Posts Tagged ‘Harlow Gallery’

h1

Call for Artists

April 24, 2014

Inspired by Katahdin at the Harlow Gallery in November

Hallowell, Maine — The Harlow Gallery invites Maine artists to submit work to the upcoming exhibition Inspired by Katahdin to be presented in partnership with brothers David & Carl Little in November 2014.

Artist and author David Little has long been inspired by Maine’s tallest mountain, so much so that he wrote a book,  Art of Katahdin: The Mountain, the Range, the Region published by Down East Books in 2013. The book follows a historic timeline using art inspired by the majestic mountain, as well as a collection of Katahdin literature, photography, graphics, maps and more, and was edited by Carl Little.

Cover image of book Art+of+Katahdin - Copy

This November, the Harlow Gallery will exhibit a selection of works by artists featured in the book, and are inviting submissions from Maine artists inspired by the majestic Maine mountain.  Submissions are being accepted via email through October 1, 2014 and will be reviewed by a curatorial committee including Art of Katahdin author and artist David Little, author and editor Carl Little, and staff from the Harlow Gallery.

The exhibition will be on view at the Harlow Gallery at 160 Water Street in Hallowell, Maine November 7-29, 2014. The  public reception on Friday, November 7, 5-8pm will featuring a book signing with David & Carl Little.

Info for Artists
1. Deadline for email submissions is 11 p.m. on Wednesday, October 1, 2014.

2. Original fine art in any media is welcome, including hand-pulled prints, photography, sculpture, and fine crafts, including ceramics, glass, and fiber art.

3. Artists should be residents of Maine at least part of the year or otherwise have a strong connection to our state.  Artists submitting from out of state are responsible for the costs of shipping work to and from the Harlow. Please note that return shipping will be actual cost plus $20 to cover staff time.

4. The entry fee is $10 for members of the Harlow Gallery/ Kennebec Valley Art Association or $20 for non-members. Non-members may join the Harlow Gallery when submitting and pay the member rate. Each artist may submit up to 4 works of art for consideration (please note that the fee is per artist, not per work of art).

For complete information about submitting your work, and to learn about more opportunities for artists in 2014, please visit the Harlow Gallery online at http://www.harlowgallery.org.

For more information:  Nancy Barron or Deb Fahy at 207-622-3813, kvaa@harlowgallery.org, http://www.harlowgallery.org

Image: The cover of Art of Katahdin: The Mountain, the Range, the Region by David Little, edited by Carl Little. Courtesy of Down East Books.

Deadline for Electronic Submissions:  October 1, 2014 at 11pm

Exhibition dates:  November 7 – 29, 2014

Opening reception & book signing: Friday, November 7, 5-8pm
Gallery Hours:  Wednesdays – Saturdays noon to 6pm
Location:  160 Water Street, Hallowell, Maine 04347

h1

Community Supported Arts Project

April 19, 2014

A collaborate project and much more

Susan Bickford is an adjunct professor at the UMA. Recently she did a most interesting collaborate project that challenged students in a unique way. You’ll learn about the project in this post along with Susan’s story.

Susan’s most recent project

1560699_479914208779321_552558491_nThe Collaborative Portrait Project began in my 2-D classroom four years ago. I wanted to develop a project that required a group effort, like the experiential education games that we played on Cow Island at Ripple Effect. I wanted to translate that group leadership dynamic to art making. At the same time I had to deliver the value studies lesson. I was also mandated to work both digitally and manually. So in this project I begin by asking the students to research and nominate a hero, “give me three good reasons why I should vote for your candidate”. At first they suggested movie stars and pop idols, like Micheal Jackson, Hugh Jackman, and they were all male. I hinted that they could go deeper and choose people that were more meaningful to them, more relevant of the present time, and more deserving of an epic portrait. Now we are getting nominations like Malala Youzefsai, Amelia Earhardt, Edward Snowden and the Dalai Lama. Each time I do the project I figure out a better way to do a certain aspect of it. The students give me suggestions.

