Posts Tagged ‘PMA’

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Portland Museum of Art Open House

March 10, 2017

Teachers, we appreciate you!

In appreciation of teachers the Portland Museum of Art is having an Open House, just for you!

Image credit: Side x Side Summer Arts Institute, June 2016. Photos by Joel Ellis Brown and Tonee Harbert.

Image credit: Side x Side Summer Arts Institute, June 2016.
Photos by Joel Ellis Brown and Tonee Harbert.

Thursday, March 23
Drop in any time between 3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Free; registration is strongly encouraged.
R.S.V.P. by March 10 to Louisa Donelson, Associate Educator for Youth Learning, at ldonelson@portlandmuseum.org.

Teachers, you are our best allies when it comes to sharing the PMA collection with Maine youth and we want to show our appreciation with a free Open House. Teachers in any subject, Pre-K to 12, as well as homeschoolers are invited to visit the newly reinstalled PMA.
Participate however you like, for as long as you like.

  • Join in interactive gallery activities such as haiku writing or
    contour line drawing.
  • Explore our reinstalled galleries, which now host 20% more art.
  • Learn about our new school tour themes from staff and docents
  • Network with educators across grades and disciplines.
  • Tour the new Peggy L. Osher Art Study and Collection Committee Conference Room (3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. only).
  • Enjoy complimentary refreshments.
  • Receive complimentary classroom resources.

Note: educators are always welcome to visit free of charge to assist in field trip planning. Information on parking can be found here.

Student and teacher programming at the PMA is made possible by Unum.

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YAM it Up!

March 3, 2017

Youth Art Month

Invitation artwork created by Lizzie Valdmanis grade 6 collagraph kimono

Invitation artwork created by Lizzie Valdmanis grade 6 collagraph kimono

The Maine Art Education Association

and the

Portland Museum of Art

Cordially Invite You to the Opening Reception

of

Youth Art Month

at the Portland Museum of Art

on

Saturday, March 11, 2017

4:00-7:30 pm

Presentation of Certificates of Participation:

4:30 PM: Grades K-3

5:30 PM: Grades 4-7

6:30 PM: Grades 8-12

The youth Art Month Exhibition remains hanging:

March 1 thru April 2, 3017

For more information about the Maine Art Education Association please CLICK HERE.

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Portland Museum of Art

February 3, 2017

Open house

The Portland Museum of Art invites you to their free open house on Saturday, February 4, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. They’ve completing changes to the museum and they’d like you to see if first. All are welcome at no cost!

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You’re invited… for an all-day Open House with free admission for everyone to the Portland Museum of Art. Gallery talks with community members, and all-ages games and art-making activities. Explore an entirely new PMA and discover the strength and new visual presentation of the museum’s collection, which features 20% more art on view—often in new and surprising places—themed galleries, and interactive, multimedia kiosks.

These events also mark the public openings of the museum’s spring exhibitions: The Thrill of the Chase: The Wagstaff Collection of Photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum, The Mistress and the Muse: Selections from the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection, and Artist’s Choice: Photographs from the Judy Glickman Lauder Collection.

Activities throughout the day include:
Community Highlights Catalog – Reimagine your favorite work of art in the PMA. Using a variety of drawing and collage materials, create your own version of your favorite work in the collection and leave it behind to be added into our community-created highlights catalog.
Community Voices – We are inviting community members to share personal responses to their favorite work in the collection. Hear unique 15-minute perspectives on the collection.

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For more information please contact Louisa Donelson at ldonelson@portlandmuseum.org or call 207.699.4885.

Admission for the Community Open House is courtesy of TD Bank and TD Charitable Foundation.

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Introducing Jenn DePrizio

May 25, 2015

Director of Learning and Interpretation – Portland Museum of Art

jdeprizioheadshot1Recently, I had the opportunity to have a wonderful conversation with Jenn DePrizio, the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the Portland Museum of Art. This blog post provides you the chance to learn about Jenn and some of the work she is doing at the museum.

Please tell the Maine Arts Education blog readers about your background.

