Posts Tagged ‘Poetry Foundation’

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POL Southern Regional Finals

February 13, 2019

Amazing Reciters

The Poetry Out Loud (POL) Southern Maine Regional Finals were held earlier this week at the beautiful Westbrook Performing Arts Center. Students traveled from 17 high schools in the southern part of the state to recite poetry. The Maine Arts Commission held the Poetry Out Loud (POL) Southern Maine Regional Finals in conjunction with the Poetry Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Students have been practicing and reciting poems in schools across the state and country since the fall. For the event each student had prepared three recitations and wowed the audience with their amazing performances.

We’re so proud of the following students who participated (listed in order of their recitations, selected randomly). The names with stars are the five students moving onto the state finals on March 11 at the Waterville Opera House, 3:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The Messalonskee Jazz Band under the direction of music educator Andy Forster will perform at 2:45 and again in between recitations. All are welcome!

  • Jack Lent, North Yarmouth Academy
  • Stephanie Brown, Portland High School
  • Amber Soucy, Lisbon High School
  • Kaitlyn Guay, Greely High School
  • Liam Doyle, South Portland High School
  • Hannah Smith, Westbrook High School
  • Helen Strout, Cape Elizabeth High School
  • Delaney Ziegman, Thornton Academy**
  • Aaliyah Biamby, Gorham High School**
  • Olivia Cox, Mt. Ararat High School
  • Blythe Thompson, Waynflete School
  • Wyatt Bates, Yarmouth High School**
  • Maya Ham, Oak Hill High School
  • Charles Van West, Maine Coast Waldorf School
  • Allison Rickert, Kennebunk High School
  • Allan Monga, Deering High School**
  • Joao Victor, Lewiston High School**

For more information about the Poetry Out Loud program please go the POL pages at the Maine Arts Commission website.

Southern Regional Finalists Wyatt Bates, Delaney Zeigman, Aaliyah Biamby, Allan Monga, and Joao Victor

Poetry Out Loud is organized nationally by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation and administered at the state level by the Maine Arts Commission. It begins in Maine’s schools where school champions are selected to compete in two regional finals at which ten students are ultimately selected to recite at the state finals. One student, the state champion, moves on from the state finals to represent Maine at the national finals in Washington D.C., where students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico will compete for a total of $50,000 in awards and school stipends for the purchase of poetry books.

Poetry Out Loud uses a pyramid structure that starts at the classroom level. Winners advance to a school-wide competition, then to a regional and/or state competition, and ultimately to the National Finals.

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Poetry for Halloween

October 28, 2018

Access poems to compliment what you’re teaching

The Poetry Foundation is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. (taken from their website) The Poetry Foundation is the publisher of Poetry magazine.

If you’re looking for a huge selection of poems to incorporate into lessons take a look at what they provide. Especially for the Halloween season, you might want a poem to share with your students. I’ve provided two below and some information about each one that arrived in my email by the National Endowment for the Arts/Poetry Out Loud program. If you’d like more information about several Halloween poems they are AVAILABLE HERE.

Halloween Party by Kenn Nisbett

Here’s a poem for the younger set. Written in a meter and rhythm that readers of children’s poetry will recognize, this poem is in the voice of a young boy dressed as Dracula, who finds himself in the scariest place any kid can imagine: looking stupid in front of his entire class.

Scariest lines:

The other kids stare like I’m some kind of freak—
the Halloween party is not till next week.

Costume how-to: In this case, how about a party how-to? It’s elementary school so, okay, there are limits. Nothing too scary, but candy and costumes, a few games, and then more candy. In the classroom, everyone’s doing the Monster Mash and sifting through their loot. Fun and not too freaky. But down the hall? The scariest place in any school is the inside of the teachers’ lounge.

Creepy fact: According to multiple sources, Kenn Nesbitt, while being a poet, is a completely normal, well-adjusted human being.

Originally Published: October 26th, 2006

Halloween Party

We’re having a Halloween party at school.
I’m dressed up like Dracula. Man, I look cool!
I dyed my hair black, and I cut off my bangs.
I’m wearing a cape and some fake plastic fangs.
I put on some makeup to paint my face white,
like creatures that only come out in the night.
My fingernails, too, are all pointed and red.
I look like I’m recently back from the dead.
My mom drops me off, and I run into school
and suddenly feel like the world’s biggest fool.
The other kids stare like I’m some kind of freak—
the Halloween party is not till next week.
“Halloween Party.” © 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt. Reprinted from When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (© 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt) with permission from Meadowbrook Press.
Source: When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (2005)

Grieving his dead love, Lenore, the speaker is disturbed by a ceaseless tapping at the door. He opens it to first—eek!—nothing. Then comes the raven, who stirs and intensifies the speaker’s grief by croaking out, again and again, the fateful single word “nevermore.” See how Poe uses repetition to build the poem’s momentum, how the meter accelerates with your breath. No balm awaits: the raven remains, terrorizing and haunting. Will Poe’s hero escape it?

