association’s journal for theatre educators that he co-founded in 1989. James was awarded EdTA’s Founders Award in 2005, and was recently inducted in the Ohio Educational Theatre Association Hall of Fame.

James has written extensively about arts education, including articles on methodology, standards, assessment, and a wide range of theatre-specific subjects. In 2013, he interviewed assessment expert Jay McTighe in for Teaching Theatre, and wrote articles focusing on the rise of Career and Technical Education (CTE) in theatre education and the new wave of teacher evaluation models and their impact on arts educators. Most recently, he wrote an overview of teacher evaluation strategies for the journal.

As EdTA Director of Educational Policy, James serves on the Arts Education Partnership Advisory Committee; the Washington D.C.-based Arts Education Working Group; and the board of the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education. He has led or participated in presentations addressing the new National Core Arts Standards at conferences sponsored by Americans for the Arts; the Kennedy Center; the Arts Education Partnership; and the National Guild for Community Arts Education, among others. He tweets regularly at @edtadvocacy and blogs occasionally at http://schooltheatre.org/advocacy.
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Theatre Festival

December 10, 2013

300 high school students engaged in learning

IMG_3771Every so often I have an opportunity to spend time with students. Last week I was with 300 high school students – the reason? To attend the Northeast Educational Theatre Festival that was held at the University of Southern Maine, Gorham campus. Rick Osann, arts educator from Bonny Eagle High School invited me to attend the event and I am so grateful that he did. What an experience!

I watched as the regional thespian officers formally opened the event with a skit and proceed to provide information in a collaborative manner, utilizing their stage skills throughout. Students were easily split into groups with each leader facilitating 20-minute ice breaker activities with about 25 students each. As time passed the energy in the room rose and the activities did exactly what they were planned to do – engage students in a manner that provided them to get to know each other. I wish other teachers had a chance to observe since it was such a learning opportunity for me as well.

IMG_3740The two-day event has several purposes: to provide opportunities for students to meet others from around New England, networking to learn from others, to provide feedback to students, and to attend valuable workshops on a variety of topics. Some of the topics include: Leadership, Directing, Clowning, Film Auditioning, Medieval Comic Theatre and Masks.

Students returned to the bleachers for the continuation of the program to hear from a couple of the adults. I said a few words that included information that my younger son had shared with me about what he learned from participating in theatre programs growing up.

IMG_3746Following me was a wonderful presentation given by Matt Conover from the Walt Disney Company. His key points: inspiration, finding one’s spark, and leadership resonated with me. Mr. Conover traced his own history mentioning inspirational people who had (and do) provided guidance and trusted him to take on leadership roles. They also nurtured him to follow his dreams. In college he earned a degree in lighting design and gave back to his own high school. He started in at the ground floor at Disney and 17 jobs, 25 years later he continues to love the work he does.

I was sad to leave and not be able to participate in the many workshops being offered over the next day and one half. Along with workshops, I am certain the students realized how fortunate they were for the opportunity. I know I was appreciative! The morning was a reminder of why I do what I do! Congrats to the student leadership team and the adults who worked so many hours to plan and implement an event of this magnitude.

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