Posts Tagged ‘Maine Teacher of the Year’

h1

Invite a Legislator to School Month

January 15, 2019

Every teacher in Maine

The message below is from Maine Teachers of the Year, Shelly Moody (2011) and Kaitlin Young (2018). They’re following through with an initiative that Kevin Grover started before he died in 2012.

Kevin at the surprise announcement for the 2010 Maine Teacher of the Year.

Many of you may not have had the pleasure of meeting Kevin Grover, our 2010 Maine Teacher of the Year. Kevin made a connection with every person who was fortunate to cross his path. He had a deep commitment and love of teaching that inspired all of us who were blessed to know him.

Kevin created “Bring Your Legislator to School Week” with a goal of engaging, enlightening and informing policy makers from our local or state government. His intent was to provide school board members and legislators with a better understanding of how their decisions affect learners and educators across the state of Maine. In 2013, Representative Mary Nelson of Falmouth and Educate Maine moved forward with Kevin’s vision by sponsoring LD 822 in his honor.

Although it has been almost 6 years since LD822 established January as Invite Your Legislator to School Month, the Maine State Teacher of the Year Association believes that that it’s time for us to return to Kevin’s vision.  Our goal is to begin an annual tradition of inviting stakeholders into our schools to meet with teachers, administrators, and students. It is our hope that this experience will strengthen the relationships between all parties, promote increased knowledge, and initiate productive conversation surrounding prekindergarten to grade twelve public education programs.

The following is an excerpt from a letter Kevin sent to his colleagues regarding his idea:

Yes, that’s Grover in the photo with Kevin and Vice-President Joe Biden during a visit to Washington, D.C. as the 2010 Maine Teacher of the Year.

I propose that teachers contact local town councilors, school board members, state representatives and federal representatives. Elected officials should be invited to spend at least one hour in a classroom helping and/or observing. It is not a time for a panel discussion, whole school assemblies in honor of prestigious guests or catered lunches, it is time for sitting in on a math lesson, reading to students, or joining teachers on their 20 minute lunch break at the photocopier. It is time for a dose of reality.

Let’s join together and start 2019 by building bridges with the decision makers who impact our students and schools!

For more information, please visit our Invite Your Legislator to School Month collection of resources and/or resources from our session presentations at ECET2ME and MEA Fall Conference! CLICK HERE to find your Senator or Representative. 

h1

Story Slam

October 25, 2018

Congratulations Kaitlin

The story tellers at Sweet Tree Arts fund raiser at the end of an amazing evening of stories.

Laughter, tears, surprise, wonder – all emotions I felt last Friday night at the Sweet Tree Story Slam. How I got here was the theme provided by Lindsay Pinchbeck, founder and director of Sweet Tree Arts Center and Sweetland School in Hope. Each story was amazing and had the 100 or so folks in attendance sitting at the edge of their chairs. Our own Kaitlin Young, music teacher from Sedomocha School in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Teacher Leader, and Maine’s 2018 Teacher of the Year was amazing as she shared her story of an amazing year.

The event was held in the barn at Hope Orchards – a cozy spot to spend a Friday night after a long and busy week. The tasting of apples, eating and drinking of apple cider and pie topped off the night. The story slam was a fund raiser for the greenhouse that the school is purchasing. If you’d like to contribute contact Lindsay at sweettreearts@gmail.com.

If you’re considering holding a Story Slam with your students or perhaps for a fund raiser go ahead, don’t hesitate – its a great opportunity for learners of all ages. Not to mention a great way to bring community together around a topic on a cozy Friday night!

h1

Mr. Hennessey Named TOY

October 24, 2018

Maine Teacher of the Year

I’ve been fortunate to attend many of the gatherings naming the Maine Teacher of the Year. I traveled to Piscataquis Community High School in the middle of October for the formal announcement of Joseph Hennessey, an English teacher. The school student body, teachers, and community are proud of Joe and excited about the next several months and what he will experience.

