Posts Tagged ‘St. Agatha/Frenchville’

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Another Arts Teacher’s Story: Charles Michaud

March 28, 2017

MALI Teacher Leaders Series

This is the fifth blog post of the Phase 6 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader stories. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about the work each Maine visual or performing arts teacher or artist is doing.  CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 81 Teacher Leaders plus 4 Teaching Artist Leaders.  CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE  for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. There have been 75 posted to date. Thank you Charles for sharing your story!

Charles Michaud is the Pre-K – 12 music teacher at MSAD#33 in Frenchville and St. Agatha, MSAD#33 has a little less than 200 students and is located on the northern border of the state.  Charles teaches general music for grades Pre-K – 6, and offers band for students from grades 4 – 6.  This is his third year teaching at Wisdom Middle/High School and Dr. Levesque Elementary School.

What do you like best about being a music educator?

In my opinion, the best part of being a music educator are the moments when learners surprise themselves by playing or singing something impressive. They light up and gain a whole new confidence in themselves.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

  1. Accessibility: Learners need opportunities to access the arts. While this seems like common sense from an outsider’s perspective, we all know the challenges of fitting in the schedule.
  2. Customization: A program that adapts to the abilities of the students requires customizing lessons and materials to meet the learning styles and speeds of the learners. I think that the best way to draw students into the arts is to make the arts theirs.
  3. Appropriateness: Every arts program exists within the context of the community. Make sure the goals of the program not only provides access to the broader arts world, but also has deep roots in the musical culture of the area. Many programs try to adapt the local culture to fit their music, but I think a successful program draws the community in by drawing the local musical culture into the program.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Assessment is a big cog in the learning machine. Assessment is communication about learning, and plays an essential role in my classroom.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership initiative?

MALI has given me access to a community of arts educators on the cutting edge of their disciplines. Our collaborations and conversations have pushed me to innovate as an arts educator, which has been all to the benefit of my students.

What are you most proud of in your career?

The strength of community in my band is what has made me the most proud in my short career.  In the end, I find that what keeps students coming back year after year is that band is their home away from home.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

My biggest barrier to becoming a better teacher is a lack of time for developing all of the cool new lessons and methods that I would like to try. Imagine what a few solid weeks of straight lesson planning could do for a teacher!

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

Increasing the numbers in the music program has been my challenge since year one. I have been very successful in this regard, but it could easily be attributed to the great students that we have in our district.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Work hard and be innovative, because proficiency based education can present some very unique opportunities for the arts.

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

If my program received 500k, I would create a position that bridges the gap from arts in school and arts in the community. This would connect my students with authentic learning experiences, and give them a model context for their role in the local arts scene.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

I have a long road to travel before I hit 94, so I will almost inevitably regret something. For now, however, I am very content with the choices that I have made. Fingers crossed!

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Aroostook Mall Art Exhibit

March 20, 2017

Northern pARTners

Mackenzie Vigue and Delanie Cyr of Mapleton Elementary School

The Northern pARTners, Aroostook County regional art teachers, held a reception at the Aroostook Centre Mall on Thursday, March 9th from 7-7:30pm. Students from all around Aroostook County gathered to celebrate and showcase student artwork for the Essence of the North annual YAM(Youth Art Month) art show.

There were eleven county school districts represented including Presque Isle/Mapleton, Fort Fairfield, Limestone, Caribou, Ashland, Washburn, Connor, Hodgdon, Houlton, Mars Hill, and St. Agatha/Frenchville.

The Aroostook Centre Mall graciously donated space again this year for hanging the show. Vibrant colors and stunning examples of student artistic talents and skills filled the room as county art educators put up their student work.

Student artists accompanied by family and friends filled the gallery space from 6:45-7:45 Thursday evening. The visual appeal of the exhibit is an experience one wouldn’t want to miss. This was evident on reception night as people of all ages excitedly traveled around the exhibit.

Jack Boone of Zippel Elementary School

Beth Walker, Washburn art educator, provided a scavenger hunt which has student artists and their families studying the artworks looking for 2 clues in each district’s collection. They check off if they found the clue and write down the district where it was found. Stacy Ramsey, art educator from Hodgdon, created a visual scavenger hunt for her younger students. Students had to find photo images that she had photographed and printed off.

Despite the blustery weather conditions, it was an exciting evening meeting, greeting, and praising the students and their art work.

The northern pARTners are very appreciative and thankful to the Aroostook Centre Mall for providing this opportunity to display artwork from school districts around the county.

The artwork will be on display from February 28 through March 31st.

 

Abby Collins of Zippel Elementary School

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