Posts Tagged ‘Portland Museum of Art’

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Portland Museum of Art

February 3, 2017

Open house

The Portland Museum of Art invites you to their free open house on Saturday, February 4, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. They’ve completing changes to the museum and they’d like you to see if first. All are welcome at no cost!

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You’re invited… for an all-day Open House with free admission for everyone to the Portland Museum of Art. Gallery talks with community members, and all-ages games and art-making activities. Explore an entirely new PMA and discover the strength and new visual presentation of the museum’s collection, which features 20% more art on view—often in new and surprising places—themed galleries, and interactive, multimedia kiosks.

These events also mark the public openings of the museum’s spring exhibitions: The Thrill of the Chase: The Wagstaff Collection of Photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum, The Mistress and the Muse: Selections from the Isabelle and Scott Black Collection, and Artist’s Choice: Photographs from the Judy Glickman Lauder Collection.

Activities throughout the day include:
Community Highlights Catalog – Reimagine your favorite work of art in the PMA. Using a variety of drawing and collage materials, create your own version of your favorite work in the collection and leave it behind to be added into our community-created highlights catalog.
Community Voices – We are inviting community members to share personal responses to their favorite work in the collection. Hear unique 15-minute perspectives on the collection.

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For more information please contact Louisa Donelson at ldonelson@portlandmuseum.org or call 207.699.4885.

Admission for the Community Open House is courtesy of TD Bank and TD Charitable Foundation.

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Big Fun Friday

November 21, 2016

What a day!

I had the pleasure of participating in three very different events last Friday. The STEM Summit, the 3-day reading of Moby Dick, and an amazing dance performance at Thornton Academy.

STEM SUMMIT

screen-shot-2016-11-21-at-9-04-05-pmMy morning started at Colby College at the STEM Summit “Building Bridges: Developing Partnerships to Build Capacity for STEM Education in Maine”. I was a member of a panel including Lindsey Pinchbeck, SweetTree Arts; Brett Elwell, EverFi; Hannah Walden, Maine Central Institute; Kate Cook Whitt, Thomas College; and Eva Szillery, Maine Mathematics Science and Engineering Talent Search. The session was called “Addressing STEM From Differing Perspectives for Students” and below is the description. I had the chance to share some of the amazing Maine arts educators work happening in STEAM in Maine!!

Designing engaging STEM learning experiences cannot be done through one-size-fits all approaches. This panel showcases the wide variety of ways learners can access STEM, through the arts, sports, coding, and others. Learn about the opportunities that are available to Maine’s teachers and how you can participate in these innovative approaches to STEM learning and teaching.

Irwin Gratz

Irwin Gratz

PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART

From there I headed south to the Portland Museum of Art to participate in the three-day non-stop reading of the classic Moby Dick. It was fun and a fairly intense experience. We had to read from the book that they provided. For those of you who have read the book the language can be challenging and the sentences a mile long. It has been some time since I read to my own sons or my middle school students so reading out loud felt like a new experience. By the end my eyes were bouncing!

Interestingly enough, from PBS radio, Irwin Gratz read not to long before my scheduled 10 minutes. And, not long after me Julie Richard read. What I loved most but wasn’t able to appreciate it (since I was looking down to follow along in the book) was behind the reader on the large screen were rotating images of a graphic novel of Moby Dick.

FALL INTO DANCE

img_4394My last stop of the day was at Thornton Academy in Saco for the Fall Into Dance concert. Participating schools: Thornton Academy, Berwick Academy, Studio for the Living Arts, Collective Motion, Community Dance Project, New England Dance Project. Last years performance raised $2,650 and the funding was awarded to MSAD #33 for a dance education residency which will take place in two weeks. I was stunned when I read on the giant check the amount of $3575.00. Look for the information in the future and begin conversations with your colleagues about possibilities of having a teaching artist at your school next school year.

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Announcing the amount of $3575.00 being given to the Maine Arts Commission to disperse as a dance education grant.

 

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Portland Museum of Art

November 10, 2016

Educational opportunities

Great stuff happening in the near future at the Portland Museum of Art that you don’t want to miss!

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  1. Portland’s first ever Moby-Dick Marathon Reading. On Thursday, November 17, the PMA kicks off a four-day, marathon-style reading of Herman Melville’s masterpiece in the Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium. The book will be read (and perhaps on some cases, performed!) aloud by curators, artists, fishermen and women, writers, students, business leaders, special guests, and more. CLICK HERE for more details.
  2. shrunken-treasures-cover_scott-nashPMA Family Day with Scott Nash. Illustrator, author, and designer Scott Nash visits to share drawing tips and tricks. These workshops encourage kids and their grown-ups to experiment with unique sketching techniques—including some that Scott even uses when imagining and illustrating his books such as Shrunken Treasures. After the art-making, visit the exhibition Of Whales in Paint: Rockwell Kent’s Moby-Dick to explore how various artists and writers across time have represented the iconic story of Moby-Dick. CLICK HERE for more details.
  3. Now on view Kent, Matisse, and more… In the 1930s the pioneering French artist Henri Matisse began to produce book illustrations and artist books. Over the next two decades, he completed a dozen book projects, working with a variety of printing techniques to explore the relationship between image and text—both visually and thematically. This exhibition, provided by the Bank of America Art in our Communities program, presents four of Matisse’s art books, revealing the artist’s dynamic and multifaceted relationship with literature, creativity, and visual expression. CLICK HERE to learn more.matisse_brand
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Portland Museum of Art

September 30, 2016

Two opportunities

Polly Apfelbaum (United States, born 1955), Night Flowering, 2009, multicolor woodblock print on paper, 16 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Durham Press.

Polly Apfelbaum (United States, born 1955), Night Flowering, 2009, multicolor woodblock print on paper, 16 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Durham Press.

IN CONVERSATION: CONNECTING PAINTING AND PRINTMAKING
Saturday, October 1, 3 p.m.
Free for members, MECA students, and Skowhegan School of
Painting and Scultpure alumni, $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

Since 1964, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Scultpure has brought together diverse and talented groups of artists for concentrated periods of artistic creation, interaction, and growth. In the spirit of the discursive environment of Skowhegan’s rural Maine campus, artist Polly Apfelbaum (Skowhegan resident faculty, 1999) and art historian Faye Hirsch will engage in a conversation inspired by the PMA exhibition Skowhegan at Seventy. Join us in exploring how the printmaking process sparks a spirit of inquiry and experimentation in the studio, and delve into the intersection between printmaking and painting in contemporary practice.

Pre-registration strongly encouraged. Click here for tickets.

Henri Matisse, (France, 1869 - 1954), Icare (Icarus) 8 of 20 in "Jazz" (detail), 1947, stencil, lithograph, pochoir on arches, 16 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches. Ex2.2016.9. Bank of America Collection. 2016 Succession H. Matisse/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Henri Matisse, (France, 1869 – 1954), Icare (Icarus) 8 of 20 in “Jazz” (detail), 1947, stencil, lithograph, pochoir on arches, 16 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches. Ex2.2016.9. Bank of America Collection. 2016 Succession H. Matisse/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

BOOK ARTS: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Friday October 21, 4 p.m.
Free for members and MECA students; $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

The vast world of book arts spans from the medieval bookbinding and letterpress tradition to today’s installation art; limited edition, hand-made books; modern novel constructions. Join us to explore the history of book arts, the nuances of the realtionships between the visual and textual, and the various printing and writing processes.

Moderated by Yale’s Jae Jennifer Rossman and featuring panelists Susan Webster, Stuart Kestenbaum, and Rebecca Goodale.

Pre-registration encouraged. Click here for tickets.

 

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Teen Opportunity PMA

May 18, 2016

­Portland Museum of Art (PMA)

The PMA has an interesting summer fellowship position available for a teenager. The position lasts 7 weeks, for a total of approximately 105 hours, July 11 to August 26. If you are an educator who knows of a student who may be interested in this type of opportunity please share this link with them and encourage them to apply. 

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Position: Homer High School Fellow

Department: Learning and Interpretation

Division: Audience Engagement and Communications

Reports To: Associate Educator for Youth Learning

GENERAL SUMMARY

Under the general supervision of the Associate Educator for Youth Learning, this position offers high school students the opportunity to learn about the museum profession through the development of youth and teen programs. This seven-week fellowship program is designed to foster creative thinking, to build community, and to use the PMA collection for inspiration and idea building. The Homer High School Fellow will be one of eight fellows who will collaborate on projects and programs.

ESSENTIAL JOB FUNCTIONS

  • Creates new ways for teen audiences to engage with the museum and its works of art through the creation of interpretative materials and programs.
  • Participates in discussions about ways in which PMA programming could attract teen audiences.
  • Assists Learning and Interpretation staff in design and execution of drop-in art activities for youth, teen, and family audiences.
  • Attends PMA public programs (artist and curator talks, daily tours, etc.) to learn about the museum’s collection and exhibitions and to better understand how the museum makes the collection and exhibitions accessible to the public.
  • Participates in visits to working artists’ studios and the National Convening for Teens in the Arts at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.
  • Participates in a visit to the Winslow Homer Studio at Prouts Neck to learn about the importance of place in Homer’s work, and to link the process of observing with the process of creating.
  • Works on special projects in the Learning and Interpretation department with museum staff serving as mentors.
  • Complies with all Portland Museum of Art safety rules and procedures.
  • Regular attendance at the workplace is required.

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITY

None

EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE

Applicants must be rising high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • A high school student highly motivated in the visual arts.
  • Comfortable working with museum visitors of all ages, including children, teens, and adults.
  • Strong interpersonal skills.
  • Ability to work both independently and cooperatively with coworkers and a variety of individuals contacted in the course of work.
  • Interest in working with children.
  • Ability to handle sensitive and confidential information with discretion.
  • Ability to pass a criminal background check.
  • Ability to obtain a work permit if under 16 years old.

Internship Period and Hours

Tentatively July 11 through August 26, 2016

The Homer High School Fellows will work at the PMA and offsite daily for a total of approximately 105 hours. Tentatively, five hours a day for three days a week. Some weekend and evening hours required.

WORKING CONDITIONS AND PHYSICAL DEMANDS

A majority of the work is performed in a museum or gallery setting or in a normal office environment not subject to extremes of noise, temperature, odor, etc. Operates computer, printer, photocopier, and other office equipment. Uses various hand tools, art supplies, and paper cutters. Local and regional travel required.

TERMS

The Homer High School Fellow position is a temporary part-time, hourly, non-exempt, employment-at-will position. Work is tentatively scheduled for July 11, 2016 – August 26, 2016, the specific schedule to be determined. The Homer High School Fellows will work at the PMA and offsite daily for a total of approximately 105 hours. Tentatively, five hours a day for three days a week. Some weekend and evening hours required.

APPLY

Please submit completed PMA Application for Employment and Supplementary application for Homer High School Fellows (available at the website) http://www.portlandmuseum.org/about/employ.shtml to HHSF.pma.042016@portlandmuseum.org or mail to Business Manager, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square, Portland, ME 04101. The deadline for applications is June 5, 2016.

The Portland Museum of Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants shall receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, sex, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, veteran status, status as a whistleblower, or any other basis prohibited by applicable law.

 

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Maine Art Education YAM Exhibits

February 26, 2016

Two shows – two locations

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Rose Davis, Grade 8, Mt. Ararat Middle School

Portland: For more than 20 years, the Portland Museum of Art (PMA) has collaborated with the Maine Art Education Association to celebrate student artwork with the Youth Art Month exhibit. This annual observance emphasizes the value of art education and encourages support for quality school art programs. At the PMA, this annual event comes with a reception and an exhibition that showcases artwork in a variety of media by K-12 students throughout the state.

Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 8.23.07 PMThis year marks the 22nd annual exhibition and features artwork by more than 100 students. The opening is scheduled for Saturday, March 5, 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the PMA. There is no cost to attend. It is always a treat to see the student work displayed in the museum.

 

Presentation of Certificates:
4:30 p.m.: grades K, 1, 2, 3 certificates
5:30 p.m.: grades 4, 5, 6, 7 certificates
6:30 p.m.: grades 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 certificates

Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 8.22.58 PMAugusta: The Maine Education Association and Maine Art Education Association are once again partnering to celebrate Youth Art Month. Thirty pieces of artwork will be on display. The opening of the show will be on Sunday, March 6, 1:00 to 2:30.

Presentations will be at 1:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

 

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Introducing Jenn DePrizio

May 25, 2015

Director of Learning and Interpretation – Portland Museum of Art

jdeprizioheadshot1Recently, I had the opportunity to have a wonderful conversation with Jenn DePrizio, the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the Portland Museum of Art. This blog post provides you the chance to learn about Jenn and some of the work she is doing at the museum.

Please tell the Maine Arts Education blog readers about your background.

As an undergraduate studying art history, I didn’t even know museum education was a career option. I knew that I loved that learning about art of the past. I started in the classics department, but after a debacle in Greek class, I became an art history major. Art could convey ideas, beliefs, and political propaganda. Works of art can be both windows, offering a view beyond one’s self, and mirrors, providing a reflection of one’s self. Through my study of art history, I learned about not only the past, times and places different than my own, but also about myself and how I fit into the world. I thought, “This is so cool. How can I share this with others?” And then I learned from an intern supervisor, who is now my best friend, that I could make a career out of that desire! So off I went to George Washington University and got a Masters of Arts in Teaching in Museum Education. Before coming to the PMA, I worked at the Vermont Historical Society, Worcester Art Museum, J. Paul Getty Museum, and most recently Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. At each of these museums my main focus was on gallery teaching and creating engaging gallery experiences for visitors of all ages. I look forward to finding ways to continue this work in Portland, making the PMA a place of discovery, innovation and excitement in terms of gallery learning.

Why did you want to leave Massachusetts and move to Maine?

I have always loved Maine as a visitor and in particular Portland. For me, quality of life is an important factor in making decisions about my professional life. My husband and I were looking for a place to raise our young daughter. We wanted to live in a place that combined all the benefits of a city (including good restaurants and bars—for a number of years before having my daughter I wrote a cocktail blog), with a relaxed atmosphere and connection to nature. This past weekend as we enjoyed our lobster rolls and haddock sandwiches out at the Five Island Lobster Co., we were reassured that we made the right choice in moving to Maine.

Describe your responsibilities as the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the Portland Museum of Art.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 5.43.31 PMAs the Director of Learning and Interpretation at the PMA, I am responsible for developing enriching and engaging opportunities for visitors of all ages to engage with authentic works of art. A big part of that work since I have come on board at the PMA has been exploring who the museum’s audiences are currently and thinking deeply about who are the audiences that we are not reaching. Hanging over my desk, I have written a quote by David Carr that reads, “Museums aren’t for everyone. But they should be for anyone.” How can we make the museum accessible to anyone who may be inclined to want to explore art and creativity with us?

One of the greatest challenges for museum’s today is meeting the changing needs and expectation of today’s audience, while remaining true to one’s intellectual integrity and institution’s mission. Many museum-goers are savvy cultural consumers who expect to benefit from the museum’s expertise. They also want to be actively engaged and to be given the freedom to chose and organize their own experience. There are also a great number of Americans who do not approach museums with the same comfort level and sense that museums as vital places of learning and engagement. For many, museums are intimidating and a visit can be daunting, overwhelming and frustrating if they are not provided with basic orientation and safe entry points to begin to look closely and make meaning of the works of art. It is my responsibility to work collaboratively with my colleagues across the museum to ensure that the needs of both these types of visitors are considered and planned for.

What are the goals of art education programs at the Portland Museum of Art?

I am fortunate to have a dedicated and thoughtful team at the PMA to work with on a daily basis. Together we strive to encourage curiosity and wonder for visitors to the PMA. By offering audiences of all ages opportunities to connect with authentic works of art through programs that offer open-ended experiences, intellectual rigor and exploration of the creative process, we hope that we can impact the lives of PMA audiences. A successful art education program may look a little different depending on the audience and the activity. But if I were to imagine an ideal scene in the galleries that signaled success, here is what I would see and hear: Visitors would be looking closely at works of art. There would be times of quiet contemplation and moments of boisterous conversation. Visitors would share observations, possible interpretations, while the docent or staff would find ways to build on those ideas. Perhaps most important of all, visitors would wonder aloud, they would ask questions, they would speculate. Through that curiosity their connection to the work of art and the world around them would expand.

I believe that art museums can change people’s lives. As museum educators, my team and I have a chance to contribute to the vitality of our community by connecting art of the past and the work of living artists with contemporary issues relevant to our visitors. In working with varied audiences—school children and teachers, teens, families, adults, docents, museum members, tourists—we then craft programs that meet the individual needs of each.

Since many of your readers are classroom teachers, I can talk a bit more about our goals related to K-12 students and teachers. Currently, we serve about 7,000 students through our school tour program, but we could be serving many more. I hope that teachers know that visits to the PMA are free for them and their students.

Moving forward we will be building programs that promote the primacy of the in-gallery experience. What is unique about the experience that students can have at the PMA? By looking at and talking about works of art, students can develop their looking and critical thinking skills. Having seen the positive impact firsthand, I am huge proponent of Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) and am exploring ways we strengthen our programs using this teaching approach. Because VTS is grounded in research and developmental theory, it is rare as a pedagogy in that it begins with the learner and the questions they have, not the information that we, as adults, think is relevant to the students. The students guide the discussion to what they are wondering about, and the teacher is there to help them get to where they want to go. And the listening skills, the empathy and respect for others that VTS teaches connects back to the idea I was talking about earlier—the work of the L&I department at the PMA can impact the lives of our visitors in profound ways.

If you were given $500,000 to do whatever you please, what would it be?

While there are so many ideas I have, the first thing I would do with such a trove of money would be to make the museum free to all visitors. For many the financial barrier is a serious one, and to truly impact our community we need to eliminate as many barriers as we can. Art should be accessible to everyone. In the words of William Morris, “I do not want art for a few, any more than education for a few, or freedom for a few.”

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