I’m sure you share in my pride of having a music educator representing educators during 2018. Kaitlin Young from Sedomocha School in Dover-Foxcroft continues being an amazing ambassador! In spite of her responsibilities out of the classroom she has continued to learn and grow as a teacher for her students and school community. The opportunity became clear as I listened to her during formal presentations at two conferences earlier this month.

The Maine Teacher of the Year represents all that is good and right in education – they are not THE best teacher but they are exemplary and provide their voice and represent educators in Maine and throughout the country during their “year” as Teacher of the Year.

I was very inspired by Mr. Hennessey’s “thank you” at the school assembly and have printed it below. You can read more in the Bangor Daily News article from October 13-14, 2018.

“This process began last February when I was notified of my nomination for the Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year, which was humbling in itself,” he said. “There are many talented people working very hard in this part of the state who never received that recognition, and there was much for me to process as a result.

“By the time I was selected as the 2018 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year I had written four essays expounding the virtues of my colleagues, the commitment of our community to its young people, and the tremendous efforts of my students to better themselves through close writing and critical thinking.

“I had also solicited numerous letters of recommendation from colleagues, community members and students on my behalf. All of which further introduced the selection committee to what makes our community strong in the face of often adverse circumstances. Life in rural America can be hard, but evidently you are all people who choose to rise to those challenges as they come.”

Hennessey said as a semifinalist, “I had offered the committee a window into my classroom where your efforts were on display and I acted as a guide. It was nothing more or less than what we undertake every day and every class period across every subject, and as a result of that window I was able to give a presentation at the University of Maine which discussed chronic absenteeism and highlighted some of the programs this school offers to try address that issue.

“Whether it is offering after-school RTI or giving students rides home, partnering with Tri-County Technical Center to help students position themselves for career success, or implementing a student success team or academic council, my message was the adults here are committed to your individual and collective success. Apparently the selection committee was moved by our situation.

“By the time I was selected as a finalist for the Maine Teacher of the Year, the selection committee wanted to visit our school to better understand what it is about this community that places someone like me in a position to succeed. Furthermore I interviewed with various stakeholders at the department of education to express my views on education, my philosophical tenets, and my personal and professional commitments, all of which are informed by working with all of you every day. We live and we learn together.

“Today after all of the reading and the writing, the speaking, and the reflecting, I find myself named as the 2019 Maine Teacher of the Year as an English literature teacher from Piscataquis Community High School in Guilford, Maine. It is an honor that I will cherish for the rest of my career and beyond. But I cannot overemphasize that I am in this position of distinction because of this community. Thus I think the question of what makes this community special is an ongoing point of reflection. What does this recognition mean for us now, and what does it mean for the future?

“Over the coming year I will have the ability to share with others what we have to offer and vice-versa. So what are the things that make us most proud; what barriers to access and success frustrate us the most; and how is it that people coming from six different towns representing a physical area bigger than downtown Portland are able to come together to create a community where everyone is welcome, supported, and feels as though their opinions and actions matter? Those are some of the tasks that we have before us, and I am honored and humbled to have this opportunity to articulate to others through this platform.

“In closing I would like to thank all of you, my colleagues, community members, the selection committee and most of all the students for taking a chance on someone from away. Though you had every right to be skeptical of me because I am a person from a different part of the country, instead you chose to welcome me, my monotone voice, my limited facial expressions, my scribbled handwriting and my dry sense of humor into your community with open arms. I am very glad that you did.”

h1

MALI Teacher Leader Story: Kaitlin Young

June 5, 2018

Music Educator

This is one of several blog posts in 2018 that include stories of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Phase 7 Teacher Leaders and Teaching Artist Leaders. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about each leader. CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 93 Teacher Leaders and 8 Teaching Artist Leaders.  CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE  for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. Thank you Kaitlin for sharing your story!

Kaitlin Young has taught music within the RSU 68 school district in Dover-Foxcroft, Me. for the last eight years. Currently she teaches music to students in prekindergarten through fourth grade at SeDoMoCha Elementary School. She is also the choral director of the SeDoMoCha Singers at SeDoMoCha Middle School. Kaitlin is the 2017 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year, and the 2018 Maine Teacher of the Year.

What do you like best about being a music educator?

