Posts Tagged ‘MALI’

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Teaching Artists Residencies During Covid

February 20, 2021

Possible and yes, happening!

In December 2020 Martha Piscuskas, director of Arts Education at the Maine Arts Commission (MAC), moderated a discussion with teaching artists and a middle schooler called School Arts Residencies During COVID? Yes We Can! Included in the discussion were teaching artists: Bridget Matros, Alicia Phelps, Tim Christensen, and Dana Lagawiec with student Theo Forcier, Mt. Ararat Middle School. They discussed keys to success for remote school artist residencies and what they’re doing during the pandemic to further connections and learning opportunities for Maine learners.

The webinar was recorded and archived on YouTube and can be viewed below. The video opens with Martha sharing a land acknowledgment. Bridget Matros (starts at 4:30) is the Kids & Family Outreach Manager at Waterfall Arts and she is in the middle of a residency in Brunswick provided by the well established Arts Are Elementary program. She shares the set up in how she is teaching multiple learners in more than one space at one time. Alicia Phelps (starts at 12:00) teaches piano and voice and is Director of Community Partnerships and Special Programs at the community music center in Yarmouth, 317 Main. She is a recipient of a MAC grant. Tim is a ceramic artist (starts at 22:00) and became a Teaching Artist Leader with MAC’s Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) in Phase 6, 2016-17. Dana (starts at 31:15) does creative theater and became a Teaching Artist Leader with MALI Phase 7, 2017-18. The session finishes with circus artist MALI Phase 6, 2016-17 MALI Teaching Artist Brigid Rankowski monitoring questions. During the summer of 2020 MALI transformed into Maine Arts Education Partners in Leadership (MAEPL). Tim, Dana, Bridget, and Brigid are on the Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artist Roster.

RESOURCES FROM THE WEBINAR

MAC has the following education specific grants available with a deadline of April 1, 2021. Learn more by clicking on the grant title. Arts LearningCreative AgingDance Education. If you have any questions please contact Martha at Martha.Piscuskas@maine.gov.

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MALI Becomes MAEPL

December 8, 2020

Teacher Network Rebrands its Commitment to Arts Education

The Teacher Leader network known as MALI, or Maine Arts Leadership Initiative, has taken on the new mantle of MAEPL, Maine Arts Education Partners in Leadership, with the revised mission to develop and promote high quality arts education for all.” Leaders of MAEPL say the new name and mission statement better encapsulates what this community of arts educators has been and will continue to be. The process evolved as a result of bringing in new staff and expanding the organization’s leadership structure. Jake Sturtevant, music educator at Falmouth High School, longtime MALI member and Chair of the MAEPL Vision Team, said, “We are still committed to partnering with each other to be resilient, compassionate, and curious Teacher Leaders for our students and in our communities.”

2014 Summer MALI Institute

MALI, now MAEPL, a program of the Maine Arts Commission, is a unique teacher leader development program specifically for preK-12 visual and performing arts (VPA) educators from across the state, one of the very few in the country.  Led by active educators, they focus on the emerging needs of the field.  Components of the year-long program for both classroom teachers and teaching artists in all arts disciplines include community-building, an annual Individualized Professional Development Plan, structured mutual accountability, and leadership development. Over 120 Maine VPA teachers, as well as teaching artists, have participated in the last ten years.  

Even before the pandemic, teachers of the arts often felt isolated.  School district-level trainings are often geared towards general or “core” subject teachers.  “I’m only one of two in my district teaching elementary music.  We are in our little islands, far from anyone else doing what we do,” said Kate Smith, 2014 York County Teacher of the Year and MAEPL Program Team Leader.  “MALI changed all that.” 

Pamela Kinsey, Lori Spruce, Kate Smith, Pam Chernesky, Julie Richard, Winter Retreat 2020

This past year the group took a deep dive into their own organizational structure, assessing and clarifying their policies and processes. Even through the pandemic, the Leadership Teams met and solicited input from the entire membership, and determined a new name, a refined mission, and a new logo. “We chose the whirling maple seed pod as our new symbol because we felt it reflected the best of what we do – taking new ideas, learning and sharing together, then planting them throughout our school communities,” said Jennie Driscoll, visual art educator at Brunswick High School and Vision Team member. “It’s got our energy.”  

In 2020 they also delivered a virtual Summer Institute to 50 VPA educators, addressing the social and emotional resiliency needed this year. In addition, many members led efforts to support and connect with other teachers quickly adjusting to online instruction, leading virtual seminars through the Maine Department of Education and the Maine Arts Commission.