Scariest lines:

Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown
before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
Then the bird said “Nevermore.”

Costume how-to: The Bereft. Dark pouches under bloodshot eyes, hair and clothes unkempt, with a bit of paranoia tossed in to underscore your inconsolable sorrow. (Hint: Have a paper due? Pull an all-nighter or two.) Must-have accessory: The raven (stuffed?), of course, with its dark, oily feathers and beady eyes.

Creepy fact: The cause of Poe’s death remains a mystery, but has been variously attributed to alcoholism, cholera, syphilis, brain disease, and, recently, rabies.

The Raven

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
    While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
            Only this and nothing more.”
    Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
    Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
    From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
            Nameless here for evermore.
    And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
    So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
    “’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;—
            This it is and nothing more.”
    Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
    But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
    And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—
            Darkness there and nothing more.
    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
    But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
    And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—
            Merely this and nothing more.
    Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
    “Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
      Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
            ’Tis the wind and nothing more!”
    Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
    Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
    But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
            Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;
    For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
    Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door—
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
            With such name as “Nevermore.”
    But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
    Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
    Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
            Then the bird said “Nevermore.”
    Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store
    Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
    Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
            Of ‘Never—nevermore’.”
    But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
    Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
    Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
            Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”
    This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;
    This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
    On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,
But whose velvet-violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,
            She shall press, ah, nevermore!
    Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
    “Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
    Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
    Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—
    On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—
    Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
    It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!” I shrieked, upstarting—
“Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!
    Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
    Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
    And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,
    And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
            Shall be lifted—nevermore!
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Halloween

October 31, 2017

Halloween poems

Poetry Out Loud is organized nationally by The National Endowment for the Arts and The Poetry Foundation and administered at the state level by the Maine Arts Commission. The program is underway in high schools across the country. It begins in Maine’s schools where school champions are selected to compete in two regional finals at which ten students are ultimately selected to recite at the state finals. One student, the state champion, moves on from the state finals to represent Maine at the national finals in Washington D.C., where students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico will compete for a total of $50,000 in awards and school stipends for the purchase of poetry books.

To learn more about the program in Maine please go to the Poetry Out Loud home page. The Poetry Out Loud registration deadline for high schools is November 6.

On the Poetry Foundation website you can find several poems for Halloween.

Halloween Party

We’re having a Halloween party at school.
I’m dressed up like Dracula. Man, I look cool!
I dyed my hair black, and I cut off my bangs.
I’m wearing a cape and some fake plastic fangs.
I put on some makeup to paint my face white,
like creatures that only come out in the night.
My fingernails, too, are all pointed and red.
I look like I’m recently back from the dead.
My mom drops me off, and I run into school
and suddenly feel like the world’s biggest fool.
The other kids stare like I’m some kind of freak—
the Halloween party is not till next week.
“Halloween Party.” © 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt. Reprinted from When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (© 2005 by Kenn Nesbitt) with permission from Meadowbrook Press.
Source: When the Teacher Isn’t Looking (2005)
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Poetry Out Loud

October 18, 2016

Register now

All Maine High Schools Welcome to Participate in National Poetry Recitation Contest

image001Augusta, ME—The Maine Arts Commission is pleased to announce that online registration is now open for all Maine high schools to participate quickly and easily in Poetry Out Loud 2016-2017, a national competition organized by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation and administered at the state level by the Arts Commission. The deadline for registration at http://bit.do/MaineArts_POLRegister is November 7, 2016.

The Poetry Out Loud state champion earns $200 and an all-expenses paid trip with an adult chaperone to Washington, D.C. to compete in the national finals. The state winner’s school will receive a $500 stipend for the purchase of poetry books. The first runner-up will receive $100, with $200 for his or her school library. The National Endowment for the Arts will award $50,000 total in cash and school stipends at the national finals, with a $20,000 award for the Poetry Out Loud National Champion.

Maine’s 2016 Poetry Out Loud Champion Rose Horowitz of Mt. Ararat High School in Topsham, who also took first place nationally in a new opportunity for the finalists to showcase their original poetry through an optional competition called Poetry Ourselves, shown here with National Endowment for the Arts chair Jane Chu at the competition finals in Washington, D.C. Photo courtesy Maine Arts Commission.

Maine’s 2016 Poetry Out Loud Champion Rose Horowitz of Mt. Ararat High School in Topsham, who also took first place nationally in a new opportunity for the finalists to showcase their original poetry through an optional competition called Poetry Ourselves, shown here with National Endowment for the Arts chair Jane Chu at the competition finals in Washington, D.C. Photo courtesy Maine Arts Commission.