Music is pretty cool. I love that I have the unique pleasure of providing experiences for my students that are at times indescribable through words. I love to watch their faces when they hear something they have never heard before, or even better hear something they know and love in a new way. Moments when they laugh uncontrollably at a silly song, tear up as they connect to a piece of classical music, or beam with pride when they have created something uniquely their own.

I love that I get to share in these experiences that elicit strong emotional connections through music with my students. I love that I get to bring joy through song and movement, and that in my classroom kids get to be kids. Wonder and awe are essential to the human experience.

I love that music education provides students an outlet to express themselves as well as a way to connect to their community both locally and globally. I love that as an educator, regardless of content, what we do is about fostering relationships. I love that I get to build these relationships over several years and experience all of these moments of joy with my students.  We are engaged in this journey together.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

First, always keep an open mind.

No matter what role we hold within a Visual and Performing Arts program, (student, teacher, administrator, community member, etc.) it is essential that we continue to be open to possibilities. Whether it be growth and learning, actively sharing and listening to others ideas, thinking creatively about solving a problem, or simply being willing to try something new. Our ability to capitalize on those unexpected teachable moments will help us continue to engage others within our programs and help them to reflect our communities.

Second, build trusting relationships.

Relationships are the foundation of a strong education, and are essential to the human experience. We learn the most from people we trust and respect. The arts innately foster empathy, connections, and community. As a valued colleague once told me, “the arts bring people together.”

Third, be willing to persist and advocate for what you love!

We must set goals with our students and colleagues and actively pursue them even when the going gets tough. Advocacy is sharing what we love on behalf of those we love. And one of the best ways to advocate is empowering our students to find their voices and advocate for their future.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Assessments are a tool to help us to know where we are, where we are going, and clarify how we might need to get there. Once I grasped the concept that assessments could be informative and diagnostic (which felt much different from when I was in school!) it changed the way I viewed learning the learning process. I love being able to use consistent language to identify the skills necessary to help my students develop and grow into strong musicians. Assessment provides the opportunity to improve feedback and promote positive conversation surrounding learning goals and growth for both students and teachers!

Utilizing assessments to share what students need to know and be able to do to demonstrate their learning has allowed students to take control. Assessment has also helped us to advocate within our school community as we challenge the belief that music education is just for the talented few.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership initiative?

Working with such an inspiring and passionate group of educators brings out the best in everyone! Whether it is the facilitated discussions within professional development sessions, informal conversation surrounding our craft at lunch, or follow up phone calls/zoom meetings with friends I always leave feeling uplifted, supported, and encouraged to challenge myself to grow as a professional.

My growth throughout my teaching career has been supported through various opportunities provided by the work of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (formerly Maine Arts Assessment Initiative) and I continue to look forward to the connections that I will be able to make and the doors that may open through this continued experience.

What are you most proud of in your career?

My kids. It might sound cliche, but my husband and I do not have biological kids (yet…growth mindset!) and I love that I get to share in many special moments with all of them each and every day and over the course of many years!

I take pride in all of the small moments where they accomplish something they didn’t think was possible or when they make a fantastic connection that gives greater purpose and meaning to what they are learning. Over the last year it has brought me great joy to share their thoughts and ideas with others as I have presented at conferences as I advocate on behalf of our profession. I continue to be inspired by their words and I am proud that I get to share their ideas!

Kaitlin at the Hall of Flags in Augusta with the arts teachers honored as the 2018 county teachers of the year. (l to r) Kaitlin, Sagadahoc: Christine Del Rossi, Mt. Ararat High School, Knox: Anthony Lufkin, Friendship Village School, Prescott Memorial School, Union Elementary, and Waldo: David Coffey, Belfast Area High School and Troy Howard Middle School

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

Paperwork, pressure, and misperceptions oh my! While I am a strong advocate for assessment and high quality education I do agree that often times I can get caught up in the administrative aspects of my job. In a time of “evaluation and accountability” there can be intense pressure to justify your worth, or the worth of your program, based on the misperception of what music education is or “should be,” not upon what we know, as professionals, to be best for our students. Music education, and what music classes might look like, continue to evolve. We have, hopefully, moved further away from some of the sit and get or “mouth the words” experiences that others have had. It can be hard to alter or influence the expectations of those who may have had a poor music experience, do not understand, or simply do not value what it is that we do. That can lead to logistical challenges including itinerant or unrealistic schedules, a less than ideal physical work environment (like being on a cart!), or unsupportive administrators and/or communities. However the need to understand and explain (often way more than we would like) the importance of what we are teaching and why we are teaching it sets us up to be some of the most reflective and effective advocates for our students!