1495476_480294335407975_371321812_nThe most recent iteration of the Collaborative Portrait Project is the Farmers Edition. Over the course of making a video documentary of a growing season on the Goranson Farm, farmers in general had become my heroes. In this case I nominated the farmers that I had worked with in the CSA: Community Supported Arts Project with the Harlow Gallery. Ten of the farmers that participated in that project agreed to be subjects for the portraits. I solicited Allison McKeen to take photographic portraits of the farmers, applied a coded matrix and digital filters. Now all I needed was a group to help me make the 360 panels. Deb Fahy who helped to find funding for the project connected me with the education committee at the Harlow Gallery through which 10 teachers committed to doing the project with their classrooms. I taught the teachers the methods at workshops and distributed the panels. Our first meeting was in April, the students made the panels during the Fall semester and we showed the portraits at the UMA Danforth Gallery in January. We even got materials donated by local businesses: Artist and Craftsman Supply and A.C. Moore. Ten four foot portraits of farmers from Maine, made collaboratively by 10 teachers and their 250 students. Each panel is lovely, it is amazing how they all fit together. You can see them now on the website at www.collaborativeportraitproject.com. Epic Portraiture throughout most of history has been reserved for monarchs, religious leaders, and the very rich. Images of the few, commissioned by the few, made by a master. They reveal the dominant paradigm of their time. Andy Warhol utilizing mechanical reproduction shifted the subjects of portraits to include ordinary people and cinematic moments. Chuck Close magnified virtuosity and mastered imperfection as beauty. In contrast, making portraits in collaboration, redefines how we see ourselves as a group. This is a radically different model, many with many, not icons but locals, not virtuosity but inclusiveness. My colleague Robert Rainey designed a gorgeous documentary book of our process with a DIY section which you can view and purchase on blurb.

participantsCPPF

What are your next steps with the collaborative project?

Thank you so much for asking me that question, you might think that after doing this project with 360 moving pieces and so many people that I would be exhausted but there is something about the group dynamic that is energizing me. You have to follow your flow, so I want to do this nationally. “100 heroes” is what I am calling the next iteration for this system of collaborative portraiture. I want to work with teachers across the country, teach them the project, have each group nominate a local hero and feed it into the system. We will all learn about what amazing things local people are doing all around the country. One thing I learned from the Farmers Edition was that the kids really enjoyed being part of a larger group. It inspired them to work really hard on their panels. To belong to this larger group was expansive and empowering. Another thing that confirmed to me by Carolyn Brown from Camden Hills Regional High School was that the digital filters assisted the students in their manual reproduction. The abstract nature actually facilitated the value study because it reduced the preconception of content. I want to highlight both of these discoveries in the national project. I am developing an online interface so that all of the portraits will be remotely uploaded to the internet, and the participants will be able to pick their panels much like you would pick an airplane seat. Then apply the filters, print them out and manually and reproduce them. Finally they will send them all, carefully coded, snail mail in a packet to the exhibition site. The collection of portraits serves to empower through involvement, and make visible an index of hope for the future. Can you imagine all these newly elected heroes, portraits traveling in pieces across the country toward their exhibition to be put back together like ambassadors of hope? It gives me chills.

What is your background?

