Posts Tagged ‘Lisa Gilman’

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Snowshoe Art

March 10, 2019

Winthrop Middle School

Thank you to Winthrop Middle School visual art educator Lisa Gilman for providing the following information for this blog post. 

For the second year in a row Winthrop Middle School students worked with snow shoe artist, Jason Cote. Trying to find the words is not easy to describe the experience my students and I had. Working with a local community organization, Winthrop Plays Outside, we were able to be the first to commission Jason as an artist last year.

The day after a snow storm Jason arrived at school at sunrise and sketched the design in snow. He laid down the initial circles and paths for students to follow with ropes and poles. We kept the groups small, we had 12 pairs of snow shoes from local library, Bailey Public Library. Students were given directions to follow the path and follow Jason’s directions. Students could watch if they did not want to participate. For many students this was the first time on snow shoes. However, when the first drone pictures came out, more students wanted to participate. Almost two hundred 6th, 7th and 8th grade kids created the work of art with Jason.

Watching from the sidelines, directing students, helping get snow shoes on and off, I was nervous. The kids were incredibly well behaved but from my view it looked like fun chaos, but chaos never the less!! Then my tech guy took a few drone pictures and the magic began to appear. (Jason hires a professional drone photographer to take the final photographs and video.) The pictures were amazing. The artwork was clear, the middle school staff and I were all in pure awe. Students expressed their gratitude for several days.

Lisa Gilman,Jason Cote

It’s hard express how grateful I am for this experience. The art was temporary, but the memories will last forever. When I got home and had time to reflect I thought of Christo and Jean- Claude. Their work is tough for many to understand; it’s temporary, environmental, conceptual. Whatever you want to call it, art work, art happening, snow shoe art, I as an artist got to feel like Christo and Jean-Claude for the day. The experience transcended all expectations.

Jason Cote is great with the students and a creative artist. He does do snow shoe art commission work and can be reached through social media or contact me, Lisa Gilman at lgilman12@gmail.com and I can pass the information along.

 

 

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Snow Shoe Art

March 23, 2018

Got snow?

Lisa and some of her students

Art has always been a passion for me. Art is magical, ephemeral and life changing. But those reading this who are arts educators, you already know that. Trying to find the words is not easy to describe the experience my students and I had with snow shoe artist, Jason Cote. The whole experience was serendipitous. Teaching art for 20 years, I was thinking of new ways to engage my students. Looking to breathe new life into my lessons I started to see more and more about snow shoe art. Then as the universe would have it Jason Cote was interviewed by Bill Green’s Maine. He was close to my school! I contacted him through social media and he immediately responded and wanted to work with my students.

Working with a local community organization, Winthrop Plays Outside, run by Margy Burns-Knight, we were able to be the first to commission Jason as an artist. Jason Cote came to the middle school in February for a half an hour assembly. Students were shown his work and were able to ask him questions. Now we had to wait for the snow….

March delivered great snow. We got 12 inches of fresh snow on March 8 and 9 and the magic happened. Jason arrived at school at sunrise and sketched the design in snow. He laid down the initial circles and paths for students to follow. We kept the groups small, we had 12 pairs of snow shoes. Students were given directions to follow the path and follow Jason’s directions. Students could watch if they did not want to participate. For many students this was the first time on snow shoes. However, when the first drone pictures came out, more students wanted to participate. About 150 students in grades 6, 7 and 8 created the work of art with Jason.

Watching from the sidelines, directing students, helping get snow shoes on and off, I was nervous. The kids were incredibly well behaved but from my view it looked like fun chaos, but chaos never the less!! Then the school’s tech teacher took a few drone pictures and the magic began to appear. Jason hires a professional drone photographer to take the final photographs and video. The pictures were amazing. The artwork was clear, the middle school staff and I were all in pure awe. Students have expressed their gratitude for several days.

It’s hard express how grateful I am for this experience. The art was temporary, but the memories will last forever. When I got home and had time to reflect I thought of Christo and Jean-Claude. Their work is tough for many to understand; it’s temporary, environmental, conceptual. Whatever you want to call it, art work, art happening, snow shoe art, I as an artist got to feel like Christo and Jean-Claude for the day. The experience transcended all expectations.

WATCH THE VIDEO to get a full sense of this project. The still photo doesn’t tell the story well. It is HUGE! To learn more watch the Bill Green’s Maine segment with Jason Cote. Amazing! And, an article from the Portland paper, March 2017, on Jason’s work. Thank you to art educator from Winthrop schools, Lisa Gilman for providing this blog post!

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Cross Discipline Literacy Network

October 10, 2013

Online and face to face opportunities

Pam Ouellette (Lisbon High School), Suzanne Goulet (Waterville Sr. High School) and Lisa Gilman (Winthrop Middle School) continue to be a part of presenting collaborative professional development regarding literacy.