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Take the advice that you give to your students each and every day in your classrooms.  Actively listen. Be reflective and patient. Play nice with others. Dream big, think different, work hard, and be kind.

On a recent trip to Washington, D.C. representing Maine as the 2018 Teacher of the Year Kaitlin takes the opportunity to have a conversation with Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

I would love to start a scholarship for my students to have the opportunity to travel to explore musical opportunities/experiences beyond our local and state community on a consistent basis. I would also like to take my husband on a road trip across our country, specifically to see all of the National Parks. His affinity and admiration for the beauty that simply exists through nature always inspires me to pause and appreciate the small moments.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

I wish I would have been more diligent about writing down the small special moments from the classroom during the beginning of my career. Mostly because my memory is not what it used to be, but also because in education it is the small moments that fill up our buckets. That’s what I will look back upon and smile about the most!

Thank you Kaitlin for representing Maine educators as our 2018 Maine State Teacher of the Year. 

h1

Soooo Proud!

May 11, 2018

Great day for Maine Arts Education

Yesterday in Augusta at a Hall of Flags ceremony in the State House the 2018 County Teachers of the Year were announced. Among the group were 3 arts teachers out of 16! How cool is that – 2 visual art teachers and 1 music teacher. The Arts are well represented and we as arts educators have so much to be proud of. There were 350 teachers nominated statewide. Please join me in CONGRATULATING the following arts educators.

Anthony Lufkin

KNOX COUNTY

Anthony Lufkin – elementary visual art educator
Friendship Village School, Prescott Memorial School and Union Elementary

SAGADAHOC COUNTY

Christine Del Rossi – high school visual art educator

Mt. Ararat High School
WALDO COUNTY
David Coffey – high school music educator
Belfast Area High School and Troy Howard Middle School
I’m so proud to know these teachers. All three have taken leadership roles. Anthony has worked closely with MALI teaching artist leader Tim Christensen. David is a MALI Teacher Leader joining the initiative in August 2017. Christine has been on the MAEA board member for several years.

David Coffey with his students at Point Lookout to perform at the Maine Arts Commission Arts and Prosperity report luncheon in February 2018

WABI TV5 was there covering the event which you can view HERE. The 2018 Maine State Teacher of the Year, music educator Kaitlin Young, from SeDoMoCha School in Dover Foxcroft was there to to congratulate the educators and is on the TV clip. Kaitlin is a wonderful ambassador for all Maine teachers. Recently she traveled to Washington D.C. to meet the other state Teachers of the Year and for a ceremony in the Rose Garden at the White House. Thank you Kaitlin for representing all of us! So proud of you!

The rest of the 2018 County Teaches of the Year include:
Androscoggin: Katie Toothaker, Minot Consolidated School
Aroostook: William “Bill” Guerrette, Presque Isle Middle School
Cumberland: Connie Russell, Mabel I. Wilson School
Franklin: Jessica Ellingwood, Spruce Mountain High School
Hancock: Jennifer Farnham, Hancock Grammar School
Kennebec: Katy Jones, Winslow Junior High School
Lincoln: Daniel Hupp, Great Salt Bay Community School
Oxford: Jessica McGreevy, Oxford Hills Middle School
Penobscot: Shana Goodall, Orono High School
Piscataquis: Joseph Hennessey, Piscataquis Community High School
Somerset: Patti Champagne, Bloomfield Elementary
Washington: Kailee Colbeth, Washington Academy
York: Kristin Klin, Bonny Eagle Middle School
One of the 16 county teachers of the year will become the 2019 Maine Teacher of the Year. Wouldn’t it be great if Kaitlin was followed by another visual or performing arts educator?!
h1

Maine Teacher of the Year

January 24, 2018

Nominations sought for 2019 Teacher of the Year

AUGUSTA – Nominations are now open for the 2018 County Teachers of the Year and 2019 Teacher of the Year.