As an artist I have always pieced my living together with lots of part time work. I grew up here in Maine, in Yarmouth. My fathers side of the family goes back seven generations in the Lisbon Falls area. When I graduated from college I worked doing environmental graphics in DC for a short time. But I soon moved back to Maine and started my own business making fine craft jewelry. I had big clients like Barneys and Nordstrom as well as many small galleries. I did wholesale trade shows for 15 years, as well as taught ceramics and metal smithing at North Yarmouth Academy and continuing education venues. Then I had my daughter Bella, which changed everything because I wanted to be with her all the time. When she was three, I started the MFA program at Maine College of Art (MECA) which really re-invigorated my art practice. My mom encouraged me to continue my studies. I studied at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in the early eighties, now it was the new millennium and so much had changed in those 15 years. In the Masters program at MECA I was required to read and write, to think and articulate my thoughts. My artwork is systems of interactivity. Sometimes I make installation with projected video and sound that viewers can modify with their movements and voice. Other times I make projections for theater. I was the artist in residence at Ripple Effect on Cow Island for several summers, living in a tent, being a video instructor, making rings and environmental sculpture. Nature is a very important element in my work. Since 2003 I have been teaching at the college level within the University of Maine system, Augusta, Farmington, USM, and Orono and more recently at MECA. I teach 2-D, 3-D, Electronic Art and various seminars.

How did you get interested in art? 

I got my start in art because my Grandmother Vivian took me to art classes with her on Tuesday nights all through high school in the seventies. We drew with colored pencils, Mr. Matolchy and Lee Bean were my teachers, I wasn’t very good at drawing but I learned to see, make marks and the discipline of practice. Then my parents funded my undergraduate studies at RISD. I probably would not have gotten accepted if not for those classes. My Dad suggested I major in Industrial Design because it was applied, he was an engineer and liked that idea. It has served me well, I have a fond place in my heart for machines and manufacture, and well functioning, elegant objects. I like problem solving and design process. The jewelry that I made was modular and utilized all of that training. When I think about installation it is with a knowledge of three dimensional space and ability to build things.

What is your role at UMA?

Since 2003 I have been an adjunct faculty member at UMA. We have great art facilities there, for printmaking, sculpture, photography, painting, electronic art and ceramics. The faculty are really passionate about teaching and their media.  Most of our students are place bound and would not have the resources to travel to other locations to study so I feel we are providing a valuable service for Central Maine. In the twenty-first century everyone utilizes media so having some visual literacy is a skill employers are looking for.

For more information email sbickford@tidewater.net.

h1

Harlow Gallery on St. Patricks Day

March 9, 2014

Traditional Irish music returns to the Harlow Gallery for Third Annual St Patrick’s Day Concert

For more information:  Deb Fahy at 207-622-3813, kvaa@harlowgallery.org, http://www.harlowgallery.org

Date and time: St Patrick’s Day – Monday, March 17, 2014 6-7:30pm

Location:  The Harlow Gallery, 160 Water Street, Hallowell, Maine 04347

Cost: FREE and open to the public with donations accepted

Hallowell, Maine — All are welcome on St. Patrick’s Day, Monday, March 17th from 6-7:30 pm for an all ages Irish music performance at the Harlow Gallery, at 160 Water Street in Hallowell.

K Irish Music

Musicians Adam Soosman and William Fahy performing at the Harlow Gallery in 2013. Photo by Andy Molloy courtesy of the Kennebec Journal

Local musicians Adam Soosman, William Fahy (with special guests?) will perform traditional Irish music with Irish tin whistles, Irish flute, recorder, and other woodwinds, to celebrate the holiday. The performance will also include select pieces from other European and American cultures and traditions. This is the third year that Fahy and Soosman have played this performance and it is becoming a tradition that is welcomed by the Hallowell community.

Adam Soosman has been performing since 1976, and in Maine since 1989. He has been teaching music in Maine since 1996. He is an instructor for the Musician’s 1st Choice School of Music & Performance in Augusta, specializing in Woodwind & Brass instruments and Voice. Soosman can be heard on the Sam Shain and the Scolded Dogs album playing various saxophones – the album was recorded in Hallowell, at Bob Caldwell’s studio. Soosman plays regularly with the popular function band, JONES’N, which is celebrating its twelfth anniversary this year. He also performs with the dynamic duo “A n’ D”, and the coastal Jazz ensemble “Best In Show”.