Screen shot 2013-10-09 at 10.27.21 PMVocabulary Instruction – grades 6-12 (Lisa G.)

Webinar 1: December 9, 3:00 – 4:00pm

Big and Practical Ideas About Academic Vocabulary in the Classroom

Description: How do we motivate students to see new meaning in words? When they learn the word “composition” in art, can they then transfer it to a social studies term when speaking about the composition of a community? What does it mean to write a musical composition, and how does that differ from composing an essay… or how are they the same? This webinar will provide an overview of ideas about how a teacher can go about selecting and assessing student vocabulary through five big ideas: Intentionality, Transparency, Usability, Personalization and Prioritization. The first webinar will highlight ideas on how to make vocabulary instruction intentional and transparent and offer strategies that can be used immediately in your own classrooms. Be ready to share your ideas, too.

Webinar 2: January 13, 4:30 – 5:30pm

More Practical Ideas about Academic Vocabulary in the Classroom

Description: This webinar will review the five big ideas of vocabulary instruction and delve into strategies for making vocabulary instruction usable, personal and a priority. Suggestions for implementation will be presented by three teachers of different subject areas and grade levels. Cross-curricular as well as subject-specific vocabulary strategies, will be explored. The teachers will share their experiences with concrete examples from their own classrooms. Again, be ready to share your ideas and experiences, too.

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Archived Webinars: CDLN

May 31, 2013

Wrapped up with a bow!

A GREAT BIG THANK YOU TO:

Jen Nash, K-8 music educator, Etna-Dixmont, RSU 19

Lisa Gilman, 7-12 art educator, Winthrop Middle and High School, AOS 97

Suzanne Goulet, art educator, Waterville Senior High School

The three visual and performing arts educators hosted 4 webinars during the 2012-14 school year for the Cross Discipline Literacy Network. They did a fabulous job planning and facilitating the webinars that illustrated the connections between the arts and literacy from multiple angles and integration methods.

They invited guests to participate as well so there was a wealth of information shared on each webinar from people with tons of knowledge. Guests included: Catherine Ring, Jude Valentine, Katrina Billings, Pam Ouellette, Karen Montanaro, and Jake Sturtevant.

Fortunately the webinars are archived so you can access them alone or perhaps with your colleagues. It would be a great way to spend professional development time with colleagues in your building, district, or region. Each webinar provides a place to start a conversation and continue with work you might have underway with literacy, the Common Core ELA, integration, and much more.

The webinar are listed below along with the links where you can access them.

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Lisa Gilman

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Jen Nash

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Suzanne Goulet

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Cross Discipline Literacy Network

March 20, 2013

Webinar

We know Spring is coming and so is another wonderful opportunity to connect with other Arts educators in the third Cross Discipline Literacy Network webinar.  Even if you have not joined the conversation before please feel free to “drop in” and learn about what literacy in the Arts classroom is and can be.

Thursday, March 21st, 3 PM to 4PM
                                                       The “L” iteracy Word

The following is for connecting to the webinar:
To join the meeting:

1.    Go online to http://stateofmaine.adobeconnect.com/pk202112912/

2.    Select ‘Enter as a Guest’ and type your name in the corresponding field.

3.    To listen and speak during the meeting, you will need to be connected by telephone:

·         The meeting can call you at a phone number you provide at log-in, or

·         You can dial directly into the meeting: 1-877-455-0244, Passcode 8332185782.  (Use this second option when joining the meeting from sites where your phone can only be reached through a switchboard.)

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Arts and Literacy

January 22, 2013

How well do you play with others?

DanseThe second live webinar installment of the Arts component of the Cross Discipline Literacy Network (CDLN) is this Thursday from 3pm to 4pm.

“How to play with others” is an investigation in to using strategies and frameworks so that each content area is enhanced and strengthened in the learning environment.

There are many changes and adaptions afoot in the arts world and understanding the developments available to us will help to create relationships with our non-arts education colleagues that embrace and support the unique gifts that the arts bring us.

This is an invitation to join Jen Nash, Lisa Gilman, Suzanne Goulet and specials guests, Catherine Ring and Argy Nestor in these discussions.

Please consider sharing some of your successful integrations with us!

To join the meeting:
1.    Go online to http://stateofmaine.adobeconnect.com/pk202112912/

2.    Select ‘Enter as a Guest’ and type your name in the corresponding field.

3.    To listen and speak during the meeting, you will need to be connected by telephone:

·         The meeting can call you at a phone number you provide at log-in, or

·         You can dial directly into the meeting: 1-877-455-0244, Passcode 8332185782.  (Use this second option when joining the meeting from sites where your phone can only be reached through a switchboard.)

Thank you to webinar facilitator Suzanne Goulet for the blog post and for the Danse logo!

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Cross Discipline Literacy Network

September 28, 2012

Questions to Ponder

  • Are you looking for specific literacy activities and resources?
  • Do you use school wide tools and wonder how to adapt them?
  • Do you have a word wall?
  • Do you wonder about visual literacy and how your students are visual learners?

If you are interested in learning more, now is your chance to act by joining the Cross Discipline Literacy Network (CDLN). Registration is open until October 5th! Literacy tools and strategies can provide opportunities for students to go deeper in to their learning.

Consider this image taken from the Waterville High School principles and elements of design reference sheet.

Imagine this with the entire list of elements and principles. The list used in conjunction with a graphic organizer, you could implement/modify for students use and make available when reflecting or describing visual artworks.

An excellent and elegant example of a graphic organizer from the Smithsonian.
The CDLN is an excellent opportunity in adapting and modifying existing resources for your use to improve learning.

Does your school have a literacy mission and is not sure how to “make this work” in the arts?

Insist that you are part of your school initiative………This professional development may help you to take advantage of a great opportunity to show how valuable the arts are – perhaps even to lead.

Looking for professional development and an opportunity to get together and share strategies in a collaborative environment? The network is led by facilitators understanding that there is much to share and learn. Three of your colleagues will be facilitating the webinars representing the elementary level is Etna-Dixmont music educator Jen Nash, Winthrop Middle School visual art educator Lisa Gilman, and Waterville High School visual art educator Suzanne Goulet.

The cost is $25 for the year and provides you with multiple opportunities for webinars and face to face gatherings for discussing your experiences and discoveries in improving student learning. The webinars will also be archived. Information describing the CDLN, the face to face locations, and the webinar strands,  as well as the link to register for this opportunity can be found at: http://www.maine.gov/doe/literacy-for-me/cdln.html.

You can register by clicking here. UNTIL OCTOBER 5! For more information on the CDLN and the Literacy for ME initiative please click here.

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Literacy for ME

May 18, 2012

Maine’s Comprehensive State Literacy Plan

Lisa Gilman teaches visual arts at the Winthrop Middle School. During the last year she has served as a content specialist on the State Literacy Committee. Recently she wrote this post for the meartsed blog to provide information to arts educators of the work the committee has done.

The committee was formed during the Fall of 2010. The MDOE applied for a Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy (SRCL) formula grant to be used to establish a Statewide Literacy Team charged with assisting the MDOE to develop a Statewide Literacy Plan. The Maine Department of Education was awarded the SRCL grant in November 2010. 

Along with many state literacy specialists and classroom specialists we began this journey by looking at other states that had completed their literacy plans. At the helm is Leeann Larsen, Literacy Specialist, MDOE, who has been a great leader for this daunting task of creating a plan for the state.   

“Literacy for ME outlines steps and identifies resources to help educators and others provide children with a strong early childhood foundation in literacy, provide students with effective literacy training throughout their years in school, and provide adults with low levels of literacy with the adult-level training they need.”

The literacy plan is organized around the following 6 components:

  • Strong leadership
  • System-wide commitment and partnerships
  • Standards and curriculum
  • Instruction and intervention
  • Assessment
  • Professional learning

These same components are familiar to Maine educators because they have the same components as other initiatives such as RTI and standards based education. This plan is not in addition to literacy efforts but a guide for ongoing work at the State and local level. Literacy for ME hopes to develop a cultural shift in how we think of literacy. Literacy for ME intends to broaden literacy for all residents of Maine. The plan is designed to initiate partnerships beyond the classroom walls.

The state of Maine defines literacy as: The ability to construct and convey meaning for a variety of purposes through an array of contextual forms and symbols, including reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.  As an art educator who has taught reading along with my regular visual arts curriculum, literacy must not be designated to just Language Arts classes. Literacy is continually defined and expanded in our contemporary world.

Be looking for the formal plan to be launched in August 2012. 

Thank you Lisa for providing this information!

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Teacher and Students Collaborate

May 29, 2011

Maine Scholar Leader Dinner

This post was written by and photographs taken by Lisa Gilman, art teacher from Winthrop Middle School.

Attending the Maine Association for Middle Level Education (MAMLE) conference every Fall gives me a morale boost about working with middle school students. At one of the conferences I learned about the Maine Scholar Leader Dinner.  The event happens annually each Spring and Maine middle schools are invited to send two students for recognition.  I learned that the two students contend for the one table favor. In a moment of sentiment, I offered to make pottery for each of the 80 students. That was two years ago and 160 pots later.

Seeing all the work has generated interest from students in my own school. They want to know how they can get this coveted recognition. This year, on the next day after the banquet, the students representing my school let me know  how thrilled they were about the recognition. They couldn’t wait to tell me which color pottery they had taken home.

I throw all the pottery and my middle school students glaze them. After the work is glazed I use a glaze pen and write the words, “Laugh, Dream, Create, Imagine” on each piece. I include a card with a poem with the following for each student.

Laugh today

Dream for tomorrow

Create without worry

Imagine your possibilities

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