Members of the public are encouraged to nominate educators who demonstrate a commitment to excellence and nurturing the achievement of all students at http://www.mainetoy.org through Feb. 5.

To be considered, a teacher must: hold the appropriate professional certification for the position, be employed by a Maine public school – including a public charter school or publicly supported secondary school, be actively teaching students at least 50% of full-time at the time of nomination and during the year of service and have minimum of five years teaching.

The eventual winner of the state’s highest teaching honor, which is awarded by the Maine Department of Education through a program administered by Educate Maine, serves as an advocate for teachers, students and the efforts underway in Maine’s public schools to prepare students for success in college, career and civic life.

Maine’s 2018 Teacher of the Year, Kaitlin Young, a music and choral teacher at SeDoMoCha School in Dover-Foxcroft, was selected from over 300 entries and included recognition as the 2017 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year.  In addition to Young, the other 2018 state finalists include Kasie Giallombardo, Nokomis High School and 2017 Penobscot County Teacher of the Year, and Jen England, Noble High School and 2017 York County Teacher of the Year.

The 2019 Maine Teacher of the Year will be selected from the 16 county honorees. The field will be narrowed to eight semi-finalists and then three state finalists before the ultimate winner is announced by Maine’s Education Commissioner at a surprise school assembly in the fall.

Maine Teacher of the Year is a program of the Maine DOE that since 2013 has been administered by Educate Maine, a business-led organization whose mission is to champion college, career readiness and increased education attainment. Funding is provided by Bangor Savings Bank, Dead River Co., Geiger, Hannaford, the Maine Lottery and Thomas College with support from the State Board of Education and the Maine State Teacher of the Year Association.

The Teacher of the Year program has no cost to taxpayers. Bangor Savings Bank reimburses the winning educator’s school district for the cost of substitutes while the Teacher of the Year is out of the classroom on their official duties, which includes travel throughout the state, a week at NASA Space Camp and a visit to the White House.

For more information about the Maine Teacher of the Year program, visit www.maine.gov/doe/toy/. For more information about Educate Maine, visit www.educatemaine.org.

h1

Congrats Kaitlin!

August 24, 2017

Finalist for Maine Teacher of the Year

We learned yesterday that SeDoMoCha Elementary School Music Educator and Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Teacher Leader Kaitlin Young is one of three finalists for the 2018 Maine State Teacher of the Year (TOY). Kaitlin teaches PK-8 music in the Dover-Foxcroft school. At a ceremony at the State House in Augusta in May, Kaitlin was honored as the 2017 Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year. The last two months have been busy for Kaitlin as the TOY process continued. It is so great to have Kaitlin representing her school and visual and performing arts educators from across Maine.

Kaitlin recently completed a Master of Music Education, concentration in Kodaly Pedagogy, from the Hartt School, Hartford, CT. She received her Bachelor of Music in Music Education, from the University of Maine at Orono in 2010.

Kaitlin and MALI colleague Kris Bisson, Marshwood Middle School music educator, at the summer institute. Both Kaitlin and Kris recently completed their master’s degrees. Congrats!

Kaitlin’s principal, Julie Kimball said:

Kaitlin has an incredible passion for teaching music. Our elementary and middle school concerts have grown in such size that we have outgrown our building and need to hold them at our local high school. Her ability to connect with our community members during these events is fun to watch. At the end of each concert, she has an activity that involves audience members of all ages.

Kaitlin is a true leader when it comes to advocating for her fellow peers. She leads our unified arts team and is a member of our teacher evaluation team.