Group exercise at Winter Retreat, 2020

 “MALI grew a wealth of resources and committed members over the years,” said the current Director of Arts Education for the Maine Arts Commission, Martha Piscuskas, referring to the online Resource Bank and Arts Assessment Resources website, available free to all teachers. “We wanted to build on those strengths.” In addition to the professional development programs, next steps include creating an advisory council, streamlining their web presence, and continued advocacy for the sector. 

The group formed in 2010 to focus on student assessments, an emerging need for visual and performing arts teachers at that time. After learning from other states, a small group of educators led by Argy Nestor, the former Director of Arts Education at the Commission, Rob Westerberg, Choral Director at York High School, and Catherine Ring, former school administrator and art teacher, created the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative. They established the multi-day Summer Institute, sharing a framework and best practices for successful arts assessment in the classroom. “We quickly became the assessment experts in our schools,” said Sturtevant. 

Hope Lord and Adele Drake, MALI Summer Institute 2017

In 2015 the group added “teacher voice” and advocacy to their mission, becoming the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI), again addressing emerging needs of the sector. “I never would have thought to seek out leadership positions, continue my graduate studies, or have presented at conferences without the support and influence of MALI,” said Iva Damon, visual art teacher and Humanities Department Head at Leavitt Area High School.    

For more information about MAEPL, and to learn about how to get involved, contact Director of Arts Education for the Maine Arts Commission, Martha Piscuskas at martha.piscuskas@maine.gov. Arts education resources developed over the years are accessible through the Maine Arts Commission’s website, https://mainearts.maine.gov/pages/programs/maai.

The Maine Arts Commission is a state agency supporting artists, arts organizations, educators, policy makers, and community developers to advance the arts in Maine since 1966.  www.Mainearts.com


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The Poetry Place

December 7, 2020

Teaching Artist Brian Evans-Jones

Maine is fortunate to have Brian Evans-Jones as a poet and writer. He has established a unique website called The Poetry Place. What’s so interesting about it is that he offers The Poetry Parlor to offer support and an online learning environment for participants to write poetry. If you’re interested in writing poetry or perhaps you write poetry but want to learn more about writing poetry, I recommend Brian and The Poetry Place. Here are some questions (from Brian’s site) that can help you get a better idea:

  • Do you want to write better poems?
  • Do you wish you knew more about the techniques of poetry?
  • Do you need help with ideas and getting poems written?
  • Would you love to connect with like-minded poets?

There are many free resources on the site including a 30 page .pdf that you can download. It is called 8 Steps to Better Poems and is filled with a plethora of ideas and information to guide you to writing better poems. The document is broken into 3 segments: Poetry Techniques, Mastering Drafting and Your Next Steps. You can’t go wrong since the document is free! I suggest that you check it out and recommend that your colleagues and students do the same. You can also sign up for his newsletter which is filled with inspiring ideas.

LOOKING FOR INSPIRATION?

Poetry Parlor took me on a positive journey from using an existing poem as an idea to developing the first draft of my poem. The chosen poem and the discussions were inspirational in my own poetry writing.

Then, there were excellent tips on editing that helped to produce a published poem.”

— Sue B.

Brian is a teacher who is providing the motivation and guidance on an individual basis as well as providing time with others who write poetry. You can become a member of the parlor and benefit from following:

  • Getting authentic feedback and support from Brian and others
  • Learning techniques
  • Reading great poetry
  • Writing every month
  • Meeting other poets

Poetry Parlor can work for you if…

  • You have written poetry before, maybe for years, and you would like to broaden your knowledge and skills
  • You would like to learn more about the techniques and forms of poetry
  • You are looking for regular inspiration to help you create poems
  • You want to get feedback on your poems to help you improve
  • You want to know more about poetry being published now
  • You’re just starting poetry and would like some structure and guidance to help you
  • You’d like to get to know other poets in similar positions to yourself, for support, friendship, and encouragement.

ABOUT BRIAN

I was Poet Laureate of Hampshire in the UK (where I used to live) in 2012‑13, and in America I won the Maureen Egen Award from Poets & Writers in 2017. I’ve had poems published in magazines, competitions, and art events on both sides of the Atlantic. And I’ve taught at three colleges/universities, visited dozens of schools as a visiting Teaching Artist, and worked with hundreds of adult students through my own workshops and courses.

Brian coached the Maine State Poetry Out Loud (POL) champion Joao Victor before he traveled to the national competition where he finished in the top 10. Brian served as a judge for POL during 206-2018. POL is open to all Maine high school students and administered by the Maine Arts Commission (MAC). Brian is a member of the MAC Teaching Artist roster and a Teaching Artist Leader with the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) established in 2011.

If you want to learn more check out the site and contact Brian at brian@brianevansjones.com and please let him know I sent you.

