Posts Tagged ‘Maine Arts Commission’

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POL on MPBN

November 17, 2018

Sunday November 18, 2:00 p.m.

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Dance for Joy

November 9, 2018

What fun

Amber Pendleton, grade 6, Prescott Memorial School, Washington

This collage was created by Amber Pendleton who was in 5th grade at the time when Teaching Artist Chrissy Fowler provided a dance residency at Prescott Memorial School in Washington. She was working with art teacher Anthony Lufkin and a Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader (MAL) in a Gifted and Talented art class. This was Amber’s response to the fabulous opportunity. The residency took place with funding from the Maine Arts Commission Dance Education fund. This fund was established by a MALI dance teacher at Thornton Academy, Emma Arenstam Campbell. If you’re interested in bringing dance education to your school please watch for the information coming soon on this blog for the 2019-20 school year. The dance performance that has provided the funding for this grant will take place at Thornton Academy on Friday, November 16, 6:30 p.m. Only dance educators on the Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artist Roster are eligible for the funding. Please consider reaching out to one of them and begin planning for next year. This funding has been in place for three years and hundreds of students in grades Pre-K through 12 throughout Maine have benefited from the opportunities it has afforded. If you have questions please don’t hesitate to contact me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Maranacook Middle School

November 8, 2018

The Labor Mural

Best known as the Labor Mural, artwork created by Judy Taylor, now hangs in the entrance to the Maine State Museum in Augusta. Dan Holman, a team leader for the Acadia Team at Maranacook Middle School applied for the Maine Arts Commission Ticket to Ride funds for a trip to the State Museum. After reviewing the application I was curious about the trip and the details of the lesson/unit.

Dan worked with Joanna Torow the Chief Educator at the Maine State Museum to design a field trip that would coincide with the studies back at school. They took a deep dive look at the meaning behind each of the murals panels.

BACKGROUND

The museum has been working with outside contractors to create a digital kiosk that will allow visitors to have a more in-depth interpretive experience in regards to the mural using additional museum objects, photographs, documents, and oral history. They are interviewing the artist, Judy Taylor, and will include a video of her talking about her process and goals for creating the work.  Through this work, the curator and the museum’s educators have made more connections to the artwork and the exhibits on display, it is these insights they hope to share with the students visiting.

IN PREPARATION

To prepare of the trip, the students read short essays (200 words or less) they have written about each panel. They were excited to hear their personal thoughts on the panel, as an artwork with a very specific goal and as a historic document.

Museum Curator of Historical Collections, Angela Goebel-Bain and Joanna lead a discussion with the students (based on discussion and emails with Dan Holman) in front of the Maine Labor Murals. They talked about the subjects as well as the choices the artist made in what she included in each panel, what she left out, how she choose to depict the subject, tools, and people, and how she deliberately used the foreground and background to extend the storytelling.

BACK AT SCHOOL

Dan plans to have the students work on an journal activity in response to the mural after the discussion at the mural. The students will also be took part in two 30 minute gallery programs focused on either Ice Harvesting, Granite Quarrying, Logging & Lumbering, and a guided tour of the Made in Maine exhibit (19th century work and life in Maine with a focus on textile productions and waterpower).

The mural provides first hand knowledge from an artists’ perspective of so much history – granite quarrying, textile industry, child labor, and wood industry all included images in the mural. It provides the opportunity for the educators – museum and school – to reinforce student learning.

If you’d like to learn more about the museum programs please contact Joanna Torow. If you’d like to learn more about the unit that is underway please contact Dan Holman. Thank you to both for providing information for this blog post and the opportunity to be at the museum during the presentation.

The Maine Arts Commission Ticket to Ride program provides funding to defray the cost of travel for Maine schools wishing to visit Maine arts based venues and events as part of a well-rounded curriculum. The goals of the trip should support student learning and be aligned with the Maine Learning Results Visual and/or Performing Arts standards. Any PK-12 school in Maine with a documented free and reduced lunch student population between 30 and 49 percent is eligible to receive support of up to $300 each school year. Any PK-12 school in Maine with a documented free and reduced lunch student population of 50 percent or greater is eligible to receive support of up to $500 each school year. Applications are accepted throughout the year and funding will be made available approximately one month after they are submitted. Schools may apply more than once a year as long as they are applying to attend a different event, bringing a different student population or have not expended their eligible amount. 

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Retired Arts Educators

November 5, 2018

Gone but not forgotten

Retired music educator Paul Greenstone assisting in a summer music program in Lake Region Summer Band Program for students entering Gr. 5 through high school. Shirts designed by Paul’s son, Andrew Greenstone. Photo by music educator Jenni Null who is recently retired and teaching one day a week.

As we know the field of education is changing right before our eyes – sometimes with us at the table and some days we wake up and wonder how we got where we are. Some of this has to do with a generation of educators retiring. The numbers are on the increase and the list of openings at this time of year is larger than normal, according to communications. The statewide census that the Maine Arts Commission conducted provided us with all kinds of information including the number of school districts who have non-certified educators. We also know that in some arts disciplines, the number of undergraduate students in our field is smaller this year. Both of these are concerns.