Even more spectacular than our incredible concerts is Kaitlin’s passion for educating students and their families. Her energy is infectious! Thanks to Kaitlin’s desire to educate her fellow colleagues as well as our families about our music program, we are shifting to informances in addition to our traditional concerts. Her informances will offer families the ability to see what their child is learning during music classes by having opportunities for families to come to school and take part in a music class with their child.” 

Joining Kaitlin as finalists are Kasie Giallombardo from Nokomis Regional High School, Penobscot County  and Jen England from Noble High School, York County. Congratulations to all three finalists.

YAHOOOOOOOO Kaitlin! I am sure that visual and performing arts educators join me from across the state wishing you the best of luck as you continue on your Teacher of the Year pathway!

Kaitlin learning the technique of sgraffito on clay at the MALI summer institute

h1

Maine County Teachers of the Year

May 15, 2017

Congratulations Chris and Kaitlin

Kaitlin Young, Argy Nestor – Photo by Andy Forster, 2016 Kennebec County Teacher of the year.

I felt so proud attending the Maine Teacher of the Year celebration last week in the Hall of Flags at the State House in Augusta. Sixteen teachers were named County Teachers of the Year representing each of our 16 Maine counties and they will be considered for the 2018 Maine State Teacher of the Year. There were 370 teachers nominated this year.

There are two arts teachers honored this year. Piscataquis County Teacher of the Year is Kaitlin Young of SeDoMoCha Elementary School. Kaitlin teaches PreK-8 music at the school in Dover-Foxcroft. And, Chris Goosman is Waldo County Teacher of the Year.

Center, Chris Goosman

She teaches theatre and social studies at Searsport High School.

Also attending the ceremony was Messalonskee music educator, Andy Forster, the 2016 Kennebec Teacher of the Year. We were both so proud of both Kaitlin and Chris representing Maine teachers and especially arts education!

Kaitlin’s nomination included: “Kaitlin has grown the music program exponentially during her six years at the school. She works tirelessly teaching students to love, respect, and learn from music.” You can read more about Kaitlin by CLICKING HERE.

Chris’ nomination included: “Chris is kind and caring to all students. She is patient with every student and always takes the extra time to help students truly understand what they are being taught. She views every student as a unique individual.”

Below is the list of the teachers representing each county.

2017 County Teachers of the Year:

  • Androscoggin: Nesrene Griffin, Governor James Longley School
  • Aroostook: Leslie Marquis, Fort Kent Community School
  • Cumberland: Brooke Teller, Casco Bay High School
  • Franklin: Allison Warman, Rangeley Lakes School
  • Hancock: Marielle Edgecomb, The Peninsula School
  • Kennebec: Lisette Bordes, Messalonskee High School
  • Knox: Iris Eichenlaub, Camden Hills Regional High School
  • Lincoln: Christopher Coleman, Great Salt Bay Community School
  • Oxford: Janet Harriman, Sacopee Valley High School
  • Penobscot: Kasie Giallombardo, Nokomis High School
  • Piscataquis: Kaitlin Young, SeDoMoCha Elementary School
  • Sagadahoc: John Dever, Mt. Ararat High School
  • Somerset: Eric Brown, Lawrence High School
  • Waldo: Christi Goosman, Searsport District High School
  • Washington: Rhonda Stevens, Beatrice Rafferty School
  • York: Jen England, Noble High School

Good luck to all of the county teachers of the year as they move to the next step in the state teacher of the year process and especially to Kaitlin and Chris!

 

h1

Maine Teacher of the Year

January 27, 2017

Nominate someone you know

I am proud to know that year after year visual and performing arts teachers have been nominated for the Maine Teacher of the Year. Applications are being accepted for the 2018 Teacher of the Year and I am sure that arts educators names will be among the nominations. Music  teacher Andrew Forster from Messalonskee High School is the 2016 Kennebec County Teacher of the Year. The Teacher of the Year information is below – please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions about the program.

screen-shot-2017-01-26-at-7-37-01-am

Do you know a great teacher? Someone who inspires students? A teacher who is a leader in the profession and deserves recognition for their great work with students? Here is your chance to nominate him/her for County Teacher of the Year!