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Open Art Teachers Studio: Quarantine Edition

September 30, 2020

MALI art making sessions

The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) is offering a second round of Open Art Teachers Studio: Quarantine Edition, starting October 7.  Yay!  The same MALI teacher leaders are running it, so it’ll be fun and efficient: Melanie Crowe, Iva Damon, and Bronwyn Sale. As a reminder, this is a virtual half hour of jumping right into creating together per provided prompts, followed by a half hour of discussion.

TO REGISTER CLICK HERE 

Attached is a poster with the details. Open to all at no cost. Join in on the fun – another way of knowing you’re not alone! To register/attend click above.

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Positive Outcomes

June 5, 2020

What are your thoughts and experiences?

I Invited past Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leaders and Leadership Team members to answer 4 questions – both personal and professional. Each day this week another set of answers is being posted. Today’s blog post includes answers to number 3. Please don’t hesitate to share your answers to the 4 questions. To the teachers who responded (so far. THANK YOU for your honesty and sharing your new reality. One word that came up for me as I read your responses was BRAVERY! I am grateful that you’re being brave for the learners across the state!

  1. Name one thing that has been an ‘ah-ha’ moment for you during ‘teaching away from school’? One success.
  2. What have you learned that you didn’t know before the school shut down?
  3. What are you doing to bring yourself joy/to take care of yourself?
  4. When this is all over – what do you imagine might be a positive that comes from the pandemic?

Kris Bisson says it best – YOU ALL ROCK!

The last three days blog posts have been filled with inspiration from the voices of Maine visual and performing arts educators. Today’s post is filled with HOPE. And, as we continue to deal with the biggest challenges of our lives I hope that you won’t forget the struggles that have the possibility of morphing into positives for our communities and the world. It will take all of us to continue working together and supporting one another. Thank you all for the amazing work you’re doing and for being such an inspiration to me and those who you touch in your worlds! Know that I’d love to hear your stories – please don’t hesitate to contact me at meartsed@gmail.com.

