Posts Tagged ‘Maine art education’

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Youth Art Month

February 2, 2019

Call for student artwork

For more than 20 years, the Portland Museum of Art and the Maine Art Education Association (MAEA) have collaborated to bring National Youth Art Month to Maine. This annual observance emphasizes the value of art education and encourages support for quality school art programs through a month-long exhibition of artwork by K-12 students throughout the state. The exhibition runs from March 1 through March 31, 2019 on the Lower Ground Floor of the PMA. Admission to the exhibition is free for the public.

REGISTRATION January 14 – February 5

You must be a member of the Maine Art Education Association (or become one) in order to exhibit your student work.

2-dimensional work only and must be framed and under glass or blemish free plexi-glass.

Student work should be photographed before framing and is submitted with the registrations.

Questions? Contact the YAM coordinator Elyse Pelletier, Scarborough High School at epelletier@scarboroughschools.org.

Artwork Drop-Off

Wednesday, February 6, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m

Friday, February 8, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday, February 9, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Back entrance of the Portland Museum of Art at 99 Spring Street. The museum cannot store artwork packaging or wrapping material. Upon drop-off, you must leave with the packaging.
Satellite Drop-Off: Suzanne Goulet @ Waterville SHS – will receive through Friday, February 8 at Waterville SHS – 2:30pm

Reception – Saturday, March 2

Pick-Up
Portland Museum of Art
    Wednesday, April 3, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Thursday, April 4, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
All remaining art will be collected by a MAEA agent and will be
available for pick up at the Spring Conference at the MAEA Spring Conference – Saturday, April 6 – Belfast Area High School
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ArtWorks!

January 12, 2019

University of Maine campus

ArtWorks!, an art program for students in grades K through 8, provides children an opportunity to explore the world of art through hands-on experiences with a variety of visual media, the history of art, and the viewing of art works. The spring ArtWorks! session will run for five consecutive weeks with classes held on Friday afternoonsfrom February 8-March 8, 3:30-5:00 in Lord Hall on the University of Maine campus. The fifth week will be the Children’s exhibition held on March 8th.

Parents or guardians are responsible for their children’s transportation to and from the program.  Classes will begin promptly at 3:30 and conclude at 5:00 sharpFor safety, students will not be allowed to leave the classroom until the pre-designated adult has come to the room to pick him or her up.

Class sections are organized by age and/or grade level, and spaces are very limited. Acceptance into the program will be on a first-come-first-serve basis. A list of alternates will be kept in case of vacancies.

A $25 course feewill be charged for the spring session to cover the costs of materials used during the classes. The course fee must be paid on or before the first day of classes. Checks should be made out to the University of Maine. A limited number of scholarships are available.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: January 31

♥All ArtWorks! classes are taught by Art Education undergraduate students, under the close supervision of Dr. Constant Albertson. ArtWorks! is a lab school designed to provide future art teachers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary for success in their future classrooms.To facilitate this, we ask parents and Ed. Techs to stay outside the classroom during the ArtWorks!Sessions.  As this will be one of the students’ first formal teaching experience it is important that it be as realistic as possible. Your cooperation is appreciated.

♥  Art classes will take place on the second and third floors of Lord Hall. There is an elevator to all floors and the bathrooms are accessible. Art Education students will contact you prior to the first class to give you your child(ren)’s room number(s). If your child has particular learning needs or allergies, it is the parent/guardian’s responsibility to contact Dr. Albertson directly prior to the first class, and inform the art education student who calls you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact Dr. Constant Albertson at 581-3251 or the Dept. of Art, Lord Hall, at 581-3245 or by e-mail: constant@maine.edu.

THE AFTER-SCHOOL ARTWORKS!PROGRAM APPLICATION

Please printclearly (this is very important!)