Poetry Out Loud begins at the local level, and can take place in schools anytime between now and January 9, 2017 as the program does not require full class periods and can be completed in just two to three weeks. Almost 10,000 Maine students and 220 teachers from 45 high schools across the state participated in Poetry Out Loud in 2015-2016, mastering public-speaking skills, building self-confidence, and learning about their literary heritage. The program encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Since Poetry Out Loud began, millions of students at more than 7,300 schools nationwide have been involved. Starting at the classroom level, teachers are provided with free multimedia curriculum materials – a Learning Recitation audio guide, a teacher’s guide, posters and comprehensive website, http://www.poetryoutloud.org, all aligned to national standards – to augment their regular poetry curriculum with poetry recitation at a school-level, then district-level competition.

“Poetry Out Loud is one of many examples of high-quality, partnership-based programs that the NEA offers to schools and communities across the country,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “By helping students foster creative thinking skills and inspire self-expression, we are laying a foundation for lifelong learning in the arts.”

To learn more about Poetry out Loud in Maine, see the promotional national videos “Get involved in POL!” and “Why Poetry Out Loud?” as well as a short video highlighting the 2015 Maine State Finals. In addition, Poetry Out Loud is aligned with both the NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English) Standards and Common Core State Standards: learn more at www.poetryoutloud.org/teaching-resources/ncte-english-teaching-standards.

The Maine Arts Commission believes that the arts are an essential part of a well-rounded education. Through its Arts Education program, the Commission creates and supports innovative arts learning opportunities that engage both students and teachers in creative thinking, arts participation and the building of vibrant learning communities. Please visit mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Arts-in-Education to find more information about the benefits of Poetry Out Loud, as well as information on all educational programming offered by the Maine Arts Commission.

Additional information on Poetry Out Loud is available at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/POL-Home, or by contacting Argy Nestor, Maine Arts Commission Director of Arts Education at argy.nestor@maine.gov or 207-287-2713.

The Maine Arts Commission shall encourage and stimulate public interest and participation in the cultural heritage and cultural programs of our state; shall expand the state’s cultural resources; and shall encourage and assist freedom of artistic expression for the well being of the arts, to meet the needs and aspirations of persons in all parts of the state.

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Poetry Out Loud State Finals

March 7, 2016

March 15, 3:00 PM, Waterville Opera House

THE MAINE ARTS COMMISSION ANNOUNCES POETRY OUT LOUD STATE FINALS
Maine High School Students Compete in National Poetry Recitation Contest

Augusta, ME—The Maine Arts Commission is presenting the 2016 Maine State Finals for Poetry Out Loud, a National Poetry Recitation Contest, on March 15 at 3 p.m. at the Waterville Opera House. The competition, presented in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation, is free and open to the public. Jennifer Rooks, MPBN’s Public Affairs Host, will be the emcee. Doors open to the public at 2:30 p.m. and no tickets are required.

Poetry Out Loud encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Since Poetry Out Loud began, millions of students at more than 7,300 schools nationwide have been involved. This school year, almost 10,000 Maine students have participated in the program, providing them with an opportunity to master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage.

“Poetry Out Loud is one of many examples of high-quality, partnership-based programs that the NEA offers to schools and communities across the country,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “By helping students foster creative thinking skills and inspire self-expression, we are laying a foundation for lifelong learning in the arts.”

Poetry Out Loud is organized by the NEA and the Poetry Foundation, and is administered at the state level by the Maine Arts Commission. It began this year in Maine’s high schools where each school selected a champion to compete in a regional competition. From the two regional finals, 10 students were selected to compete in the State Finals. One student will move on from the State Finals to represent Maine at the National Finals in Washington D.C., where students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico will compete for a total of $50,000 in awards and school stipends for the purchase of poetry books.

Congratulations to the following students who will participate in the Maine State Finals at the Waterville Opera House:
•  Lydia Caron, Bangor High School
•  Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School
•  Shiloh Munsen, Freeport High School
•  Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School
•  Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy
•  Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School
•  Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School
•  Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School
•  Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School
•  Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School

For more information, please visit http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/POL-Home or contact Argy Nestor, Maine Arts Commission Director of Arts Education at argy.nestor@maine.gov or 207-287-2713.

The Maine Arts Commission shall encourage and stimulate public interest and participation in the cultural heritage and cultural programs of our state; shall expand the state’s cultural resources; and shall encourage and assist freedom of artistic expression for the well being of the arts, to meet the needs and aspirations of persons in all parts of the state.