IMAGINE THE IMPACT 

  • That we will have made changes to focus on what really matters in our lives. This action will lead us to create teaching and learning environments that focus on relevance, action and compassion. ~ LINDSAY PINCHBECK
  • What scares me is that many educators, parents and administrators are saying “can’t wait to get back to normal”. All I can think about is the amazing things that we have learned to do in the past few months, how easy it is to collaborate, why push all that back into the “box” and “go back to normal”. CHARLIE JOHNSON
  • Normal wasn’t doing it for everyone. I like to think that we will be a much more compassionate group of educators, who, “Take time to smell the roses” with our students and not always operate at such a frenetic pace. I also think that snow days will never be the same again. We now know we can teach remotely on those wintry days! ~JENNI NULL
  • I hope with all my heart this will start a positive shift in education. I think teachers, empowered by the networking, shared experiences and tremendous PD opportunities, will demand change and in fact, be willing change agents. ~KATE SMITH
  • I hope families will continue to spend time together and walk together, slow down from the rush of life many of us were living in. I hope that all who are able will continue to work from home at least one day a week – this would cut the emissions by 20%.  ~SUE BARRE
  • My hope is that as a system we will have a better grasp of what students really need. I think many have seen first hand the joy that the arts bring while staying home with their families. I would love it if that carried over into schools and we begin to see more of a focus on social-emotional health and less on mandated testing. ~JEN ETTER
  • I hope there will be a greater appreciation for all the hard working first responders, grocery clerks, truck drivers and delivery workers. I hope that there will be greater respect and appreciation for teachers. Overall, I hope that the world views the arts as a cultural necessity to inspire, express, and support each other through stressful times. ~HOPE LORD
  • I really hope for a large scale “shaking of the etch -a-sketch” as I always say. We need to teach students how to learn, harness their natural curiosities and allow them to lead the way. Throw away our expectations of how and when things should be learned. I would also like to see a more cross curricular and holistic project based approach to learning. ~SHANNON WESTPHAL
  • I feel the obvious positive will be the appreciation for what teachers do on a daily basis. The bigger positive I am hopeful for is a change in society on people being kinder to each other and the planet, seeing the positive effects of humans being out and about less. ~JEFFREY ORTH
  • Families will eat dinner together, take walks together, sing together (I’ve seen some fabulous family sing a longs!) My wish is that they remember it all when this is over and don’t stop those things that are so important! ~LINDA MCVETY
  • Hopefully families will remember what it’s like to be a family and rely less on the screen and more on each other. Times spent outside together will be recognized as sacred and hopefully families will keep going outside together after this is all over. That’s my fervent wish.
    Personally, the positive for me is all the exercise and a little bit of weight loss. I’ve also enjoyed making the teaching videos for my kids. Whenever I run into parents or kids on the trails, they always mention how much they enjoy the videos. ~ALLIE RIMKUNAS
  • Our 7th grade students do not currently have art. Due to COVID 19, our 6th grade Gifted and Talented ART students will be missing a new field trip to the high school for ‘firing’ day. Our district has approved our elementary trip to be moved to the fall and to include the students leaving us for the middle school next year. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if it inspired the school to create art field experiences for all 7th grade students? …recreate the 7th grade art classes as once existed? ~LYNDA LEONAS
  • When this is over I hope the clean, clear, fresh air so many, especially in cities, are experiencing right now will open their eyes to the beauty of it and have a positive impact on our environment and world for now on.  ~HOLLY LEIGHTON
  • I think one of the positives may be that we have a renewed appreciation for the community-building aspect of the arts. Right now it’s such a void that cannot be filled by technology. Yes, there are virtual ensembles that are beautiful, but they aren’t live. I’ve watched some phenomenal performances online, but for me, nothing matches the aesthetic power of being in the moment and sharing that moment with those around you.
    I think a positive outcome could be that we continue to make use of technological  resources we’ve discovered during this time of exclusively remote learning to change our thinking to how we can customize students’ experiences more. ~BILL BUZZA
  • There are many positives to this situation, but for me the biggest impact has been the ability to slow down without judgement.  I know this will be something I consider upon ‘reentry’ to my dance program. ~EMMA CAMPBELL
  • I hope we never have to use another snow day!  I hope there will be a better appreciation for teachers. ~JANE KIRTON
  • The increased connectivity and support between home and school, and between educators, has been the most apparent to me. It’s human nature to come together as communities during times of need. Even during these times where physical distancing is required, I have felt an increased sense of support and togetherness. This is a positive that’s come from COVID-19, and I hope it sticks around when we get “back to normal”. ~DORIE TRIPP
  • First of all, we have been “taught”, by being thrown into this situation, how to use a variety of resources that will help support our student’s learning. Whether through the use of online platforms, or simply the research of new ideas and possibilities, we have seen that many things are possible. I know I have learned a lot about different programs that I am excited about using in (and out of) the classroom. I think that this will also pave the way for utilizing “remote” learning in other situations as well such as snow days, or other interruptions to our daily schedules helping to support consistent development. It may also be an excellent resource for keeping students connected over extended breaks and bridge the gap of relapse we often see.While we have been separated, we have been able to connect with each other. In difficult times, people rise to the challenges. It brings communities together to fight and survive. It helps us to set aside differences to focus on what is most important. So, while I know this has been difficult, I think like many difficult situations in history, it will strengthen our communities.  ~ANTHONY LUFKIN
  • The one positive I can imagine is renewed appreciation for my real teaching experience, the one in the classroom, face to face, having those moments of greatness and inspiration and activity and noise and sass- from the students as well as me! ~DANETTE KERRIGAN
  • Many people will have adapted skills for distance learning and connecting with others anytime/anywhere. Distance learning is not only about using technology. It is about the human experience and reminding us of our desire for connectivity and the security that we are all in this together. ~LEAH OLSON
  • I have a saying that I have used with my students for a very long time…..”Yes you can, yes you will”.  After this is over I am hopeful they will know the truth in this and it will become. their mantra. ~DIANNE FENLASON
  • My fellow educators will be far more digitally savvy and will continue to utilize a blended learning approach since they now are beginning to understand the value of asynchronous learning. The Arts educators in my District have historically been excluded from targeted professional learning. Now we are actively developing courses and resources for them to continue their learning. The students will understand more about creation versus consumption. Their ability to explore resources and use their creativity with found objects in the Arts has already been exhibited. ~BARB VINAL
  • Professionally speaking I feel much better at technology. Personally I look at this time as a gift with my children. As a mom of teenagers I know they will be “leaving the nest” fairly soon and I truly cherish this time with them. ~ANDREA WOLLSTADT
  • A huge positive to carry over once this is done is the community that we have all done well to foster. Regardless of where we are geographically, people are willing to use any means of technology to help. That drive and ability to foster and support community is my hope of what carries into the after. It has been incredibly meaningful and heartfelt how we as a people honestly are striving to find the good in those around us.  ~IVA DAMON
  • I think we ALL – communities, parents, students, teachers – will all have a greater and deeper appreciation for school and all it entails. It’s been amazing to hear from everyone I talk to that EVERYONE misses it. We tend to spend a lot of time looking at the negative of our schools and jobs and not enough time just enjoying all that is wonderful about it all. I hope there is a lot we stop taking for granted. ~ROB WESTERBERG
  • My hope is that we do not lose the lessons we are learning about the interconnectedness of schools, teachers, and communities. I have reached out to the parents of my students in ways that weren’t really expected before we switched to remote learning. This will hopefully continue to be a priority once we figure out our ‘new normal’. ~LISA INGRAHAM
  • I think that teachers, families and students will be a little more appreciative of one another, and how much we need and rely on one another as we move forward. ~ CARMEL COLLINS
  • I’ve tried to provide very detailed lesson plans for students and families. Initially,  I still received LOTS of questions, “I don’t get its”, etc. That has lessened a bit. I think that sometimes we “overteach” and spoon-feed a lot of information. They are now forced to figure that out for themselves, and probably approach the assignments more creatively.  In any event,  those who are still engaged in their learning seem more resilient and creative. ~SUE BEAULIER
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Shutdown Learning

June 3, 2020

What are your thoughts and experiences?