As an undergraduate studying art history, I didn’t even know museum education was a career option. I knew that I loved that learning about art of the past. I started in the classics department, but after a debacle in Greek class, I became an art history major. Art could convey ideas, beliefs, and political propaganda. Works of art can be both windows, offering a view beyond one’s self, and mirrors, providing a reflection of one’s self. Through my study of art history, I learned about not only the past, times and places different than my own, but also about myself and how I fit into the world. I thought, “This is so cool. How can I share this with others?” And then I learned from an intern supervisor, who is now my best friend, that I could make a career out of that desire! So off I went to George Washington University and got a Masters of Arts in Teaching in Museum Education. Before coming to the PMA, I worked at the Vermont Historical Society, Worcester Art Museum, J. Paul Getty Museum, and most recently Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. At each of these museums my main focus was on gallery teaching and creating engaging gallery experiences for visitors of all ages. I look forward to finding ways to continue this work in Portland, making the PMA a place of discovery, innovation and excitement in terms of gallery learning.

Why did you want to leave Massachusetts and move to Maine?

I have always loved Maine as a visitor and in particular Portland. For me, quality of life is an important factor in making decisions about my professional life. My husband and I were looking for a place to raise our young daughter. We wanted to live in a place that combined all the benefits of a city (including good restaurants and bars—for a number of years before having my daughter I wrote a cocktail blog), with a relaxed atmosphere and connection to nature. This past weekend as we enjoyed our lobster rolls and haddock sandwiches out at the Five Island Lobster Co., we were reassured that we made the right choice in moving to Maine.

Describe your responsibilities as the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the Portland Museum of Art.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 5.43.31 PMAs the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the PMA, I am responsible for developing enriching and engaging opportunities for visitors of all ages to engage with authentic works of art. A big part of that work since I have come on board at the PMA has been exploring who the museum’s audiences are currently and thinking deeply about who are the audiences that we are not reaching. Hanging over my desk, I have written a quote by David Carr that reads, “Museums aren’t for everyone. But they should be for anyone.” How can we make the museum accessible to anyone who may be inclined to want to explore art and creativity with us?

One of the greatest challenges for museum’s today is meeting the changing needs and expectation of today’s audience, while remaining true to one’s intellectual integrity and institution’s mission. Many museum-goers are savvy cultural consumers who expect to benefit from the museum’s expertise. They also want to be actively engaged and to be given the freedom to chose and organize their own experience. There are also a great number of Americans who do not approach museums with the same comfort level and sense that museums as vital places of learning and engagement. For many, museums are intimidating and a visit can be daunting, overwhelming and frustrating if they are not provided with basic orientation and safe entry points to begin to look closely and make meaning of the works of art. It is my responsibility to work collaboratively with my colleagues across the museum to ensure that the needs of both these types of visitors are considered and planned for.

What are the goals of art education programs at the Portland Museum of Art?

I am fortunate to have a dedicated and thoughtful team at the PMA to work with on a daily basis. Together we strive to encourage curiosity and wonder for visitors to the PMA. By offering audiences of all ages opportunities to connect with authentic works of art through programs that offer open-ended experiences, intellectual rigor and exploration of the creative process, we hope that we can impact the lives of PMA audiences. A successful art education program may look a little different depending on the audience and the activity. But if I were to imagine an ideal scene in the galleries that signaled success, here is what I would see and hear: Visitors would be looking closely at works of art. There would be times of quiet contemplation and moments of boisterous conversation. Visitors would share observations, possible interpretations, while the docent or staff would find ways to build on those ideas. Perhaps most important of all, visitors would wonder aloud, they would ask questions, they would speculate. Through that curiosity their connection to the work of art and the world around them would expand.

I believe that art museums can change people’s lives. As museum educators, my team and I have a chance to contribute to the vitality of our community by connecting art of the past and the work of living artists with contemporary issues relevant to our visitors. In working with varied audiences—school children and teachers, teens, families, adults, docents, museum members, tourists—we then craft programs that meet the individual needs of each.

Since many of your readers are classroom teachers, I can talk a bit more about our goals related to K-12 students and teachers. Currently, we serve about 7,000 students through our school tour program, but we could be serving many more. I hope that teachers know that visits to the PMA are free for them and their students.

Moving forward we will be building programs that promote the primacy of the in-gallery experience. What is unique about the experience that students can have at the PMA? By looking at and talking about works of art, students can develop their looking and critical thinking skills. Having seen the positive impact firsthand, I am huge proponent of Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) and am exploring ways we strengthen our programs using this teaching approach. Because VTS is grounded in research and developmental theory, it is rare as a pedagogy in that it begins with the learner and the questions they have, not the information that we, as adults, think is relevant to the students. The students guide the discussion to what they are wondering about, and the teacher is there to help them get to where they want to go. And the listening skills, the empathy and respect for others that VTS teaches connects back to the idea I was talking about earlier—the work of the L&I department at the PMA can impact the lives of our visitors in profound ways.

If you were given $500,000 to do whatever you please, what would it be?

While there are so many ideas I have, the first thing I would do with such a trove of money would be to make the museum free to all visitors. For many the financial barrier is a serious one, and to truly impact our community we need to eliminate as many barriers as we can. Art should be accessible to everyone. In the words of William Morris, “I do not want art for a few, any more than education for a few, or freedom for a few.”

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Portland Museum of Art

April 17, 2015

Teen focus group

Screen Shot 2015-04-15 at 4.34.42 PMStudents are invited to join in a casual and fun, analytical gallery discussion on a specific work of art and then we’ll do a feedback forum exploring questions like: What is it like to be a teen in the PMA? What’s great? What’s not so great? Do you come visit without your class or family? Why or Why not? Focus groups will last one hour and be held at the PMA. We encourage students to bring their friends. Plus…we’ll provide snacks.

Please share this opportunity with your students and if they grant permission, reply to me with their names and emails or phone. I will follow up with them directly regarding dates of the focus group (the first one is during April vacation week). We’re looking for students aged 14-18 years old. An interest in museums and art is preferable but not necessary.

Why should they help us? We want the PMA to be a place where teens can hang out, see art they love (and see art they don’t love), and be part of the growing community at the museum. We want to better understand teen audiences and teens are the only ones that can help us with that.

For more information please check out the webpage at http://www.portlandmuseum.org/events/open-call-teens-ideas. If you have questions, don’t hesitate to contact Louisa Donelson at ldonelson@portlandmuseum.org.

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Youth Art Month

March 2, 2015

March ~ 2015
Twenty-One Years of Meaningful Collaboration
The Maine Art Education Association

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 10.37.16 PM
The Portland Museum of Art
You are Cordially Invited to the
Celebratory Reception and Opening of
Youth Art Month
Please join us on Saturday, March 7th
4:00 to 7:30 p.m.
Portland Museum of Art

Certificates of Participation and Honor
will be presented
4:30 pm     Grades K-3
         5:30 pm     Grades 4-7
           6:30 pm     Grades 8-12
The Youth Art Month Show
Remains Hanging
February 28 through March 29, 2014
Invitation artwork created by
Zoe Eason, Grade 5
Boothbay Region Elementary School

Artwork created by Zoe Eason, Boothbay Region Elementary School,  Grade 5, “Autumn Cake”, Oil Pastels, Jessica Nadeau, Art Teacher

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Evening for Educators

October 3, 2014

Wednesday, October 8, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Portland Museum of Art

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Evening for Educators: Looking at British Art with Amelia Rauser

Free for Teachers

Join us at 4 p.m., Wednesday, October 8, for this overview of Treasures of British Art 1400-2000: The Berger Collection with guest lecturer Amelia Rauser, Associate Professor of Art History at Franklin & Marshall College, to prepare for bringing your students to see this spectacular exhibit. Evening for Educators provides teachers with classroom resources, two contact hours, network opportunities, and a chance to discover the benefits of PMA Free School Tours.

To register for this event online, please click here.

For questions, please click here.

For questions, please contact Stacy Rodenberger at srodenberger@portlandmuseum.org, Assistant Director of Student and Teacher Learning.

Exhibition programming is made possible by the Berger Collection Educational Trust. Found support: F.M. Kirby Foundation. Corporate support: Unum and The Bear Bookshop, Marlboro, VT.

Image Credit: Benjamin West (United States, 1738-1820), Queen Charlotte, circa 1776, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 1/4 inches. The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum, TL-19057

Image Credit: Benjamin West (United States, 1738-1820), Queen Charlotte, circa 1776, oil on canvas, 50 x 40 1/4 inches. The Berger Collection at the Denver Art Museum, TL-19057

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