Southern Region State Finalists left to right: Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School; Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School; Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School; Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School; Shilo Munsen, Freeport High School

Southern Region State Finalists left to right: Charlotte Benoit, Greely High School; Rose Horowitz, Mt. Ararat High School; Ben Millspaugh, Waynflete School; Sylvia Holland, Maine Coast Waldorf School; Shilo Munsen, Freeport High School

Northern Region State Finalists left to right: Lydia Caron, Bangor High School; Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School; Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy; Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School; Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School

Northern Region State Finalists left to right: Lydia Caron, Bangor High School; Morgan Steward, Carrabec High School; Danielle Barrett, Hampden Academy; Owen Sinclair, Rangeley Lakes Regional School; Anna Bucklin, Searsport District High School

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POL Today

February 29, 2016

Northern Regional Finals – Hampden Academy

The Poetry Out Loud (POL) Northern Regional Finals will be held today starting at 3:00 PM at Hampden Academy. The Maine Arts Commission (MAC) invites you to attend this exciting event – no cost and open to the public. Nineteen students will be competing for one of 5 spots in the State Finals. The following students have already competed at the school level and will proudly represent them:

  • Lydia Caron – Bangor High School
  • Amanda O’Brien – Calais High School
  • Kara Robak – Camden Hills Regional High School
  • Morgan Steward – Carrabec High School
  • Abigail Corson – Gardiner Area High School
  • Phoebe Zildjian – George Stevens Academy
  • Emily Albert – Hall-Dale High School
  • Danielle Barrett – Hampden Academy
  • Katherine McKee – Kents Hill School
  • Dianna Nicholas – Lee Academy
  • Hannah Orr – Maine Central Institute
  • Antyna Gould – Medomak Valley High School
  • Tara Seymour – Messalonskee High School
  • Emmeline Willey – Monmouth Academy
  • Michaela Dube – Presque Isle High School
  • Owen Sinclair – Rangeley Lakes Regional School
  • Stefanie Johansen – Richmond High School
  • Anna Bucklin – Searsport District High School
  • Lauren Brown – Waterville Senior High School

We are happy to include in today’s program the Hampden Academy R&B Project, under the direction of music teacher Patrick Michaud. They are one of four jazz groups at Hampden Academy. They perform a wide variety of styles ranging from Frank Sinatra to Ray Lamontange. The group was created to give students an opportunity to perform in an ensemble that will allow them to perform in the music industry beyond high school.

Poetry Out Loud is organized nationally by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation and administered at the state level by the MAC. POL encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Since it began, millions of students at more than 7,300 schools nationwide have participated. This great program also gives students an opportunity to master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage.

Recently students had the opportunity to work with two award winning Maine poets, Megan Grumbling and Gibson Fay-LeBlanc during an online workshop. It was a outstanding learning session where students had a chance to practice and receive feedback on their recitations.

Online POL workshop

Online POL workshop

The Maine State Finals for POL will be held on March 15, Waterville Opera House, 3 PM TODAY – open to the public, no cost! Jennifer Rooks, Public Affairs Host and Producer at Maine Public Broadcasting Network (MPBN), will serve as the event’s emcee.

For more information about Maine’s POL program, please visit http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/POL-Home or contact Argy Nestor, Maine Arts Commission Director of Arts Education at argy.nestor@maine.gov or 207-287-2713.

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Poetry Out Loud

September 18, 2015

What’s it all about?

Recitation and performance are major new trends in poetry. There has been a recent resurgence of poetry as an oral art form, as seen in the slam poetry movement and the immense popularity of hip-hop music among our youth. Poetry Out Loud (POL) builds on this momentum by inviting the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, spoken word, and theater into the English class. The National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation have formed a partnership with state arts agencies to support the expansion of POL, which encourages the nation’s youth to learn about great poetry through memorization and performance. This exciting program helps students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence and learn about their literary heritage. Registration is open to all public, private, parochial and home school high schools in Maine.

The competition itself is organized nationally by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation and administered at the state level by the Maine Arts Commission (MAC). It begins in Maine’s schools where school champions are selected to compete in two regional finals at which ten students are ultimately selected to appear at the state final. One student moves on from the state final to represent Maine at the national finals in Washington D.C., where students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico will compete for a total of $50,000 in awards and school stipends for the purchase of poetry books.

This week kicks off POL in Maine by inviting teachers and schools to consider participating. If you or your school are interested in participating please go to the POL webpage on the MAC website at http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/POL-Home.

Please email argy.nestor@maine.gov if you have any questions.

Last year was the 10-year anniversary of POL. In celebration the MAC created a video of the State Finals which was held at the Waterville Opera House. We invited the former state champs to participate and were thrilled that 2 returned and the others voices were included in the event. You can view the video below that was created. And, yes that is the Messalonskee High School Jazz Band who opened the performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XST7EdC3qQ

 

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