William Fahy is a freshman at Hall-Dale High School. He has been studying Irish tin whistle, flute and saxophone with Soosman for over three years at Musician’s First Choice School of Music.  William earned first flute in the Maine Music Educators Association District III High School Honors Festival, which took place at Cony High School in January.

h1

Harlow Student Exhibits

March 6, 2014

Harlow Gallery

Contact: Nancy Barron at the Harlow Gallery. 207-622-3813,
kvaa@harlowgallery.org, http://www.harlowgallery.org

Exhibition Dates: March 8-29, 2014

Opening reception: Saturday, March 8, 12-5pm

Hours: Wednesday – Saturday noon to 6pm. Also by chance or by appointment (call 622-3813).

Free and open to the public
~~~~~~~
Young at Art: celebrating artists in grades K-8

"Ipcar Cat" mixed media by Kristin of Windsor Elementary School, submitted by her art teacher Genevieve Keller

“Ipcar Cat” mixed media by Kristin of Windsor Elementary School, submitted by her art teacher Genevieve Keller

The public is invited to Young at Art, our 11th annual exhibition of children’s artwork, when area students in grades K -8 have their work on display in the professional setting of the Harlow Gallery at 160 Water Street in Hallowell.  Each year the gallery invites art teachers from elementary and middle schools from throughout the greater Augusta area to select their best student art to be featured in this community-wide celebration of talented young artists. Schools serving the following communities are participating: Augusta, Chelsea, Farmingdale, Gardiner, Hallowell, Manchester, Readfield, Richmond, Monmouth, Palermo and Windsor.

The exhibition, on view March 8-29, 2014, is free and open to the public. Hours at the Harlow Gallery are Wednesday to Saturday, noon to 6pm.

The public is invited to the opening reception on Saturday, March 8 between 12-5pm. Light refreshments available.  Please join us in celebrating the youngest artists in our community — families with children especially encouraged to attend.  Artists and their families and friends are requested to attend according to the following schedule to avoid overcrowding:

12 – 2pm – artists in kindergarten, 1st & 2nd grade

2-4 pm – artists in 3rd, 4th & 5th grade

3-5 pm – artists in 6th, 7th & 8th grade

New this year! The Harlow Gallery’s annual showcase of high school artists, Higher Forms of Art  is being presented in partnership with the University of Maine at Augusta, in the spirit of connecting and celebrating art, artists and community.  The show will take place at the Gannett Building gallery at 331 Water Street in downtown Augusta from March 14 to April 5, 2014 with an opening reception on Friday, March 14 from 5-7pm. FMI – http://harlowgallery.org/higher-forms-of-art-at-umas-gannett-gallery/

Also new this year and in partnership with University of Maine at Augusta, the Harlow Gallery, working with  project organizer Russell Kahn of Camden Hills Regional High School, will present the first annual Maine Statewide High School Ceramic Arts Show in the Gannett building gallery at 331 Water Street in downtown Augusta April 9-26, 2014, with an reception the evening of  Wednesday April 9, 5-7pm.  FMI – http://harlowgallery.org/high-school-ceramic-arts-show/

Young at Art is being supported by Scrummy Afters Candy Shoppe and Augusta Schools PTAs.  All three student art shows have  been made possible generous support of our Season Sponsors:  The Bank of Maine, Capitol Dental Care, Dead River Co., Great Gatherings, the City of Hallowell,  Mr. Brooks Harlow, Jr., the Jennings Family, Kennebec Savings Bank and the Vallee Brothers.  Please thank  our sponsors for supporting the arts for all ages.

h1

Harlow Educators Meet

January 26, 2014

January 29

You are invited to join the next Harlow Educators Initiative meeting

4:00pm on Jan. 29th at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell

Screen shot 2014-01-24 at 12.16.20 PM
Highlights for the meeting include:

* Arts Educator Initiative (AEI) related exhibition opportunities (Nancy Barron)
* Statewide HS pottery show – UMA Gannett Gallery, Augusta (Russel Kahn)
* Kennebec Area Young at Art – Harlow (Nancy)
* Higher Forms of Art – UMA Gannett (Nancy)
* State of the Arts check in – State associations, Maine Arts Assessment
Initiative (Suzanne Goulet)
* Unit/Lesson/Idea sharing (please bring copies) – Volunteer at your comfort
* Feature – Maine Arts Assessment Teacher Leader, Jeff Orth “Controlling the Chaos:     The World of Student-Centered Education

(Feature description)   Ever wonder how to manage students working on