Student’s name:_________________________________________________________________________

 

Age:_______ Grade Level:_______   School: ________________________________________________

 

Parent or Guardian’s name:________________________________ Day Phone:____________________

 

Email Address:________________________________________Evening Phone:____________________

APPLICATION DEADLINE: January 31

Please make checks out to University of Maine.  Send applications to University of Maine, Dept. of Art, Lord Hall, Orono, ME. 04469-5743. Attention:  ArtWorks!

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Changing Kids’ Minds

August 23, 2018

LEAPS of IMAGINATION

“Most people assume that imagination takes place in the head, but the hands are just as important.” ~ Mitch Resnick, MIT Media Lab

When children find themselve at the intersection of discovering their capacity to make art and exploring the natural world, deep thinking happens. Local kids who participated in the Langlais LEAPS summer program “got the picture” by soaking up inspiration from the artist himself- Bernard Langlais.

In six weeks of observation, research, and making, led by LEAPS’ artist, Susan Beebe, children engaged in (1) a study of butterflies (2) the creation of a collaborative bas relief, and (3) the art of speaking through hand-made animal puppets – while becoming stewards of the Earth. And that was only the half of it.

The artworks that evolved reveal how nature inspires art and art helps change minds. Having planted their own garden, kids saw butterflies lay eggs there. From the magic of Langlais’ sculptures, they gained confidence as woodworkers. Walking the paths of the Sculpture Preserve got every child’s brain going. As humans, when we travel down new pathways (either literally or figuratively) we generate new neurons in our brains. We can, through these repeated experiences, actually alter the structure and function of our brains!

Taking kids out on trails, training them to observe closely, and inviting them to transform what they’ve seen into original art has impacted our campers this summer. And their commitment to nature and the practice of forging connections will stick with them down the road.

If you’d like to learn more about LEAPS and how we connect local artists with kids, come along with us. Check out our website. 

Wide-eyed with wonder, and grateful to all who made this program possible, Nancy Harris Frohlich, Director, LEAPS of IMAGINATION

LEAPS of IMAGINATION is a partner with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. This is a repost from the LEAPS of IMAGINATION blog.Thank you Nancy Harris Frohlich for permission to repost this from the LEAPS of IMAGINATION blog

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Heartwarming

December 5, 2017

Share a story

I received an email from a former student last week who is teaching art at York High School. David Shenett was moved to action after a conversation with his mother about Jacob Thompson. What follows is the story of how York High School students responded. Thank you David for sharing!

The story of Jacob Thompson, the young boy whose only wish was to experience a final Christmas and receive as many Christmas cards as he could, made national headlines. Thousands of cards and notes of support came from around the nation. Police came from all over New England to deliver cards to this little boy who had little time left. 
While talking with my mom on the phone about this, she asked me “What do you plan to do?”
I responded that I wasn’t sure what she meant. She said: “You are an art teacher. Where are your cards?”
It hadn’t occurred to me.
The next day I explained Jacob’s story to all of my students – my Art 1 classes, my Ceramics classes, my sculpture classes, all my classes. Many of the kids had heard of Jacob and had even thought about making a card for him. That day we all made cards. We painted, we folded, we drew, we threw penguins everywhere we could. Other classes in other parts of our school heard what we were doing and contributed their own cards. And they wrote – unprompted – some of the most heartfelt wishes for a Merry Christmas and support and good wishes I’d ever heard. The true power of art was on full display and the kids ‘got it’. They saw what art can do for the soul and for others. Looking at the stack and having experienced the tremendous enthusiasm and energy the kids exhibited that day, I was moved to tears. I have a little boy about Jacob’s age. As a teacher, I don’t think I’ve ever been more proud of a group of kids.
That evening I made the trip to Maine Medical Center to deliver our box of cards from York High School. The nurses were very impressed with the artistry some of the cards had, and they promptly brought our box into Jacob’s room where he was sleeping.
Jacob had his Christmas and soon passed away. He received thousands of cards and gifts. Maybe other schools did the same thing?  Did he even see ours? Who knows? But what we did will be something I will never forget. 
I just wanted to share this, especially as we near the time of the year where we put other ahead of ourselves and express, sometimes visually, what they mean to us.
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In Today’s News

April 12, 2017

Collaborative work

PATHS students with some of the fence parts.

This is a very large collaborative project underway with the Wentworth School in Scarborough and the welding students at Portland Arts and Technology High School (PATHS). There are 32 students from 12 sending schools taking part from PATHS. This is a great example of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math). The students are creating a fence for the existing school garden that will become a gallery for outdoor art and science projects. Art teacher Joanne Maloney is involved along with the teachers who teach the STEM subjects.  Some of the work will focus on kinesthetic, or tactile learning, and movement.

Close up of a flower on the fence.

Later on in May teaching artist Ann Thompson will work with Wentworth students to create wire sculptures for display on the fence.

The coordination of the idea has been enormous, involving many adults and students, and a wonderful example of collaboration.

To read the entire article from The Forecaster written by Kate Irish Collins, April 3, 2017, please CLICK HERE.

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Monhegan Residencies

February 18, 2017

Open to Maine Artists and Teachers – Deadline March 17

Photo by Bradley Beukema; 2016 resident and art teacher Krisanne Baker night painting on Monhegan.

2016 resident and art teacher Krisanne Baker night painting on Monhegan.

MONHEGAN—The Monhegan Artists’ Residency is pleased to announce its 2017 residency programs. Residencies are available to Maine-based visual artists during the weeks of May 27 to June 30, and September 2 to October 7. To accommodate the summer schedule of Maine K-12 teachers, there is also a two-week residency from July 2 to 14 open exclusively to art teachers. Applications are now being accepted online at www.monheganartistsresidency.org through March 17.

Krisanne Baker, art teacher at Medomak Valley High School in Waldoboro, was the 2016 Monhegan Art Teacher Resident. The body of paintings she produced during her two weeks on the island depict land, ocean and expansive skies at night that include planets and constellations.  She often worked outdoors at night wearing small LED lights, with her color palette laid out in consistent, planned manner so as to know what to reach for in partial darkness.

Krisanne Baker Little Spruce Sentinel at Lobster Cove, 2016, Oil on panel, 24 x 24 inches

Krisanne Baker Little Spruce Sentinel at Lobster Cove, 2016, Oil on panel, 24 x 24 inches

In addition to making a body of paintings during her two-week residency, she also did some underwater filming for her next water art activism short.  This continues her way of combining many of her interests through her art practice, her teaching and her environmental work focusing on protecting water sources and water quality.  She is involved with the Medomak Valley Land Trust and engages her high school art students in environmental work. Krisanne is currently showing her work at Husson University in an exhibition titled ‘Water is Life’: Art & Science on behalf of our oceans (January 20 – March 31, 2017). See more about Krisanne at http://www.krisannebaker.com/paintings_drawings__printmaking

Krisanne Baker working on the deck of her Monhegany residency studio, 2016

Krisanne Baker working on the deck of her Monhegany residency studio, 2016

Not just for landscape painters, the Monhegan Artists’ Residency is open to artists working in new media, photography, sculpture, drawing, painting, and multi-media. This year’s jurors include Chris Stiegler, curator, art historian, and chair of the MFA in Studio Art at the Maine College of Art, Portland; Hilary Irons, artist, and co-founder/curator of Able Baker Contemporary, Portland; and Kelly Finlay, a Monhegan Artists’ Residency board member and museum educator at the Farnsworth Museum of Art, Rockland.

Founded in 1989, the Monhegan Artists’ Residency program is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit supported by donors, art galleries, corporate sponsors, and foundation grants.     

Photos taken by Bradley Beukema.  

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Brunswick Junior High School

January 31, 2016

Family Art Night – February 5, 5 to 7:30, cafeteria

Family Art Night 2016

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