Posts Tagged ‘Library of Congress’

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Teacher2Teacher

May 23, 2021

Black History Resources

Teacher2Teacher gathered resources for teachers on Black History. Below are some of those resources on relevant topics for today’s teachers. These were originally provided during Black History month but educators understand that this topic should not be limited to one part of the year only. I recommend that you have some time before clicking on the links below. You’ll be sure find plenty of ideas that will lead you to more ideas.

EDUTOPIA

  • Arts Education and African American history, a collection of resources from the Kennedy Center ArtsEdge. ArtsEdge has reorganized their digital resources and I’m sure you’ll find their data base filled with resources you can use on the topic and beyond.
  • Resources from Smithsonian Education Black History feature various collections, from “The Blues and Langston Hughes” to “Harlem Renaissance: A Reading List.” It’s a great place to let your students explore primary sources, and there is something for students of all ages.
  • The Library of Congress has lesson plans for teachers and primary sources for students to explore, including artwork, baseball cards, political cartoons, and photographs. Also be sure to check out the Library’s civil rights-themed collection.
  • PBS includes an article about the documentary film titled More Than a Month about why Black History Month should not only be one month – the coldest and shortest month of the year. The young filmmakers cross country story focuses on the four components: education, history, identity, and commercialism.
  • Scholastic provides useful resources for arts educators on African American Heritage. Arts and culture resources including the History of Jazz with Wynton Marsalis.
  • National Education Association: Integrating African-American Culture & History into Your Curriculum. Resources on and about poets including The Poet’s Voice: Langston Hughes and You.

Find more in this Edutopia article written by Matt Davis.

In this ASCD article Historical Black Excellence Provides a Blueprint for Reimagining Education you’ll find Gholdy Muhammad’s review of the reality of the inequities in the education system for black and brown children. Gholdy has been studying the history of African American education and literacy development in the U.S. from the 19th century forward. The article provides a deep look at the facts from the past that frame the what and why of today’s curriculum.

UnboundEd provides a anti-racist tool kit – a set of resources to help school communities disrupt inequity by inspiring reflections, conversations, and actions on issues of race, racism, and bias. There are several resources within the .pdf toolkit that are downloadable.

A valuable article called The Do’s and Don’ts of Teaching Black History from Learning for Justice. I find that the Learning for Justice website is very valuable to support teaching and learning.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, Washington, D.C. Sergii Figurnyi – stock.adobe.com
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Soldier’s Sketchbooks

December 7, 2019

Documenting History

At age 21-year Victor Lundy dropped out of architecture school and became an infantry soldier in World War II.  He didn’t give up on his creative side and actually made documentary sketches using pencil of where he was and what he saw. He struggled to listen to lectures and was busy instead of sketching in 8 pocket-sized notebooks. His collection was donated by Lundy, at the age of 92 to the Library of Congress. They’ve all been scanned and are available online at THIS LINK.

This taken from the article: “The vivid images show everything from air raids to craps games for cigarettes. A sense of longing for home is a recurring theme in his sketches, which include detailed drawings of his bunk as well as particularly dream-like drawing, titled Home Sweet Home, that shows a soldier lounging on a hammock.In we have a breathtaking visual record of World War II, in the form of documentary sketches. For Lundy, “drawing is sort of synonymous with thinking,” which means we are left with an intimate archive of sketches that unfold one soldier’s experience fighting on the front lines.”

Learn more in THIS ARTICLE written by Jessica Stewart on November 14, 2016.

Lundy went on and became a very successful architect. Read about his career on WikipediaAs far as I can tell he is still alive.

 

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