        different standards at the same time in the same class space? Learn about ways  to organize the chaos using tools to empower students to move at their own
        pace with standards and to meet deadlines to avoid falling behind.

This group was started through the Harlow Gallery to support area arts educators. It is a very unique partnership with a community art gallery – A great opportunity to connect with your colleagues. Consider inviting an educator from another discipline. Collaborative connections encouraged.

There are only 4 meetings a year and the agenda will follow what the participating educators propose, including sharing lesson plans.

Do you have an online gallery? Website? Blog? A consent form?…..Bring student work, publications, announcements…….

Please come, share and grow!

If you would like more information, please contact either Nancy Barron at the gallery: kvaa@harlowgallery.org  or Suzanne Goulet at: sgoulet@aos92.org.

Contact hours available and light refreshments will be served.

h1

8″x10″x100

December 5, 2012

Harlow Gallery

While walking to my car after a meeting last Friday evening in Hallowell I was glad to see that the Harlow Gallery was open. I walked into the warm space that was alive with small artwork and the many people in attendance were buzzing with conversation. I was greeted at the door by Lisa Wheeler who kindly agreed to write a blog post on the event. The exhibit goes through December 8th. In Lisa’s words…

HarlowLast Friday night I had the opportunity to volunteer at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell at the opening of “8x10x100″, an amazing art show and sale that benefits programming at the gallery. Actually, I helped hang the show earlier in the week and got a sneak peak at literally a couple hundred pieces of 8″ x 10″ artwork: drawings on paper, prints, paintings, photographs, shadow boxes, clay, wire, and mixed media pieces. Some were framed, some were mounted, all were original. I made a mental note of the pieces I wanted to buy for myself–so many to choose from–and imagined having to get them quickly before someone else did!

Back to the opening: Even before the show’s official 5 p.m. start, patrons were knocking at the Harlow’s front door. They signed up for a number and started looking at the grid of art lining the walls. As more people came in I was impressed with the time and thoughtfulness with which they viewed the work. Some were looking for just the right piece to speak to them. Some were looking for work by a specific artist. Some were just there for the company and yummy goodies. But all were there, collectively enjoying art, thinking about art, and talking about art. The excitement could be felt in the room as yellow “I want that one” stickers appeared on the wall labels under a piece, and grew even more as a red “Sold” sticker replaced it. There was even a cheerfully contested sale over the first piece sold–did it belong to the patron who had been waiting for 5 o’clock to strike, or the one who swooped in at 4:59 and went right to the piece, slapping on his yellow sticker? The gentlemen worked it out for themselves and in doing so, it worked out for the Harlow and the artist. Fifty percent of the $100 price tag goes to each. You can have that win-win-win experience, too. The 8x10x100 show is up through Saturday, December 8. This week, you will most likely be viewing the art in a quieter setting. And sorry, no goodies. But you can thoughtfully look, choose the piece or pieces that speak to you, and support the Harlow and their programming, as well as a local artist, with your purchase. You’ll own some original art, perhaps give it as a gift, and get to feel good about supporting the arts.

h1

Community Supporting Agriculture/Arts

October 28, 2012

Harlow Gallery, Hallowell

This past week I was invited to the Harlow Gallery to join a focus group they were having on Education and Programming that will provide information for their upcoming strategic planning meeting. I was glad to be part of a conversation with several community people who have varying connections with the Harlow Gallery. In many ways the Harlow is a model gallery for playing an important role in the Hallowell community.

I was especially happy to be meeting in the gallery with art all around and more so because of the unique exhibit they were having called Community Supporting Agriculture/Arts or CSA. Some of you might be familiar with CSAs. When my sons were younger we belonged to a CSA near our home. We paid in the spring for a share of food and each week during the summer we’d stop at the farm and pick up a surprise box filled with vegetables. The focus of the Arts connection is very exciting. It is easy for me to think of potential ideas on how to create something similar with students.