I keep thinking about the number of retired teachers who still have so much to offer. I’m hearing about several who are teaching one or two days a week in schools that have a need for a part-time arts educator. I’m also aware of educators who are volunteering in their communities and/or schools to help support the education of young people. If you’re one of these educators, THANK YOU you for stepping up and continuing to use your teaching skills!

Doesn’t matter what age you are or how long you’ve been teaching, I suggest that you consider who is available to assist you and consider the many retired arts educators when you hear of opportunities. Both the Maine Music Educators Association and the Maine Art Education Association knows who has retired in the past few years plus I have blogged about the retirees for the last five years. Don’t hesitate to reach out – these are ways to advocate and gain support for yourself and your program. We know that young people are the ones who will benefit!

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The Harlow

November 1, 2018

“A Nation of Immigrants: Home Lost, Home Found”

This will be an exhibit you won’t want to miss. Included in the show is collaborative work by Cony High School students and Kents Hill students.

When: On view November 2-24, 2018. Opening Saturday, November 3, 5-7pm.
Where: The Harlow, 100 Water Street, Hallowell, ME 04347
Contact: Allison McKeen, Marketing Manager, 207-622-3813, harlowgallery@gmail.com

Helene Farrar, “Steady Ground:  What We Carry Series”

HALLOWELL, MAINE — The Harlow, in partnership with the Capital Area New Mainers Project (CANMP), presents “A Nation of Immigrants: Home Lost, Home Found.” The exhibition is on view November 2-24, 2018 at 100 Water Street in Hallowell with an opening reception on Saturday, November 3, 5-7pm. This is a raw and fraught time in the world as we struggle to respond to the fact that 65 million people have been displaced from their homes. What is the experience of those newly arrived and those who may have come long ago? What is has been gained, what has been lost? What does it mean to be a “Nation of Immigrants”?

Participating artists are listed alphabetically by town as follows:

Mirlea Saks, “Family Reunion”

Augusta: Fatimah Halwah, Mohammed Halwah, Jason Morgan, collaborative artwork by Cony High School Students.
Brooks: Lesia Sochor
Falmouth: Mirlea Saks
Farmingdale: Barbara Loken, Pasang Tsering
Garland: Jeanne Finley
Hallowell: Chris Cart, Ellen Freed
Hartland: Arend Thibodeau
Kents Hill: Taya Brown, Megan Czerwinski, Nevin Sabatini, Jerry Widodo, Siyin Yan, Xia Zuyao
Manchester: Helene Farrar
Portland: Rabee Kiwan
West Gardiner: Kay Morris

A Nation of Immigrants: Home Lost, Home Found is sponsored by Carol Gilbert-Tondreau & Ameriprise and Walt McKee.

The Harlow is a membership based 501(c)3 nonprofit dedicated to connecting and celebrating art, artists and community in downtown historic Hallowell since 1963. Exhibitions are always free and open to the public. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday noon-6pm. For more information please visit harlowgallery.org or call 207-622-3813.

The Harlow is supported by Camden National Bank, the City of Hallowell, Kennebec Savings Bank, The Liberal Cup and The Maine House, the Roxanne Quimby Foundation and by our members. Season Sponsors for 2018 are Book Orchard Press, Capitol Dental Care, Chris Walters Productions, Great Gatherings, Doug & Melinda Jennings, Eaton Peabody Attorneys at Law, Scrummy Afters Candy Shoppe, Slates Restaurant and Target Electric Corporation. Programming is funded in part by a Partnership Grant from the Maine Arts Commission, an independent state agency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Maine Arts Awards

October 30, 2018

First ever presented

One of the highlights of the Maine International Conference on the Arts held in September at USM was the presentation of the Maine Arts Awards by Arts EngageME. This is the first time these awards have been presented in Maine. Arts EngageME is an advocacy and support organization for the Maine Arts Commission. It is modeled on the support organizations for many of Maine’s other state cultural agencies, with a directive to increase the Commission’s capacity to advocate and to hold an endowment in support of Maine’s cultural sector.

Emily Isaacson | Artist of the Year presented her award with Severin Beliveau, Larry Rubenstein, and Julie Richard

MAINE ARTS AWARDEES

  • Emily Isaacson – Artist of the Year
  • 240 Strings – Arts Education Association
  • Rangeley Friends of the Arts – Rural Arts
  • Schoodic Arts for All – Community Organization
  • Alan & Lorna Crichton – Philanthropy
  • Bill Raiten – Lifetime Achievement

VIDEO ABOUT EACH AWARDEE

These videos were created by Maine Arts Commission Marketing & Communications Director, Ryan Leighton and they are MARVELOUS!

Bill Raiten with Ryan Leighton

ARTIST OF THE YEAR

240 STRINGS

RURAL ARTS

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION

PHILANTHROPY

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

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Kate Smith

October 17, 2018

Receiving her Carol Trimble Award

If you missed yesterday’s blog post I hope you’ll go back and read about Kate Smith and her recent honor receiving the Carol Trimble Award for her work with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. Below are some photos taken by Lindsay Pinchbeck at the very moment Kate was surprised! And a photo of Kate back at Central School with some of her third grade students and her certificate. On the screen behind is a photo of the Lanternfest that Kate works on with her community.

Kate with one of her third grade classes with her Carol Trimble award.

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