I Invited past Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leaders and Leadership Team members to answer 4 questions – both personal and professional. Each day this week another set of answers is being posted. Today’s blog post includes answers to number 2. Please don’t hesitate to share your answers to the 4 questions. To the teachers who responded (so far) – THANK YOU for your honesty and sharing your new reality. One word that came up for me as I read your responses was BRAVERY! I am grateful that you’re being brave for the learners across the state!

  1. Name one thing that has been an ‘ah-ha’ moment for you during ‘teaching away from school’? One success.
  2. What have you learned that you didn’t know before the school shut down?
  3. What are you doing to bring yourself joy/to take care of yourself?
  4. When this is all over – what do you imagine might be a positive that comes from the pandemic?

SHUTDOWN LEARNING 

  • How resilient the children are and how important intrinsic motivation is. It will lead us through challenging times. High engagement and strong independent voices and projects occurred despite the disconnect, carried forward with the knowledge the students were in charge of their learning. ~LINDSAY PINCHBECK
  • The opportunity for teachers to clarify on the spot is somewhat diminished in the virtual “classroom”, so I have found I need to be much more mindful about what I am presenting and how it might be “read” by students. Having said that I find, just as I did 5-6 years ago when I started doing “virtual critiques” on Google+, that students were much more likely to use the “chat box when asked to offer an opinion. ~CHARLIE JOHNSON
  • I have learned that our school is more than just a vital part of the town. It is truly the heart of the community. We deliver meals weekly by bus to any families in need K-12. We are providing books for each student, as well as sending home learning packets that the bus driver and school nurse deliver to homes. One member of the community is donating masks she has made to the school for anyone who needs one. People are reaching out to one another to check that people are okay, and our superintendent is one of those who reaches out. Everyone is so grateful for the school, the staff, and each other. It is so heartwarming. ~JENNI NULL
  • My “bag of tricks” has certainly grown. I think when we do return to school I will find it much easier to differentiate instruction for my students using new technology that I have learned and relied so heavily on throughout this experience. ~JEN ETTER
  • I’m a technological dinosaur, and a proclaimed skeptic of social media. I still don’t have a Facebook account because I really don’t care what anyone is having for dinner,  and am pretty sure they don’t care what we’re having either. However…this virus has taught me how important social media is…I Zoom with my classes, but also hosted my Mom’s children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren for a virtual 89th birthday party. On the other hand, I have heard from kids and families, about how much they miss us.  Sadly, for some of these kids, we are the only people who are nice to them each day. ~SUE BEAULIER
  • I am going through my certification for ESL teaching, and I was toying with the idea of possibly beginning by teaching online. I now realize after teaching online for the last several weeks that this is not for me. As a teacher I need the physical energy of live students, the vitality, spirit and spontaneous reactions one can only foster through live in person interactions. I love and need the dynamics of a live classroom!!!!
    ~ CARMEL COLLINS
  • I contacted three composers who have written works my choruses are studying and each one of them has agreed to be interviewed by my students in a ZOOM meeting! I’ve created online platforms to help them examine the music, think about techniques the artist has used, passages for them to explore and sing, personal thoughts to ponder about the work, and then they are creating videos to ask their questions of the composer which helps them practice the technique they will use in our official upcoming interview. ~KRIS BISSON
  • Did you know you can change the narration speed in Audible? It’s true. You can also mute kids while teaching them on zoom. I’ve learned to appreciate the little things, to let go the things I cannot control, and to take advantage of free online accounts during pandemics. Oh, and where to find all the really good, free webinars. ~Kate Smith
  • Students are not as tech savvy as I had assumed. I am often leading them through some basics of recording etc…. ~SUE BARRE
  • One major skill I’ve gained is the use of Google classroom to post assignments, grade work, and video conference with my students. I am also learning how to use computer apps on the students’ laptops as art tools, like Google drawings and SketchBook, so that my students can continue to create art at home. I also learned how to utilize the Padlet site to set up visual display boards as a means for students to share their artwork and respond to each other’s art. ~HOPE LORD
  • I have learned to be better at prioritizing myself. It is natural for teachers to always feel the need to do more; it is hard to draw a line. Now that I have a family, it is easier to see the importance of finding and maintaining balance. ~SHANNON WESTPHAL
  • The importance of social gathering and interaction in person and that teaching is harder from a distance then in a classroom. I know that is obvious but it has been a bit more of a challenge. On the other hand, using Google classroom allows for more time for individual feedback. ~JEFFREY ORTH
  • I didn’t know how much I’d miss my kids. Especially now, the 5th graders. I may never see some of them again and it’s distressing. I’ll have to spend all of my spare time at Hannaford when this is over in hopes of running into them. ~ALLIE RIMKUNAS
  • As an art teacher I’ve had to think in a broader way about how best to teach not just art but how to teach students to think creatively. I’ve allowed more independent thinking than I do in my classroom because students bring a wider diversity of materials, time and understanding while working with a packet. They have pleasantly surprised me with their ingenuity. ~GLORIA HEWETT
  • Tech, Tech, Tech and Why to Make Time for It Outside of Class
    Taking the time to learn how to build websites and completing them for each of the two art rooms I teach at in Auburn!  Peek at the Week Learning Targets and Lesson Ideas along with fun at home skill building ideas without expensive art supplies can be posted along with highlights of our art programs such as YAM events. ~LYNDA LEONAS
  • I didn’t know how to use Google Classroom or Zoom which since the pandemic is required, I am learning them and plenty of other sites that are being shared with me. We are all helping each other out. ~HOLLY LEIGHTON
  • I feel like I’ve learned so much in such a short time as we’ve had to totally reinvent our profession literally overnight. At first I was surprised to learn (and be overwhelmed) by how many resources were out there and being offered to us to support continued music education. I’ve learned the importance of just taking a chance and trying something to see if it fits my teaching situation and my students. Just because one product or approach works in one school, doesn’t mean it will work for my students. A specific learning I’ve gained is what a powerful tool the product “Smartmusic” is for the instrumental music program. I had heard about this over the years, but never had the chance to explore it. Now I’m finding it a great tool to provide to students that can give them options to go in any musical direction of their choosing, and a great method of bringing a professional, full ensemble into their personal practice space. ~ BILL BUZZA
  • I think like most educators I have become very well versed in Zoom, or any video chat platform. I have tried to keep this connection with kids because I believe it is important for their social development and mental health. I am definitely slowing down which I am sure is a welcome change of pace for the kids. Trying to be more intuitive to their needs in this complicated time. ~EMMA CAMPBELL
  • I have learned how to set up and use my YouTube Channel, how to use Zoom, how to use SoundTrap and upload. Google Classroom has been wonderful. ~JANE KIRTON
  • I had no idea how to teach music lessons virtually. All of my experience has involved hands-on, in-person learning with children. It has been an enormous learning curve and has felt unnatural, but thanks to social media, professional organizations, and virtual workshops, I have been able to break through to get the job done. I am so grateful for colleagues, across the state and nation, who are willing to share activities, help troubleshoot technology, and problem solve with each other. I know that I wouldn’t have fared quite so well if it weren’t for this support. ~DORIE TRIPP
  • I would have to say I am very impressed with the capabilities of the technology we have been thrown into using, but have also become more aware of the inequities of access in our communities. I am very aware of the broad range of socio economic differences within our communities, but assumed that most people had access to online resources given the progression of technologies in the 21st century. While I still think there is some access, such as through a smartphone, it has become increasingly clear that many of our students do not have the access necessary to utilize the learning opportunities we are resorting to use.  I think and hope that this situation has helped many people gain access to quality online educational resources, and hope that the organizations that have helped make that happen will continue.  ~ANTHONY LUFKIN
  • I learned-in a real way- how important my colleagues were to me-(the other unified arts teachers) for support, collaboration and brainstorming.  I always knew that we were a strong team, but I was in awe of how we came together. ~DANETTE KERRIGAN
  • I’ve learned to Zoom, use Google Classroom and Google Meets, develop a website in WIX, send a Google Form to my students finding out what they have for materials at home they could use for sculpture. I found out everyone has pencils and nail polish. I learned to be flexible with art concepts and use the materials at home. My courses are so material and tool based that I had to forget about that completely and come at it from a different place. Not going to lie, this is hard! Students want to work with their hands so I have been thinking about how they can design with what they have readily available with no stress for the families.  ~LEAH OLSON
  • Throughout this experience (by watching my daughter and son, who attend two different high schools),  I have learned how very different communities and educational focuses vary within our state.  ~DIANNE FENLASON
  • I have learned many things every single day. Although I am now a Digital Learning Coordinator, I have learned from other educators about various online tools, ability to deliver content more effectively and how to really support my staff efficiently. ~BARB VINAL
  • What I have learned is that many of our students do not have internet access at home and they do not  have a device to access online remote learning. What I hope comes out of this as a state is that we find a way to provide internet access and devices to students to make learning more equitable. Especially thinking ahead to next year and how long remote learning might last.  ~SAMANTHA ARMSTRONG
  • I’ve learned that my students (and their families) are resilient and flexible. I’ve learned that my co-workers and administrators are extremely supportive. I feel very blessed to work in my district. People have been reaching out to one another in a myriad of ways and it’s truly heartwarming. ~ANDREA WOLLSTADT
  • Personally, I have learned to bake bread. It is both a lot easier and a lot more difficult than I had anticipated. Professionally, I have learned a lot in regards to both technology and learning to let go of things. Before this I had participated in video conferencing, setting appointments in Google Calendar, and I used Google Classroom, but now it’s normal to host multiple meetings per day. It has become the new
    normal to be sitting with my phone to check emails, one laptop to be running a meeting, and possibly a second laptop to be reviewing notes and materials while also entertaining a baby. Technology is an amazing thing, but knowing where to draw the line is really important. I may be comfortable with it, but that doesn’t mean my students or colleagues are. It also doesn’t mean that at my fourth or fifth meeting of the day I am as energized as I was for the first. Sometimes it ends up being more important to know when too much is too much and to communicate to others when one’s limits are near to being hit. In this new normal where we can constantly be putting so much of ourselves into devices and technology to help others, it’s important to know when to stop and take care of ourselves.~IVA DAMON
  • Good leadership is compassionate, flexible, informed, and hits the ground running! I am incredibly grateful for the decision-making taking place in my school district, at the MDOE, and the State House. The creative ways they have found to support students and teachers has been remarkable. ~LISA INGRAHAM
  • How critical “learning environment” is to student success. I’ve always cognitively known that, but I’ve really internalized it since we’ve been at home. It is quite honestly the linchpin that holds everything else together… never appreciated that to the degree that I do now. ~ROB WESTERBERG
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Call for MALI Teacher Leaders

May 29, 2020

Deadline – June 1

Interested in taking on a leadership role in education – the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) might be the right match for you. Click on the images below to make them larger! Don’t hesitate, apply today. Deadline: June 1!

 

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Call for MALI Teacher Leaders

May 21, 2020

You’re invited!

Visual, Performing and Literary Arts Teacher/

Teaching Artist Leader SEARCH: MALI – Phase 20-21

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MONDAY, JUNE 1Join us for a GREAT opportunity! The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative invites YOU, with other selected Maine teachers and teaching artists, to be part of a year-long exploration in leading your school communities and the profession in effective teaching and learning in the arts.  If you are selected, you will be expected to attend the 2020 Summer Institute, taking place virtually June 15, July 24, and in-person August 5, pending state policy.   

This year’s Institute will explore Leading with Resilience; Embedding Social and Emotional Learning in our Teaching, Ourselves, and Our Communities; and Arts Advocacy.  

If you are selected, there is no cost to attend the Institute; however the expectation is that you integrate your learnings in your classroom, your school community, and share with other educators in your region of Maine and beyond.  Full participants will receive documentation of up to 35 contact hours.   

If interested, please complete the online application form, linked here and below, by June 1.

Questions? Contact Martha Piscuskas, Director of Arts Education at the Maine Arts Commission, Martha.Piscuskas@maine.gov  207-287-2750

Year-long Expectations for Teaching Artist/Teacher leaders (TA/TAL):

  • Attend New Teacher/TA introduction cohort zoom on Monday June 15
  • Complete pre-reading/viewing and participate in online discussion (on google classroom) 
  • Attend and participate in 2 virtual discussion meetings on Wednesdays – June 24 & July 15 – (w/mixed cohorts and breakout rooms)
  • Attend August 5, Wednesday in-person day in Waterville (tbd) if possible
  • Commit to two reflection sessions as a MALI TA/TAL one with cohort, one with “thought partner”
  • Develop a personalized Growth Plan for the coming year, and practice/learn ways to share it with others
  • Engage in Fall “thought partner” one-on-one check in 
  • Attend winter retreat – tentatively February 28, 2021.  Will include update on personal goal and/or action plan 
  • Author a guest blog post on the Maine Arts Ed daily blog

JOIN US!  Become a Teacher Leader and Change Lives 

APPLY TODAY!

Questions on the Application:

Name/contact information

Administrator Name/contact information (if classroom teacher)

Paragraph of Interest — Selected individuals will be expected to be active leaders in helping to develop and support excellence in teaching and learning in Maine. A full commitment to the Institute timeline is expected as seen in the online information sheet.  Please attach a brief overview of your interest and current/past experience (if any) in Leadership. Include your experience collaborating with other arts educators and experiences relevant to the initiative.  (Please no more than ~ 500 words, about 1 page.) 

Resume/CV —  If you are a Teaching Artist, please also include websites or documentation of your teaching work.  

Letter of Reference – CLASSROOM TEACHERS: This should be from your administrator.  TEACHING ARTISTS: This should be from a school or community  organization with whom you have worked.   Please attach a Letter of Recommendation in which the person includes comments and/or examples reflecting your leadership potential and your ability to work collaboratively.  Selected individuals will be responsible for sharing their newly developed expertise and related classroom experiences with other arts educators.

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative 

Background Information

MALI MISSION

MALI’s OVERALL OBJECTIVES 

  • Create and implement a statewide plan for teacher leadership in arts education. This includes professional development opportunities, locally, regionally and statewide, which will expand on the knowledge and skills of teachers to better prepare them to teach in a student-centered and proficiency-based learning environment.
  • Develop and implement standards-based high quality teaching and learning statewide for Visual and Performing Arts 
  • Continue to build on expanding the team of arts educators and teaching artists representing all regions of Maine
  • Provide workshops and other professional development opportunities for educators 
  • Founded in 2011
  • 108 teacher leaders and teaching artists leaders have attended summer institutes on assessment, leadership, technology, creativity, proficiency-based standards-based and student-centered teaching and learning
  • Teacher leaders have presented workshops at three statewide arts education conferences, with over 600 educators attending
  • Teacher leaders facilitated regional workshops across Maine and 15 mega-regional sites across Maine
  • Maine Arts Ed Blog — 78 teachers profiled in Another Arts Teacher’s Story series 
  • Arts assessment graduate courses offered by New England Institute for
    Teacher Education
  • Nine arts education assessment webinars for Maine educators facilitated by Rob Westerberg and Catherine Ring – archived
  • Video stories of seven teacher leaders that demonstrate a standards-based arts education classroom located on Maine ARTSEducation YouTube channel
  • Teacher Leader Resource Team development of items for resource bank
  • Maine Arts Assessment Resources website
  • Partners have included MDOE, USM, MAEA, MMEA, University of Maine Performing Arts, and New England Institute for Teacher Education, Bates College

For More Information

APPLY TODAY TO BECOME A MALI TEACHER LEADER

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Open Art Teachers Studio

April 29, 2020

Create, talk and share

The Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) is sponsoring Open Art Teachers Studio: Quarantine Edition. Five sessions are being offered on Wednesday’s May 6 – June 3, Zoom, 3:30 – 4:30. An opportunity to create, talk & share for K-12 visual arts educators. Contact hours available. You may attend one or more and receive contact hours for the sessions in which you participate.

REGISTER TO ATTEND

REGISTER TO ATTEND

 

DETAILS 

  • Open Art Teachers Studio is a time (1 hour) and place (Zoom) where K-12 Visual Arts Educators can come together and create! Each session begins with a unique & creative teacher-led hands-on experience followed by discussion.
  • We believe that having a time to create and share as adult artists is vital to our continued success as Visual Arts Educators.
  • First half of the hour is creating & the second half is for sharing current activities, successes, trading resources, troubleshooting, networking, and to support one another.
  • Join us for the 5 session series:
    Wednesdays, 5/6 – 6/3, 3:30 – 4:30 pm
    Come to one or Come to All!
    First session: Portraits! Come prepared with materials you feel most comfortable with
    to create a portrait in any style! Questions – reach out via email:
    Martha Piscuskas, Director or Arts Education, Maine Arts Commission Martha.Piscuskas@maine.gov
    Melanie Crowe, Hampden Academy Art Teacher, MALI Teacher Leader – mcrowe@rsu22.us
    Iva Damon, Leavitt Area High School Art Teacher, MALI Teacher Leader – iva.damon@msad52.org
    Bronwyn Sale, Bates College Instructor – bsale@bates.edu
  • Contact hours available: Sponsored by Maine Arts Leadership Initiative

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Tuneful Talk Tuesdays

March 29, 2020

Opportunity for PK-6 elementary music teachers

Maine Arts Leadership Initiative Teacher Leaders Danielle Collins, Catherine Newell, Cynthia Keating, Will Stecher, Dorie Trip, and Kaitlin Young are collaborating to offer a round table for PK-6 elementary classroom music educators. These 6 elementary music educators are aware that teachers are in different places in this transition due to the pandemic of the Coronavirus. They are hopeful that by combining their powers that they can work to problem solve some of the challenges everyone is facing and celebrate the successes that are happening each day!
You’re invited to join them for Tuneful Talk Tuesday’s at Two! March 31, 2:00, Zoom – CLICK THIS LINK. If you have questions please contact Kaitlin Young at kyoung@sedomocha.org.
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