Retired Cony High School art teacher Christine Higgins is one of the artists who participated in the project along with one of my former students Erskine Academy art teacher Scott Minzy. Last weeks Maine Sunday Telegram had an outstanding article written by Bob Keyes on the project. I emailed Christine and she agreed to provide a description on the project and include her experience at Annabesacook Farm located in Winthrop.

In March of 2012, I was one of 14 artists chosen to participate in a CSA – Community Supporting Agriculture/Arts project sponsored through the Harlow Art Gallery in Hallowell, Maine. Each artist was paired with a CSA farm. We visited our farms throughout the next 8 months with the goal of creating art from those experiences. Our discoveries and stories about the farms are reflected in the various Maine exhibits at different venues through February.

sketch of soil map

My focus was on fibers, papermaking, and prints. My initial proposal was to abstractly ‘map’ the land. Through conversation with Craig Hickman, one of the farm owners, I learned specifics about raising animals, crop cultivation, and an attitude about farming that integrates responsibility of the land with the community. I soon discovered that my ‘farm’ was also a bed and breakfast, catering service, site for weddings, and other events. My ‘farmer’ was an author, poet, performing artist, philanthropist, Rotarian, and is currently running for the legislature to represent Winthrop and Readfield.

making paper in the vat

Gathering fibers from the farm, I made paper with cattails, cornstalks, garlic stems, meadow grasses, collard greens, and clay as pigment. Land and our attitudes about the earth was my primary subject.  I collected essays in response to my question, “What do you think of when you hear the word, land?”, and incorporated these on handmade paper maps, which were inserted into cattail baskets, that the audience may take out, touch, read, and reflect on their own relationship to the earth.

paper relief map with pulp painting

As I became more familiar with Annabesacook Farm, the geography, dwellings and residents influenced other themes in my work.  These farm ‘stories’ were printed on my handmade paper. 

I found that the parallels between artist and farmer are considerable: we both work many hours in satisfying, timeless, and seasonal work. Both artist and farmer are self-directed individuals, who, when not actually present in the studio or field, are thinking about their work. The endeavor becomes the fiber of the being.  

A CSA is collaboration with an audience, much as an artist’s exhibit depends on the support of its viewers. Both thrive on the excitement and satisfaction of successful production that involves a life-long, heart and soul commitment. Artist and farmer pursue a balanced life of seclusion, reflection, and production that welcomes an audience of community partnership. We both have a driving desire to care for, transform, mold, process, and shape through drudgery, sweat, stress, problem-solving, and creative, independent thinking. Both activities are risky with an unpredictable element. Craig once said to me, “Farming is not romantic – it will make you sore.”

Cattail maps

I hope that the art created because of this project increases awareness of the vital importance of the resources provided by the earth and appreciation for those who cultivate that delicate balance of farming and giving back to the land.

The concept for this project originated with Deb Fahy, Director of Harlow Gallery, and was supported by a tireless team of staff and volunteers. A manual for communities interested in a similar idea of pairing farms and artists will soon be available through the Harlow.  More information can be found at www.harlowgallery.org, including photos and blogs of the activities.

Chris and Craig at the Harlow opening

The Harlow Gallery exhibit closed yesterday, October 27th but there are many other locations that you can see the exhibit during the next 4 months.

  • Common Street Arts, Waterville  Nov. 3 – 30th 
  • Sheepscot General Store, Whitefield  Nov. 9 – Dec. 1st
  • Savory Maine Dining, Damariscotta  Nov. 13 – Feb. 5
  • Maine Farmland Trust Gallery, Belfast  Jan. 4th – Feb. 27
  • Art Gallery at Frontier, Brunswick  Jan. 11 – Feb. 24th