Who can nominate a teacher?
Teachers may be nominated by students, parents, teaching colleagues, principals, superintendents or anyone from the community who has an interest in honoring an outstanding educator. To recognize a teacher’s role in engaging his/her students positively to improve student achievement click below to nominate.

Please submit your nomination by 5:00 pm on February 6, 2017 – CLICK HERE for the nomination information.

screen-shot-2017-01-26-at-7-42-38-amAbout the Teacher of the Year Program
The Maine Teacher of the Year Program starts with your nomination! From the nominees, one exemplary teacher from each of the 16 Maine counties will be selected as the 2017 Maine County Teacher of the Year. From the 16 County Teachers of the Year, 8 semi-finalists are selected. The field is narrowed to 3 state finalists, one of whom will be announced as the 2018 Maine State Teacher of the Year at a surprise school assembly in the fall of 2017. The Maine State Teacher of the Year represents Maine at the national level and becomes eligible for the National Teacher of the Year award.

h1

In Today’s News

June 24, 2016

YAY for Andy!

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 1.01.21 PM

Andrew Forster

Andy Forster was nominated for Maine Teacher of the Year by his principal Jon Moody who said: “When I first met Andy as a colleague in 2001, it was immediately apparent to me that he is a one of a kind human being. Andy cares deeply for his students and puts in the time necessary to ensure that all of them (including those not enrolled in his classes) are touched by music and given the chance to shine at Messalonskee.”

The Maine Department of Education in partnership with Educate Maine, is pleased to announce eight teachers as semifinalists for Maine’s 2017 Teacher of the Year. They were chosen from the 2016 County Teachers of the Year, who were honored in May at a celebration held in Augusta.

The semifinalists are:

  • Aroostook: Michael McCartney, Maine School of Science and Mathematics, Limestone
    McCartney has been teaching for ten years and currently teaches English, fitness, history, and first-year seminar to grades 9-12.
  • Cumberland: Morgan Cuthbert, Harrison Middle School, Yarmouth
    Cuthbert has been an educator for 15 years and currently teaches seventh grade math and science.
  • Franklin: Selina Warren, Kingfield Elementary School, Kingfield
    Warren has been teaching for six years and teaches second grade.
  • Hancock: Rebecca Tapley, Brooklin Elementary School, Brooklin
    Tapley has been teaching for 15 years and currently teaches all subjects for grades 4-8.
  • Kennebec: Andrew Forster, Messalonskee High School, Oakland
    Forster has been teaching for 27 years and currently teaches band, music production, independent study, and jazz band.
  • Knox: Beth Heidemann, Cushing Community School, Cushing
    Heidemann has been teaching for 23 years and currently teaches Kindergarten
  • Penobscot: Cherrie MacInnes, Brewer Community School, Brewer
    MacInnes has been teaching for 26 years and currently teaches third grade.
  • Somerset: Tamara Ranger, Skowhegan Area Middle School, Skowhegan                                                               Ranger has been teaching for 16 years and currently teaches English language arts to grades 7-8.

The eight semifinalists will continue in the intensive selection process which consists of a professional portfolio review and an oral presentation, before narrowing the pool to three state finalists. The finalists will then sit for a final interview and have a school-site visit before the 2017 Maine Teacher of the Year is selected.

Review panels during the selection process consist of past Teachers of the Year, school administrators, Maine DOE staff, members of professional education organizations, and the business community. The 2017 Maine Teacher of the Year will be announced at a surprise all-school assembly in October.

The Maine Teacher of the Year is a program of the Maine DOE, and is administered and managed by Educate Maine; a business-led organization whose mission is to “champion college and career readiness and to increase the education attainment of all Maine people.” The program has received longtime support from the Maine State Board of Education and the Maine State Teacher of the Year Association. An overview of the Maine Teacher of the Year program can be found here.

Funding for the program is generously provided by Hannaford, Geiger, Bangor Savings Bank and Dead River.

Full biographical information and photos of the 16 County Teachers of Year can be found here.

For more information about the Teacher of the Year program contact Program Director Dolly Sullivan at dolly@educatemaine.org or call 631-3385.

%d bloggers like this: