Posts Tagged ‘Maine Arts Assessment Initaitive’

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Rob’s Talking

September 2, 2015

When a former student speaks, listen up

Thank you to Rob Westerberg, music educator from York High School and co-founder of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (formerly known as the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative), who provided the following blog post.

Katrina Faulstich is a former student teacher of mine and choral director at Bedford High School in Massachusetts. She has been doing some course work for her Masters degree down in Connecticut this Summer. As part of that work she submitted a paper for her Measurement and Evaluation class called, “The Use of Recordings to Assess Individuals in High School Chorus”. If you are not a high school choral director, don’t stop reading – this is one of the most informing pieces of writing I’ve come across in awhile. There are takeaways that translate to every music educator regardless of age group or specialty. To be sure, Katrina lays out her plans for assessing individuals in her program. And they are really cool. But there is so much more going on here and it’s a game changer when you look at it through a finer lens. She concludes her opening paragraph with the statement, “With so many changes affecting education, teachers must remember to do what is best for student learning and achievement.” Ya think? My takeaways from her paper:

  • We always cry foul when colleagues and administrators marginalize academic music programs, but research shows that they have every right to. J. A. Russell and J. R. Austin (2010): “researchers examining assessment practice in secondary music classrooms found that attendance and attitude were the most common grading criteria employed by instrumental and choral music teachers” (“Music Assessment Research,” para. 3). If this statement were true for any other teacher in any other core subject area, they would be fired. And you know it. We’ve been doing it however – and getting away with it – for generations. The research found that music teachers on average based 60% of grade weight on non-achievement criteria. When MAAI (MALI) ran its first state conference in 2011, the debate we had on the Leadership Team was whether or not to include the word “assessment” in it, the argument being that if we did it would scare arts teachers away. In retrospect, I don’t know which is scarier: that we were actually fearful about including the word or that we had reason to be.
  • We are too often guilty of assessing the skills of an entire ensemble over those of the individuals within. L.H. Tracy (2002): Two hundred and seventy four high school choral teachers completed a survey. (It was found that) teachers seemed to use personal philosophy to decide whether or not to assess individuals. In accordance with previous studies, Tracy found most teachers assess students on attendance, attitude, and effort. Tracey attributed this to the “‘teach as we are taught’ phenomenon” (p. 154). Most participants reported using in-class observations as a form of assessment, but Tracy stated this does not mean teachers know what individuals know and are able to do (Colwell, 1991, as cited in Tracy, 2002). Personal assessment “philosophy” has no place in 21st century classrooms. We know from a national standpoint as well as from an international standpoint that assessment of individual student growth is now a foundational expectation of every classroom teacher, period. We can get caught up too easily in state and federal mandates that carry this to an extreme with the “how oftens” and the “let’s standardize all this” filtering out the real issue here. There are effective ways of assessing that enhance and articulate student learning, and there are ways that don’t. That debate isn’t being held here. But to avoid individual assessment because of those and/or other filters that we allow to impact our choices? Inexcusable.
  • Tracy indicated many chorus teachers lack training in assessment and therefore do not use the best assessment practices. This was the foundational reason we formed MAAI 5 years ago. To date, we have provided professional development to over 1,200 arts educators here in Maine, provided by peers in the trenches fighting the same battles as everyone else. Though it is entrenched in research, all of it is foundational and practical so teachers can individualize their work based on their setting and available resources. Maine’s arts educators are running out of excuses on this one.
  • Individual assessment facilitates growth. Katrina alluded to a study in which students who were assessed on sight reading skills for instance showed significant improvement over those who were not assessed. We cannot look at assessment as something that “gets in the way of what I’m trying to do” any longer. Conceptually, curriculum, assessment and instruction must be an integrated entity. When we divide these elements like slices of pie we miss out on the real power of each. Our students benefit when we transparently link them in a thoughtful, sequential and systematic way. Research supports this for every other core subject area, and it supports it for the arts as well.
  • Many teachers justified the lack of individual performance assessments by claiming teachers do not have time to assess each student during class time. Kotora suggested researchers look into teachers’ use of computer, audio, and video technology to assess individual students in chorus. I literally refer to my career as the years I taught before attending the Hartford, Connecticut MENC Eastern Division Conference in February 2007, and the years I’ve taught since. That was when I discovered Smartmusic. I’m not a Smartmusic shill, and I don’t believe it’s the best technology for every situation. Far from it. But through Smartusic I found a way to assess every individual in my chorus. At the time I had 230 singers in a school of 650 with NO way to individually assess them. Technology changed that, and transformed my courses, my curriculum, my instruction and, most importantly, my students learning. Mind you, that was eight and a half years ago. The vast landscape of technology at our fingertips now offers astounding opportunities for individual assessment in the large group setting.
  • We need to listen to our newer colleagues to the profession. Katrina is a great example of this. She prefaces her paper with the statement that she already utilizes individual assessment in her classroom, but she’s not satisfied with her strategies. She already does it but isn’t satisfied! How many times have we as veteran teachers filtered out valuable growth opportunities with a wee small voice on the inside of us that says as a rebuttal, “but I’ve always done it my way and it works?” To satirize the meme that is often used in social media these days, “But I’ve always done it my way and it works”, said no beginning teacher ever. Katrina and her classmate Kaitlin Young, Drew and Ashley Albert, Jen Etter, Jen Nash, Jake Sturdevant. I wrote my own blog post a couple of years ago on this topic (http://goobermusicteachers.com/2013/03/02/nothing-to-learn-from-beginning-teachers/) and feel even stronger about it today than when I wrote it. Inexperience = searching. And perhaps that’s something we can all give them more credit for.

There’s much more in Katrina’s paper and it’s worth the read. Working with data and educational studies can be very dry. But from that work can be mined some essential truths. “Assessment based on curricular objectives is important if music education is to be perceived as a legitimate subject” (Shuler, 1990, as cited in Kotora, 2005, p. 73). Choosing to ignore research, best practices, new ideas and new strategies for music instruction is an option. It is. But doing so will inevitably lead to the demise of our programs and of our profession, and research supports this. The 2015-2016 school year is a perfect opportunity for each of us to move our assessment work forward in whatever capacity is available to us in our own schools. Not the state, not the DOE, not NAfME, not your administrators, not MALI, but your STUDENTS will be the beneficiaries. And that’s why we’re here to begin with, isn’t it?

Fortunately for us Katrina’s paper is available on the Maine Arts Assessment Resources website at http://media.wix.com/ugd/4747f3_fd6b4c29ecbd434cb73884fa7b3be72a.pdf.

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Another Arts Teacher’s Story: Frances Kellogg

April 14, 2015

MAAI Teacher Leader series

This is the ninth and last blog post for 2015 on the Phase 4 Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s (MAAI) Teacher Leaders sharing their stories. This series contains a set of questions to provide the opportunity for you to learn from and about others. You can learn more about MAAI at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI# and learn more about all 61 of the MAAI Teacher Leaders at http://www.maineartsassessment.com/#!teacher-leaders/c1qxk.

4747f3_d808375765484117b6ae1b7e8f05a0cf.jpg_srz_p_147_138_75_22_0.50_1.20_0Frances Kellogg currently teaches K-3 classroom music and grades 6-8 chorus at Ellsworth Elementary Middle School.  She has taught in Ellsworth for the last three years.  Frances has just over 400 students and sees them twice each week for a total of 60 minutes. Previously, she taught PreK-6 classroom music and 3-8 chorus at Jay Elementary School and Spruce Mountain Middle School. This is her eighth year as a music teacher in Maine. Frances received her B.M.E. from the University of Maine at Orono in 2007, and currently performs with the University Percussion Ensemble there.

What do you like best about being a music educator?

I love to see students get inspired and have fun. I hear so many teachers say how much they wish they could do more creative things in their classrooms, but can’t because there isn’t time–often due to curriculum or testing. I get to watch my students unleash their creativity and give them the chance to think outside the box, while still teaching and giving them the information they need. I love it when my students draw a connection between music and ANYTHING else–their classroom, home, visual art, or physical education–when they make that connection, they get more excited about what we are learning and also remember more of what we are learning .

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

A supportive community is a major key to a successful arts education:  support from the students’ parents, teachers, and administration. But building that support needs flexibility and a willingness to be a part of it. Make yourself seen at a parade or a baseball game can make all the difference to a student or the community as a whole. Being willing to adapt the framing of a lesson to be more interesting to your students can make the difference between a lesson they will forget and a lesson they will ask to repeat again.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Assessment has given me a way to know not only what my students are learning, but also how well I am teaching. I have long used assessment as a tool for measuring student knowledge, but have more recently learned how to use assessment as feedback for my teaching. If the students aren’t grasping a concept, what do I need to change? What has worked and what hasn’t?  t has been quite the eye-opening adventure for me.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the arts assessment initiative?

Joining MAAI has been a huge growth experience for me. I took a leap, with both feet, into a leadership role which was new territory for me. The greatest benefit of all has been a chance to communicate and collaborate with other arts teachers around the state. I have been very fortunate to not be the only music teacher in my district, but I have often been the only music teacher at my level (elementary vs. high school or middle school). It’s been great to be able to talk with other elementary music teachers and to hear their ideas and perspectives, while at the same time being able to share my own. In addition, MAAI has given me a huge boost of confidence when talking with other arts educators which has in turn given me more confidence in working with other educators at my own school.

What are you most proud of in your career?

My growth. When I first started teaching, I taught things that I thought were fun and would interest students; a lot of them being things I remembered from when I was a kid or things that I learned in college. I tested students on the things I thought they should have learned and never really used them to learn about my teaching. Now, eight years later, I have learned to work with a curriculum, to use assessments with my students to give them and myself feedback, to adapt my lessons to interest my students while still teaching and/or reviewing the concepts that need to be learned, and to still have fun while learning. Looking back eight years, I see a transformation that I am truly proud of and I certainly hope it will continue.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

Negativity. With all the seemingly overwhelming changes happening in education in Maine right now, it’s easy to get sucked in to people complaining or griping or worrying. The only way to fight it is to be positive!

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

A good image. I started out as a nervous and anxious, fresh out of college kid who needed guidance. I didn’t know how to run a music program, or create/work with a curriculum, or put together concerts. I needed a lot of help (or at least it felt like it) when I first started. But I worked hard: I listened to what people told me about what they thought I should do and “how we’ve always done it”, and in the end, I made my own educated choices about what to do.  Whether it was having concerts in the evening vs. during the school day, or giving students the opportunity to earn their recorder to keep (rather than just giving it to them), or taking the risk to ask for funding for a new idea; I was able to make those decisions based on what I had learned. When I left my first job and came to Ellsworth, I had already started down this path, so I had a better idea of what I should do and how I should act and ask for things.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Listen to your students. When my students ask if we can learn about something, I try to find a way to make it happen. Last year, one classroom of third grade students asked if we could sing a song about the environment because they were learning about the rainforest and ecology in their classrooms. So, I found a song that not only focused on saving the environment, but also taught students how to listen for a read two part harmony. Another classroom asked about rap; we discussed what students think rap is vs. what it is (and what it can be), and each classroom wrote a rap together. These two activities were some of the most enjoyable things I taught, because the students were so involved in the process.

If you were given $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

I would split it. Keeping some for myself, I would do some serious house renovations: new kitchen counters, painting, a front deck with a hot tub, and a temperature controlled room for musical instrument storage and enjoyment. With the rest, I would find the right way to invest it in bringing programs and visiting artists into schools, both the school I work for and other schools in my area.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

None. At that point, I will have had a chance to do what I always dreamed of in life:  teach. If I can inspire just one person, then I have done what I needed to do, and that is something to be proud of.

 

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Megas UMaine USM

April 6, 2015

MAAI Mega-regional workshops – last of the school year

Last Thursday and Friday the last two Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s (MAAI) Mega-regional workshops were held at UMaine, Orono and USM, Portland campus. Both were a success and the 127 teachers who participated had positive feedback. It was an opportunity designed just for visual and performing arts educators including teaching artists.

I am so proud of the Teacher Leaders and the workshops they created. MAAI believes that “teachers teaching teachers” is very powerful!

Thank you to the following Teacher Leaders listed below who provided the following workshops:

UMaine, Orono – Thursday, April 2

  • Finding the Hidden Treasure in Art with Student Self Assessment, Jennie Driscoll Brunswick High School Visual Arts
  • Efficient and Effective Assessment in the Elementary Music Classroom, Frances Kellogg Ellsworth Elementary Middle School Music
  • Multiple Pathways: Helping Students Achieve Proficiency in ELA and Social Studies through Performing Arts Class!, Beth Lambert Carrabec High School Performing Arts
  • The Foolish Man Builds his House Upon the Sand: Laying a Firm Foundation for the Arts (and life) in Early Childhood, Judy Fricke Main Street Music Studios Music
  • My Choice-Based Art Class, Nurturing Proficiency through Voice, Choice and Reflective Teaching, Theresa Cerceo Dr. Levesque Elementary, Wisdom Middle/High School Visual Arts
  • Proficiency-Based Education in Visual Art, Gloria Hewett Mount View Middle School Visual Arts
  • Gold, Silver or Bronze? A Rubric fit for the Olympics!, Pam Kinsey Easton Schools Music
  • Rappin’ Differentiated Instruction and Implementing Standards Based Grading, Lisa Neal Nokomis Regional High School Performing Arts

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IMG_1276USM, Portland – Friday, April 3

  • The Studio Habits of Mind: Using the “Hidden Curriculum” to Encourage Student Autonomy, Lisa Ingraham Madison Elementary School Visual Arts
  • The Recipe: Ingredients in a Proficiency-Based Curriculum, Michaela DiGianvittorio and Sarah Gould Gray-New Gloucester High School Visual Arts
  • Unpacking the Standards with your BFF (Best Foot Forward), Cynthia Keating, Village Elementary School Music and Kate Smith, Central Elementary School Music
  • The Foolish Man Builds his House Upon the Sand: Laying a Firm Foundation for the Arts (and life) in Early Childhood, Judy Fricke Main Street Music Studios Music
  • Writing What We Do: A Guide to Standards-Based Curriculum Mapping & Unit Design, Brian McPherson, Woodside Elementary School Visual Arts and Jake Sturtevant, Bonny Eagle High School Music
  • Using Digital Process Folios as a Journaling Approach to Self Assessment, Melanie Crowe Marshwood Middle School Visual Arts
  • Hatching A Songbird: Teaching and Assessing Singing Skills at the Primary Level, Patti Gordan Raymond Elementary School Music
  • Moving Towards Your Goals: Using Technology for Self-Assessment in a Performing Arts Classroom, Emma Campbell Thornton Academy Dance
  • Dancing With the Standards: How to Incorporate Standards-Based Dance and Movement Activities in Classroom Learning and Assessment, John Morris Dance
  • The How and Why of Digital Portfolios, Jeff Orth Richmond Middle/High School Visual Arts

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IMG_2217Thanks also to MAAI Teacher Leaders Janie Snider, Jenni Null, and Shari Tarleton.

Artist showcases took place at each Mega with Teaching Artists John Morris and Stevie McGary provided information on their role and some movement as well.

In the afternoon sessions Proficiency-Based Education and Teacher Effectiveness were the discussion topics. Teachers shared what is happening in their schools, had a chance to ask each other questions and learn from what others are doing. Thanks to the following Teacher Leaders who facilitated the discussion:

UMO – Gloria Hewett and Jen Nash

USM – Jake Sturtevant and Amy Cousins (and several others assisted)

Both Megas were successful due to the work of Leadership Team members:

UMO – Catherine Ring

USM – Rob Westerberg and Jeff Beaudry

A special THANK YOU to Laura Artesani who arranged for the space on the UMaine Orono campus. And to Jeff Beaudry who arranged for the space on the USM, Portland campus!

At the end of the day at USM I said to all the participants how proud I was of the work all visual and performing arts teachers do. I know that the jobs you do can be challenging. At the end of the day at UMaine Orono Catherine asked folks how they were feeling and these are some of the words expressed by the group: inspiring – exhausted but happy – encouraged – enthusiastic – can’t wait to try things back in my classroom – my head is full – overwhelmed but supported – not alone anymore – great resources.  Catherine’s word: proud.

If you didn’t attend any of the four Mega-regional workshops provided this school year by MAAI and are looking for resources I suggest that you go to http://www.maineartsassessment.com/.

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Visual Arts PD Opp

February 21, 2015

Professional development opportunity for visual art educators 

An invitation from Catherine Ring, Ex. Director, New England Institute for Teacher Education

I’d like to personally let you know of a special opportunity coming up right in Augusta, starting MARCH 14 — a 3 credit course on Visual Art Assessment, K-12.  The course will meet for two weekend sessions, March 14 and May 9.

You might wonder, how can I add this to my already full plate?  Is Assessment really necessary, or even possible, in an art room when I see so many students?  It really doesn’t matter where you are on the Assessment bandwagon — both experienced and teachers new to assessment in visual art classrooms have taken this course. There’s always more to learn, and this course gives you the time to talk and learn and try things out — imagine that!

You’ll be surprised at how much art teachers learn from each other – and that’s just what we do! We share resources that arts educators have created or discovered through the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, ask hard questions, problem-solve, try some things out in our classrooms, and figure out what we CAN do in our very busy schedules to help improve teaching, learning and assessment.  The course meets for two weekends only – Friday night (4-8pm) and Saturday (8-4pm) with weekly contact with the instructor, in between.

Screen Shot 2015-02-16 at 4.33.54 PMWe’re especially delighted to announce that Lisa Ingraham will be teaching the course for the New England Institute this spring. Lisa has taught Visual Art for ten years and has been a Teacher Leader in the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative since 2013.  She has a BA in Graphic Design and Illustration from Western Connecticut State University and a MS in Education from Thomas College. Lisa has collaborated with other visual and performing arts teachers from around the state of Maine in reflecting on assessment and designing professional development presentations for regional workshops. Lisa is currently the Secretary and Advocacy Co-chair for the Maine Art Education Association, and is working toward her endorsement in Gifted and Talented Education.

So come join us and find out what’s happening in Maine with assessment in visual art, and with meeting proficiency in the art room. You will be excited to know that arts educators are leading the way and other educators are following suit.  Here are the details:

EDPO 536: Refining Assessment in the Visual Art Classroom, K-12

Augusta, Maine (Viles Arboretum)

Session 1:  Saturday (8-4pm), March 14

Session 2:  Saturday (8-4pm) May 9

This course meets for both sessions

You can choose to take this as a graduate course through our partnership with Endicott College, or for recertification credits for 4.5 CEUs. We can bill your school directly with a purchase order, or are happy to make payment arrangements.

To register, please visit the New England Institute website at www.newenglandinstitute.org. If you have any questions at all, pick up the phone and call me any time, or email me.

Thank you! We hope to hear from you!

Catherine Ring

Executive Director

New England Institute for Teacher Education

PO Box 460

Stonington, Maine 04681

207-367-5807

newenglandinstitute@gmail.com

 

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Successful Mega!

December 2, 2014

MAAI Mega MDIHS

The feedback is clear – the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s Mega – regional workshop at MDI High School last week was a success! Participants learned new information and the work that is done each day in classrooms across Maine was reinforced. Once again the highlight was the opportunity for Arts educators to come together for a professional development opportunity that was designed specifically for them.

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A HUGE THANK YOU to Charlie Johnson and his colleagues at MDI High School for hosting, to the MAAI Teacher Leaders who provided outstanding workshops: Janie Snider, Lisa Ingraham, Shannon Westphall, Frances Kellogg, Sue Barre, Charlie Johnson, to Teaching Artist Stevie McGary for the workshop and artists showcase, and to Catherine Ring, Rob Westerberg, and Nancy Salmon who provided technical assistance and leadership for the day!

I LOVE reading the feedback and how the day influenced participants thinking and teaching. Don’t take my word for it, below is what some of the participants said. I will post more in the near future along with a video that Charlie created to document the day.

  • I can’t believe how quickly this day flew by! As always, I wish that we had more time like this and opportunities to meet… I love these MAAI conferences, I always leave feeling more grounded and ready to take action
  • I like the Habits of Mind posters and the idea of the check list to keep throughout a project to assess each habit… These were really solid examples of what can be done.
  • I have already been implementing a few of these processes into my curriculum. Now, I just need to communicate this to my students in a clearer, more consistent manner.
  • Our district is focusing on Habits of Mind. I didn’t realize Studio Habits of Mind are different, but similar. Definitely a lot of useful information.
  • On the arts assessment website http://www.maineartsassessment.com there is a proficiency toolbox that I will be able to revamp my assessments at my school.

I LEARNED…

  • how to authentically apply the learning results to assessment
  • how to create a simple rubric for standards is an easy way to keep track of what 1, 2, 3, 4 etc actually means
  • simple, quick class assessments concrete examples of student growth — A+
  • about how to apply assessments to the art classroom and how to make the language usable for students of all ages
  • recording with the ipad for quick assessment
  • strategies for holding myself and my students accountable for what they are learning and creating in the art room
  • engage and persist can be a way to think about behavior in a positive way
  • about some fun and creative resources to help with assessing my students
  • how students demonstrate their learning through a hands-on project (pinhole cameras)
  • even a quick 60-second movement can benefit across the school day
  • how to clearly describe different standards and allow students to have an important part in the grading process
  • some quick and effective ways to assess students on the fly in the elementary music setting, and how to score and record them.
  • all about the site: http://www.maineartsassessment.com/, I LOVE IT. Need to spend loads of time there.

The above list includes just some of the feedback from November 25. If this is information that you’d like to learn more about please be sure and attend another Mega-regional workshop that is planned for this school year. The dates and locations are below and the link to the registration is http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Mega-Regionals-2014-2015#

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LD 1422 Webinar

May 12, 2014

MAAI webinar, May 7

The third of a series of four webinars for the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative was held on Wednesday, May 7, entitled “LD 1422: digging deeper into the new Proficiency expectations for Maine’s schools and Arts classrooms”. In coming up with this particular webinar, facilitators Catherine Ring and Rob Westerberg were reacting to what they both believed has been a lot of misunderstanding and a great lack of clarity around the new law which states that all High Schools will be issuing diplomas, “based on student demonstration of proficiency”. The hour with nearly 20 attendees, including the Maine Department of Education new Visual and Performing Arts Specialist, Mr. Kevin Facer, allowed the opportunity to de-mystify it, and to discuss its ramifications as it pertains to Visual and Performing Arts.

The first part gave an overview of LD 1422, with links to valuable resources at the Maine Department of Education. Catherine and Rob went through the important details pertaining to how it relates to VPA, the Maine Guiding Principles which all students will be required to meet, and a few thoughts around the concept of “multiple pathways” to demonstrate proficiency. An extended conversation was had around proficiency in the arts and what that actually can mean in practice. Information very specific about what that looks like in the classroom, and articulation of the next steps for everyone to get there, regardless of where you are presently.

Finally, there was a give and take conversation around relevant questions and observations from the MAAI Teacher leaders last Summer. Some of these included, “Once established, this will inform curricular and instructional decisions?”, “How do we establish proficiencies while leaving room for creativity?”, “You cannot define proficiency until the “vagueness” is taken out of the standards… is this a road we want to go down?” and “How do we find time to do everything and teach at the same time?” Along the way, webinar attendees asked some very pointed questions as well and shared some great insights.

In debunking myths or misinterpretations, and showing how the Arts can proactively move toward proficiency, the hope is that attendees and those utilizing the archive and meeting plans can get a leg up, perhaps even on the other content areas in our own buildings, and truly be leaders as we move toward this next chapter in Maine education. In this vein, it is strongly encouraged that arts teachers spend some time viewing the archive: the live links alone will make this worth your while, while the conversations will add clarity for what is expected of arts teachers in the months and years to come.

On Wednesday, June 4, we will be holding a related webinar, featuring the ongoing work MAAI has undertaken creating a rich Resource Bank for the Visual and Performing Arts. Please plan on joining Catherine and Rob from 3:30 to 4:30 on that first Wednesday of June. In the meantime, you can access the archive of the May 7 webinar at http://stateofmaine.adobeconnect.com/maaimay2014/. You can access the professional development meeting plans that accompany the webinar at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Webinars (available tomorrow). You may utilize with this with your building and district VPA colleagues.

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Maine Arts Assessment Initiative Webinars

February 25, 2014

Webinar series starts Wednesday, March 5

Arts educators Rob Westerberg and Catherine Ring will be hosting the first webinar in a series of four during the next four months. This is the second series offered through the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI).  The webinar:

Outreach and Arts Education Leadership

 Wednesday, March 5, 2014

3:30 – 4:30

Primary discussions will be based around:

  • Why are outreach and leadership essential to the success of visual and performing arts in the 21st century?
  • How has the Maine Arts Assessment initiative worked to developed both?
  • What does “leadership” look like in the Arts?
  • What is outreach as it pertains to Arts Assessment and Leadership?

As the Maine Arts Assessment continues in its third year, both of these topics have been focal points. Engaging participants in dialogue around these, and discovering how they can better engage both elements themselves will be takeaways from this webinar.

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Please be sure to join them for what promises to be an engaging, insightful hour on the topic that will continue to impact every one of us as arts educators in the state of Maine!

Watch the blog and the Maine Arts Education list-serv during the next week for the details to learn how to join the webinar.

Future webinars are scheduled for April 8, May 7, and June 4. One contact hour is available to participants. All webinars will be archived if you can not be present for the live webinar.

MAAI is an initiative of the Maine Department of Education with contributing partners: Maine Arts Commission, Maine Art Education Association, Maine Music Educators Association, New England Institute for Teacher Education, University of Southern Maine, Maine Learning Technology Initiative, and the Maine Alliance for Arts and Education.

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