Thank you to Chris for providing this description and her part in the project.!

h1

Harlow Gallery: Hallowell

March 19, 2012

Harlow Gallery working with visual art educators

Nancy Barron, Program Director at the Harlow Gallery in Hallowell has helped to create a connection with local visual art educators to form a group called Art Educators’ Initiative. Recently Nancy answered questions for meartsed readers. Since this is a great model for other communities please share this post with your local galleries so they can think of possibilities for communities throughout Maine.

Mission Statement: “The Harlow Education Committee mission is to promote the arts through educational partnerships with the community.”

Vision Statement: “The goal of the Harlow Education Committee is to foster creativity by supporting programs and activities that encourage public awareness of, participation in, and appreciation of the arts.”

Tell me about the purpose of the Art Educators’ Initiative group.

The purpose of the Art Educators’ Initiative group is to give art educators a network of peers to problem solve, generate ideas, share professional development opportunities-in short, a support system.

Sounds like a PLC (Professional Learning Community) to me. How and when did this idea form?

Website for classroom workshop, Shalimar Poulin instructing

The idea was an “ah-ha” moment at the Harlow. We have hosted Higher Forms of Art for several years; a show celebrating some of the area’s high school students art work. It is unique because the students not only display their work, but select the work for the show (curate), hang and promote the show. A hands on experience in a real gallery. We always want to engage this high school demographic and brain stormed about how to do just that. We decided to have a young artists celebratory pizza party. We had a sponsor who provided the pizza and requested that the teachers invite up to 6 students and to attend themselves. (60 students were invited). Disappointedly only 3 students came to the party, however; nearly all of their instructors came. With art from these various schools on the walls, introductions were made and the event instantly morphed into a very upbeat networking session for the instructors. The teachers were inspired by their colleague’s lessons and curious about their techniques. Needless to say, the event, though not for reasons intended, was a complete success. I floated the idea to host an “Art Teachers Retreat” to our relatively new, but very eager Art Education committee. They, (some of whom are retired art educators) loved the idea. In May of 2011 we held a focus group compiled of about 15 area art educators, Art Ed committee members and the Harlow staff. We asked the group:

  • Is there interest in having such a group
  • If so, what they would like to explore
  • How often they would like to meet
  • Would they be interested in a blog to communicate between meetings

They liked the idea, were realistic about what kind of commitment they could make (4 times per year), and they came up with a list of focus items which included: website development, clay workshops, behavior in the classroom, and more.

What does your work include?

So far, nearly a year later, the group has met for a website for classroom workshop taught by Art teacher Shalimar Poulin-10 educators signed up for this workshop in August of 2011. We have had two meetings since in which a good chunk of time was spent talking about assessments. This piece was a real eye opener for me. This one topic is clearly something nearly every teacher seems to struggle with. Teachers were also encouraged to bring examples of “tried and true” lessons.

Tell me about the teachers who are participating. 

Website for classroom workshop

The group varies from meeting to meeting with between 9 and 12 teachers attending. Our list has grown from 20 to over 30 teachers now.  Many of the teachers on our list have participated in our yearly Young at Art month in March. But we are not limiting the group to school aged children. We have an adult ed instructor and two instructors of adults with mental illness. Instructors are finding us through email blasts to statewide groups. The areas represented are:  Bath (adult ed instructor),Wiscassett, Richmond, Gardiner (and all the schools they serve-Randolf, Pittston, Chelsea), Chelsea, Hallowell, Augusta, Manchester, Readfield, Winthrop, Monmouth, Wayne (Kent’s Hill), and Waterville.

What activities, forums, and/or gatherings have you provided for the teachers?

