Posts Tagged ‘MAAI’

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MALI Map

October 7, 2015

Where are those MALI Teacher Leaders?

MALI_V1_Color_100ppiOver the summer one of the Maine Arts Commission interns created a giant map that hangs in the conference room at the Commission that shows where the 73 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) teachers teach. It is very impressive and it reminds me of the impact that leaders in arts education are making across the state. We are fortunate! You can check out the map google map below which illustrates the information as well. Click on the marks to see who the Teacher Leader is and where they teach.

I hope you will consider being a MALI Teacher Leader in the next phase. You can read more about the initiative and learn more about the structure of the team and access great resources at http://www.maineartsassessment.com/.

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. MALI is a program of the Maine Arts Commission. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Dear Administrator,

September 17, 2015

Support professional development

photoI know that the professional learning opportunity on October 9 is going to be so valuable that I’ve written a “Dear Administrator” letter that you can use to support your request to attend.  The Biennial Statewide Arts Ed conference, The Measure of Success, is being held at Point Lookout Conference Center in Northport. The letter goes like this… (see below) and can be accessed by clicking here http://mainearts.maine.gov/CMSContent/arts_in_education/Biennial_Statewide/MALI_Letter_of_Support.pdf. (you can download it from there easily). Please note: I realize that the formatting might be a total mess below but I promise that when you download it from the link above that it will be fine!

All the details and conference registration are located at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide. Please feel free to email me if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

TODAY IS THE LAST DAY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE EARLY-BIRD REGISTRATION COST OF $90. Tomorrow the cost goes to $100 and the day of the conference, the walk-in cost is $110. I hope that you can join us!

June 2015
Dear Administrator:
The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI – formerly known as the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative) is pleased to announce the 2015 Biennial Statewide Arts Education conference “Maine Arts Education: The Measure of Success” will be held on Friday, October 9, Point Lookout Conference Center, Northport. On behalf of your visual and performing arts education teaching staff, I encourage you to support their participation in the conference. We are fortunate in Maine to have a vibrant community of arts professionals who will attend the conference with the common goal of advancing arts education for the benefit of all students in schools across Maine.
MALI (MAAI) was established in 2011 by the Maine Department of Education and is presently a
program of the Maine Arts Commission. The conference program is grounded in the mission:
MALI is committed to the development of Teacher leaders to ensure deep understanding and
meaningful implementation of high quality teaching, learning and assessment in the Arts.”
Conference opportunities include engaging workshops on Assessment, Teacher Effectiveness, Arts
Integration, Proficiency-Based Education, Movement/Dance and the Creative Process, Brain
Development, Studio Habits of Mind, Benchmarking in Music, and Assessment in Visual Arts. These
workshops will showcase the latest in research and practice, provide interactive learning through
hands-on experiences, and challenge teachers thinking. The content of the conference can be applied
immediately to teaching and learning in your school–helping to advance your goals.
The MALI shares your vision for ensuring that Maine students receive the best possible education and
that your teachers possess a deep knowledge and understanding of teaching and learning. The
professional learning opportunities made available through the MALI are unparalleled in the field of
visual and performing arts education in Maine. MALI offers a comprehensive opportunity for educators who are engaged with the arts in learning to experience exemplary practices, methodologies, and research.
I appreciate your commitment to visual and performing arts education and in supporting your arts
educators with release time and in whatever way you can, so they may attend. In closing please accept
my gratitude for your leadership that ensures a quality, comprehensive education for all students across Maine.
Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions by email argy.nestor@maine.gov or by phone
207-287-2713.
Yours in Arts Education,
Ms. Argy Nestor
Director of Arts Education
Maine Arts Commission
The conference is brought to you by the Maine Arts Learning Initiative (MALI), a program of the Maine Arts Commission.
Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. MALI is a program of the Maine Arts Commission. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.
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Measure of Success Conference

September 15, 2015

Workshop Videos – October 9

The biennial Statewide Arts Education conference, The Measure of Success, is being held at the Point Lookout Conference Center in Northport on Friday, October 9. The early-bird registration of $90 runs until Thursday, September 17. After that the cost goes to $100 and at the door is $110.

This years conference is unique for many reasons. The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI, formerly MAAI) has gone all out this year to provide you with outstanding workshops in two formats along with a day filled with celebrating arts educators and recognizing the excellent work that takes place every school day and beyond! You can read about the workshop format in a post from last week at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/09/10/a-word-about-the-conference-presentations/.

In addition, each of the workshop leaders have provided a short video that provides an overview of the workshop content. THE VIDEOS ARE ALL BELOW! If you take a look at the videos and read the workshop descriptions at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide-Workshop-Descriptions# you will get a clear picture of what the conference and these amazing educators have to offer!

TO GO DIRECTLY TO REGISTRATION:  https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1726177 and please email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov if you have any questions. I hope to see you on October 9!

  • Studio Habits of Mind: Using the “Hidden Curriculum” to Encourage Student Autonomy with Visual Arts Teachers Theresa Cerceo from Dr. Levesque Elementary, Wisdom Middle/High School and Janie Snider from Hancock Grammar School

  • Making Maine and ME with Visual Arts Teacher Jennie Driscoll from Brunswick High School

  • Evaluating Individual Proficiency within the Large Ensemble with Music Teacher Jen Etter from York Middle School

  • Dancing with the Creative Process: How to incorporate standards-based dance and movement activities in classroom learning and assessment with Dancer, Educator, and Teaching Artist John Morris

  • In the Midst of Madness with Music Teacher Jen Nash from Sabasticook Valley Middle School, Dance Teacher MaryEllen Schaper from Bonny Eagle Middle School, and Associate Professor, Educational Leadership from USM Jeff Beaudry, Ph.D.

  • Empathy, Kindness and Wonder, Arts Integration at Work with the Director and Founder of Sweet Tree Arts Lindsay Pinchbeck

  • Brains on Fire: How Research on the Brain Can Inform Arts Education with the Executive Director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education Catherine Ring

  • From Cool to Tool: Technology Integration with Student Learning in Mind with Music Teacher  Kate Smith from Central School in South Berwick, Mountain Valley High School in Rumford Teacher Jeff Bailey, and Mt. Blue High School in Farmington Teacher Dan Ryder

  • Proficiency Based Learning: An Advocacy Story Music Teacher Rob Westerberg from York High School

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. MALI is a program of the Maine Arts Commission. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

 

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Measure of Success!

September 9, 2015

Early-bird registration deadline looming

Tomorrow, Thursday, September 10 is the DEADLINE for the early-bird registration for the upcoming exciting professional development opportunity:

Statewide Biennial Arts Education Conference

The MEASURE of SUCCESS

Friday, October 9, Point Lookout Conference Center, Northport

8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The conference offers a rich choice of workshops facilitated by some of Maine’s finest educators and artists. http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide

TO REGISTER PLEASE GO TO:

http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide-Register

Please join us in celebrating arts education!
Register by September 10 – Early Bird

$90.00 payment can be made with a school purchase order, check, or credit card.
$10.00 for undergraduate students with a valid student ID.

Register after September 10
$100 for any payment received after September 10.
$125 for Walk-in registration.

If you need a letter of support to use in your request to your administrator/district to attend please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/CMSContent/arts_in_education/Biennial_Statewide/MALI_Letter_of_Support.pdf.

MALI_V1_Color_100ppiThe conference is sponsored by the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI), a program of the Maine Arts Commission (MAC). To view the resources developed by MALI please go to http://www.maineartsassessment.com/. To learn more about the MAC please go to https://mainearts.maine.gov. To learn more about the MAC arts education programs please go to https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Arts-in-Education.

QUESTIONS about anything above please contact Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Rob’s Talking

September 2, 2015

When a former student speaks, listen up

Thank you to Rob Westerberg, music educator from York High School and co-founder of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (formerly known as the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative), who provided the following blog post.

Katrina Faulstich is a former student teacher of mine and choral director at Bedford High School in Massachusetts. She has been doing some course work for her Masters degree down in Connecticut this Summer. As part of that work she submitted a paper for her Measurement and Evaluation class called, “The Use of Recordings to Assess Individuals in High School Chorus”. If you are not a high school choral director, don’t stop reading – this is one of the most informing pieces of writing I’ve come across in awhile. There are takeaways that translate to every music educator regardless of age group or specialty. To be sure, Katrina lays out her plans for assessing individuals in her program. And they are really cool. But there is so much more going on here and it’s a game changer when you look at it through a finer lens. She concludes her opening paragraph with the statement, “With so many changes affecting education, teachers must remember to do what is best for student learning and achievement.” Ya think? My takeaways from her paper:

  • We always cry foul when colleagues and administrators marginalize academic music programs, but research shows that they have every right to. J. A. Russell and J. R. Austin (2010): “researchers examining assessment practice in secondary music classrooms found that attendance and attitude were the most common grading criteria employed by instrumental and choral music teachers” (“Music Assessment Research,” para. 3). If this statement were true for any other teacher in any other core subject area, they would be fired. And you know it. We’ve been doing it however – and getting away with it – for generations. The research found that music teachers on average based 60% of grade weight on non-achievement criteria. When MAAI (MALI) ran its first state conference in 2011, the debate we had on the Leadership Team was whether or not to include the word “assessment” in it, the argument being that if we did it would scare arts teachers away. In retrospect, I don’t know which is scarier: that we were actually fearful about including the word or that we had reason to be.
  • We are too often guilty of assessing the skills of an entire ensemble over those of the individuals within. L.H. Tracy (2002): Two hundred and seventy four high school choral teachers completed a survey. (It was found that) teachers seemed to use personal philosophy to decide whether or not to assess individuals. In accordance with previous studies, Tracy found most teachers assess students on attendance, attitude, and effort. Tracey attributed this to the “‘teach as we are taught’ phenomenon” (p. 154). Most participants reported using in-class observations as a form of assessment, but Tracy stated this does not mean teachers know what individuals know and are able to do (Colwell, 1991, as cited in Tracy, 2002). Personal assessment “philosophy” has no place in 21st century classrooms. We know from a national standpoint as well as from an international standpoint that assessment of individual student growth is now a foundational expectation of every classroom teacher, period. We can get caught up too easily in state and federal mandates that carry this to an extreme with the “how oftens” and the “let’s standardize all this” filtering out the real issue here. There are effective ways of assessing that enhance and articulate student learning, and there are ways that don’t. That debate isn’t being held here. But to avoid individual assessment because of those and/or other filters that we allow to impact our choices? Inexcusable.
  • Tracy indicated many chorus teachers lack training in assessment and therefore do not use the best assessment practices. This was the foundational reason we formed MAAI 5 years ago. To date, we have provided professional development to over 1,200 arts educators here in Maine, provided by peers in the trenches fighting the same battles as everyone else. Though it is entrenched in research, all of it is foundational and practical so teachers can individualize their work based on their setting and available resources. Maine’s arts educators are running out of excuses on this one.
  • Individual assessment facilitates growth. Katrina alluded to a study in which students who were assessed on sight reading skills for instance showed significant improvement over those who were not assessed. We cannot look at assessment as something that “gets in the way of what I’m trying to do” any longer. Conceptually, curriculum, assessment and instruction must be an integrated entity. When we divide these elements like slices of pie we miss out on the real power of each. Our students benefit when we transparently link them in a thoughtful, sequential and systematic way. Research supports this for every other core subject area, and it supports it for the arts as well.
  • Many teachers justified the lack of individual performance assessments by claiming teachers do not have time to assess each student during class time. Kotora suggested researchers look into teachers’ use of computer, audio, and video technology to assess individual students in chorus. I literally refer to my career as the years I taught before attending the Hartford, Connecticut MENC Eastern Division Conference in February 2007, and the years I’ve taught since. That was when I discovered Smartmusic. I’m not a Smartmusic shill, and I don’t believe it’s the best technology for every situation. Far from it. But through Smartusic I found a way to assess every individual in my chorus. At the time I had 230 singers in a school of 650 with NO way to individually assess them. Technology changed that, and transformed my courses, my curriculum, my instruction and, most importantly, my students learning. Mind you, that was eight and a half years ago. The vast landscape of technology at our fingertips now offers astounding opportunities for individual assessment in the large group setting.
  • We need to listen to our newer colleagues to the profession. Katrina is a great example of this. She prefaces her paper with the statement that she already utilizes individual assessment in her classroom, but she’s not satisfied with her strategies. She already does it but isn’t satisfied! How many times have we as veteran teachers filtered out valuable growth opportunities with a wee small voice on the inside of us that says as a rebuttal, “but I’ve always done it my way and it works?” To satirize the meme that is often used in social media these days, “But I’ve always done it my way and it works”, said no beginning teacher ever. Katrina and her classmate Kaitlin Young, Drew and Ashley Albert, Jen Etter, Jen Nash, Jake Sturdevant. I wrote my own blog post a couple of years ago on this topic (http://goobermusicteachers.com/2013/03/02/nothing-to-learn-from-beginning-teachers/) and feel even stronger about it today than when I wrote it. Inexperience = searching. And perhaps that’s something we can all give them more credit for.

There’s much more in Katrina’s paper and it’s worth the read. Working with data and educational studies can be very dry. But from that work can be mined some essential truths. “Assessment based on curricular objectives is important if music education is to be perceived as a legitimate subject” (Shuler, 1990, as cited in Kotora, 2005, p. 73). Choosing to ignore research, best practices, new ideas and new strategies for music instruction is an option. It is. But doing so will inevitably lead to the demise of our programs and of our profession, and research supports this. The 2015-2016 school year is a perfect opportunity for each of us to move our assessment work forward in whatever capacity is available to us in our own schools. Not the state, not the DOE, not NAfME, not your administrators, not MALI, but your STUDENTS will be the beneficiaries. And that’s why we’re here to begin with, isn’t it?

Fortunately for us Katrina’s paper is available on the Maine Arts Assessment Resources website at http://media.wix.com/ugd/4747f3_fd6b4c29ecbd434cb73884fa7b3be72a.pdf.

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Welcome Back!

August 25, 2015

2015-16 School year

Summer 2015 2nd group

MALI Summer Institute, August 3-5, 2015, USM, Portland

It’s back to school time and the air is changing. Whether you are in full swing with teaching or in your classroom preparing for students or perhaps waiting at home for the first day with “kids”, I know that the school year is upon you in some form.

I can sense that it is going to be a great year for visual and performing arts education in Maine! The Maine Arts Commission has been busy all summer supporting the work of Maine Visual and Performing Arts Education. Read below just a few of the ways in which MAC is doing just that:

  • It’s official, on August 3, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative became the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative during the opening at the summer institute. Read about the shift at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/.
  • In addition to the name change MALI sent a representative team to the Teach to Lead Summit in Washington, D.C., July 22-24 sponsored by the US DOE and the National Board. The experience launched us into phase 5 in an amazing way. We found ourselves at the same table with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/07/25/teach-to-lead/.
  • On August 3-5 the MALI summer institute took place at USM, Portland campus. It was a fabulous learning opportunity where 12 new Teacher Leaders created an action plan that is turning into a workshop to be presented during the 2015-16 school year across Maine. This brings the total of Teacher Leaders to 73! You can read about the Teacher Leader work at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/13/teacher-leaders/.
  • The veteran Teacher Leaders used a Logic Model to guide their work. Starting with a “problem” they created a plan that they will take action on during the next several months. Pretty amazing work!
  • The biennial fall arts ed conference is happening on Friday, October 9, Point Lookout Conference Center, Arts Education: The Measure of Success. Early bird registration and detailed information is at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide.
  • Fourteen Teaching Artists participated in one day of the MALI summer institute – what a treat to have so many in one location. Read about their participation at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/12/teaching-artists/.
  • The Teaching Artist roster expanded this summer to a total of 40. You can read about the program and check out the roster at https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Teaching-Artist-Roster. Please consider contracting with one (or more) of these artists for your students during this school year. Another call for the roster will go out in the near future. Watch this blog and arts ed list-serv for the invitation.
  • The statewide visual and performing arts education census will be launched this fall and plans are underway to collect data from all 100% of Maine schools. Watch for more information because we will need everyone’s help to make this happen!
  • MALI had an incredible Critical Friend day with 45 educators attending including PK-higher ed teachers and administrators. Read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/22/mali-critical-friend-day/.

As you begin a new school year know that the MAC and MALI are here to assist you on your educational journey. More information on all of the MAC education programs can be found at https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Arts-in-Education.

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MALI Critical Friend Day

August 22, 2015

A great day in Portland!

IMG_0233So impressive were the presentations all day on Thursday during the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Critical Friend Day. Forty-five educators convened at Luther Bonney Hall on the USM, Portland campus. Twenty-four educators made presentations, either a workshop or a logic model idea. When not presenting they joined the critical friends who were a collective of teachers, a principal, an assistant principal, curriculum leader, an assistant superintendent, and an Apple employee. In addition, we had three educators join electronically and two actually gave their presentations from Aroostook county during their prep periods (school is underway). Needless to say it was very cool that they could join us from a distance. The entire day was a TERRIFIC learning opportunity for all involved. The presenters received valuable suggestions so they can tweak and expand on their ideas and the critical friends walked away with new information and ideas to apply to their own work. It is a fabulous opportunity for all involved.

Dance and visual arts teacher leader from Lake Region High School Carmel Collins and music teacher leader from Sebasticook Valley Middle School

Dance and Visual Arts Teacher Leader, Lake Region High School Carmel Collins, and Music Teacher Leader, Sebasticook Valley Middle School

The presentations were in direct connection with the three-day MALI institute that was held earlier this month where over 50 visual and performing arts educators and teaching artists came together for a professional learning opportunity. You can read about the institute in several consecutive blog posts starting with August 10. They had a chance to gain more knowledge in teaching, learning, assessment, proficiency-based education, leadership, advocacy, technology, creativity, integration, and several other relevant topics related to the challenges faced in the visual or performing arts classroom. I had a chance to go from one workshop to the next and it was amazing to see the high quality of work that has been formulated.

Visual Art Teacher Leader Mandi Mitchell from Hermon High School

Visual Art Teacher Leader Mandi MItchell, Hermon High School

You might be wondering what a critical friend is or does. Below is how we guided the work of those who graciously took on the role as “critical friend”.

One definition of “critical” is expressing or involving an analysis of the merits and faults of a work of literature, music, or art. A “friend” is a person who gives assistance. The MALI leadership team asks you to do both in a gentle helpful way. We want the teacher leaders to create the best work possible so please be honest in your feedback.

Rob Westerberg, Nancy Kinkade, Holly Leighton, (hidden) Shari Tarleton, and Virgil Bozeman provide feedback

Rob Westerberg, Nancy Kinkade, Holly Leighton, (hidden) Shari Tarleton, and Virgil Bozeman provide feedback

The workshops will be presented at the local level during the 2015-16 school year. The new teacher leaders (https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/phase-5-maai-teacher-leaders-announced/) will be selecting a location and time and all of the information will be posted so you can see what is offered and plan to attend.

Trevor Marcho Music Teacher Leader Mattanawcook Academy

Trevor Marcho Music Teacher Leader Mattanawcook Academy

The veteran teachers selected a problem and created a plan to solve the problem. The logic model is just that – a way to guide those using it to a clear picture of how to influence and create change. You can read a bit about logic model at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_model.

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Allie Rimkunas, Great Falls Elementary Art Teacher Leader

During the afternoon session we participated in a “messaging” workshop that was facilitated by Kate Smith, music teacher leader from South Berwick. Participants selected a topic that they wanted to refine to be able to communicate clearly and concisely at a moments notice when the opportunity arises.

Art Teacher Leader, Lisa Ingraham, Madison and Critical Friend Hollie Hilton

Art Teacher Leader, Lisa Ingraham, Madison and Critical Friend Hollie Hilton

Needless to say yesterday was a great day for Arts education in Maine. Nothing like being in an environment where everyone is talking, thinking, exchanging about visual and performing arts education – directly connected to all the issues and topics of education in general! If you’d like to read about the teacher leaders and leadership team please go to the Maine Arts Assessment site at http://www.maineartsassessment.com/.  You can be part of the next quality learning opportunity at the Biennial Statewide conference being held on Friday, October 9, Point Lookout Conference Center, Northport, Maine. Information and registration for the great day we have planned is located at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide. If you’d like to learn more about being involved in MALI and the opportunities that the initiative provides please be sure and email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

Music Teacher Leader Kate Smith, and Critical Friends, AOS 92 Curriculum Leader Mary Boyle and 2014 Maine Teacher of the Year Karen MacDonald

Music Teacher Leader Kate Smith, and Critical Friends, AOS 92 Curriculum Leader Mary Boyle and 2014 Maine Teacher of the Year Karen MacDonald

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email me know if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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