So far, we have done one off site workshop at Capitol Area Computers and three meetings at the Harlow. We provide snacks… a small gesture with a large impact.

What is your philosophy around the idea of connecting the Harlow Gallery with art teachers? Value to the community, teachers, students, and others?

Chantel Wellman, "Blue Rock' Gouche on Paper Cony High School, from this years Higher Forms of Art show at the Harlow Gallery

The philosophy behind the group is: Art teachers are a somewhat under supported group. Every year facing budget cuts-one of our instructors jobs was cut in half last year!  They are very often the only art teacher in their schools-there are not “teams” for them to bounce ideas off from. The Art Educators’ Initiative Group was meant to provide support-for teachers from teachers.

The value to the community will be teachers that, even with the unique challenges they face, will continue to provide the best arts education to students.

The value to teachers will be a support network, for example someone to call during the struggles of trying to understand how to assess a student that doesn’t fit the criteria for a passing grade in art. Professional development: something so important, to keep current with new trends in art education. The importance of this group for students will be art teachers that are fresh and focused.

What do your future plans include for the Art Educators’ Initiative group?

We are currently writing a grant to help support this group both by providing funds for a laptop and LCD for educators to present to one another, and for a series of clay summer workshops. This was one of the original requests from the focus group.

A great big THANK YOU to Nancy for taking the time to answer these questions. If you have others please post them below in the comment section of the blog post or email Nancy Barron directly at kvaa@harlowgallery.org.

h1

Youth Art Month Exhibits

March 14, 2012

From Portland to Hallowell to Bangor to Presque Isle

Celebrating Youth Art Month with student art exhibits throughout the state.

Art in the Heart student exhibit, Bangor Mall

Bangor Mall – Art in the Heart student exhibit. Fifty five art teachers have contributed about 800 pieces of student artwork and came together on a recent Sunday to set up the exhibit. The artwork will be in place until March 17th.

Kal Elmore’s description: “Teachers had selected work, matted work, made lists of students, etc. Calls had been made to arrange mall space, panel moving, etc. The day had arrived. It was time for all the parts to come together. And, yes, it was a Sunday morning.

The panels arrived. People started to set up their exhibits. Art teachers greeted old friends with hugs and news. “Oohs” and “aahs” could be heard as art teachers found pieces that are appealing. It truly was glorious to see this exhibit come together!”                                              

The state Youth Art Month exhibit is at the Portland Museum of Art until the end of the month. The exhibit is sponsored by Maine Art Education Association (MAEA). The official opening was on Saturday, March 10th with hundreds of people there to celebrate the 131 students from grades K-12. It was marvelous! Carol Trimble received the Arts Advocacy Award from MAEA and Linda Stanley, MAEAs selection for the Art Teacher of the Year; both had wonderful messages for parents, teachers, and most importantly the students! The show remains until the end of March.

Camilla Jones, "Me on My Worst Day" Tempera, Hall-Dale High School

The Harlow Gallery in Hallowell annual student exhibits are top notch. The high school exhibit was on display during the first part of the month and presently on display is the elementary student art work. The high schools represented each send one student to actually hang the show. They did a marvelous job on the collaboration.

The Northern pARTners – art teachers from Aroostook county, came together last week to hang their student art show at the Aroostook Centre Mall. The art teachers traveled from Houlton, Easton, Caribou, Hodgdon, St. Agatha, Washburn, Mars Hills, Connor, Fort Fairfield, Limestone, Ashland, and of course Presque Isle. The show has 346 pieces from 12 towns. Hundreds of parents and students attended the opening and there were smiles and smiles to go around.

Madasyn Shorey, Grade 3, Zippel Elementary School, Ruth McAtee art teacher

Aroostook county art teachers at the opening of the exhibit.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 904 other followers

%d bloggers like this: