Posts Tagged ‘visual art education’

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Maine Farmland Trust

March 8, 2021

Opportunity for children

Young artists age 18 and under are invited to submit farm-inspired artwork for an upcoming virtual gallery exhibit.

The Maine Farmland Trust welcomes submissions for a children’s art exhibit to be held virtually this spring through the MFT Gallery. Looking for children’s artistic creations that address or are inspired by any of the following questions:

  • Do you have any farm or farm stands near you?
  • What do they look like, and what do they produce?
  • What animals do you like on the farm?
  • What is your favorite food from the farm?
  • What do you like, or what would you like, to do on a visit to the farm? 

Learn and submit artwork HERE. DEADLINE: MARCH 28, 2021

Possible subject or media matter ideas: Vegetables; animals on the farm; fiber (sheep, llamas or alpacas, rabbits); barns or other farm buildings; fields, crops, gardens; helpers on the farm; tractors or other equipment and tools.

Submission guidelines:

The artwork can be any media, 2D or 3D. We are accepting up to 5 submissions per artist. Since the show will be virtual, all submissions should be high quality photos of the original artwork.

Tips for taking a high quality photo with your camera or phone: use a high resolution setting on your device; hold the device steady or use a tripod or brace so the image is clear, not blurry; place the work (one at a time for multiple submissions) in good, even, natural lighting; make sure the edges of the image are square to the edges of the work so there is no distortion; crop the image to clear any distracting background; save as a .jpg file.

Please send an email, subject Farms for ME, with up to 5 high resolution jpg images attached, labeled with Artist First Name_Age_Title of the work_medium_dimensions_price.

In the email please include parent’s full name, email address, and phone number, name of the artist, age, medium, title of the work, dimensions of the work, and price if the work is for sale (or NFS if not).

If you have questions please contact Karen at karen@mainefarmlandtrust.org

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Union of Maine Visual Artists

February 2, 2021

Journal Winter 2021

The Union of Maine Visual Artists (UMVA) represents visual artists statewide in all fields of endeavor and welcomes those who support contemporary artists in Maine. The UMVA is dedicated to upholding the dignity of artists, while creating positive social change through the arts. By collaborating with other cultural and progressive organizations, we raise awareness for significant issues while promoting an inclusive arts community in Maine.

The winter edition of the Union of Maine Visual Artists journal includes a piece on the Open Art Teachers Studio. The article was written by Bronwyn Sale, Martha Piscuskas, Iva Damon, and Melanie Crowe and describes the opportunity for art teachers to come together for five sessions and create art together for an hour each time. One participant said: “It was good to see people’s faces and to feel connected.” We know how difficult it can be to feel connected to others and during the pandemic that has been highlighted even more. It was wonderful that Open Art Teachers Studio provided a chance to come together, make and share art, and know that the community is there. READ the entire article.

Melanie Crowe, Fish Back in Water, 2020
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Getting There, Part III

December 11, 2020

MECA MAT students

This is Part III of a blog post about the Masters in Arts and Teaching (MAT) students at Maine College of Art (MECA). Together with Part I and Part II you can get a snapshot of their program this fall. Students presented their work in an exhibit called “Getting There“, November 28 – December 7 at the college in Portland. The last two days of Maine Arts Ed blog posts include images from the show, their thoughts on visual art education, and their role as artists and future teachers. It also includes their successes and challenges, and their hopes for the future, post pandemic. I hope I am able to have a more personal conversation with this group of people in the near future. They have so much to offer, are is very articulate and thoughtful, and are bright lights during this dark time.

These MAT voices are strong and I’m sure you’ll agree with me that the future is in good hands. I’ve mentioned over the years how important our role is as educators to mentor, encourage and seek out the future teachers to insure that arts education continues moving forward to provide an excellent education for all students. Here is an opportunity for veteran teachers – read and listen carefully and if you’re inclined, reach out to these students.

In the Part I post there are examples of each students work. In Part II you can hear their voices and below are the responses to questions that I asked the students.

What do you see going on or what are you doing right now (in the midst of Covid) that is so dynamic and creative and alive that you hope doesn’t go away once Covid does?

  • Even though so much of education and the world is in a precarious state, the pandemic is helping me realize how important grounding learning with an arts education is for kids. I’m happy that there’s new energy being channeled into making education more accessible for everyone, and it’s amazing to be in a cohort of teacher candidates as we are all so eager to bring fresh perspectives to classrooms. ~ Philippa Grace, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Sculpture, 2016
  • Education and healthcare seem to be never quite completely accessible. During the pandemic, when everything moved online, we evolved in creating tools of still allowing these things to happen and even flourish virtually. Though an end to the pandemic seems to be in the foreseeable future, I hope to see a continued mix of virtual and in person experience. It allows for more voice and choice. School and doctors are more accessible to those without cars through virtual platforms and if we made decent internet connection a necessity, we could be a lot more productive and connected from within our homes where we are most comfortable. ~ Audrey Robidoux, Maine College of Art
  • Oh gosh great question! I have caught myself noticing the present SO much more- the color of a meadow this fall after a recent rainfall, how this random lady sitting on a bench laughed exactly the same way that my roommate does, the soul settling experience of paddling in a canoe on a lake. I hope to maintain this awe of the moment, (and teach others to do the same!) once quarantining ends. ~Sophie Olmsted, Bates College, Lewison, Studio Art (ceramics), 2018
  • I don’t think I’m doing anything in my personal life that I hope continues after Covid. I do see a silver lining when it comes to my teaching practice. I was blessed enough to get a teaching job that both supplements my student teaching requirements and my wallet during this time. This type of experience would not have happened if it was not for the circumstances that we are in. ~Cooper Binette, Maine College of Art, Portland ME, BFA in painting 2020
  • Refining skills as an artist and a teacher is my life’s work. I am grateful for the time and opportunity to study at Maine College of Art even if we work remote. Allowing me to continue to create an enriching environment for Maine’s youth. It is during the epidemic that I am able to work harder than I ever have to make this a career. ~Seth Baron, Maine College of Art, BFA in Illustration 2020
  • I unfortunately don’t feel that I have achieved anything so dynamic or exciting that it is going to stick around post Covid. I have found myself feeling trapped inside, and uninspired/overwhelmed due to the stressful climate of my surroundings. One positive thing that has come  out of the situation is that I have had a lot of time to sit and work inside of my sketchbook, something I usually do despite Covid times but it feels very accomplished to be able to sit and just draw for hours while being stuck inside. These sketchbooks will be reminders of this unexpected situation, and bring a sense of accomplishment to these hard times. I will then be able to share this experience with my future students, so I guess you could say there’s a small sliver of a silver lining there. ~Lauren Ashlee Anderson, Maine College of Art, BFA in Ceramics 2020
  • I am feeling so inspired by food right now and have been pouring all of my creative energy into cooking and baking. Since the pandemic began, my partner and I have started growing our own vegetables and herbs and have had a lot more time to experiment with new recipes. I never would have guessed I would be so excited about street corn or heirloom tomatoes! ~Madison Mahoney, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, BA in Studio Art, 2019
  • Unfortunately as of right now, I don’t have any creative and dynamic practices that will stay with me post Covid. My ceramics practice was cut short due to Covid and I do not have the means to continue it right now. In all honesty, I hope for things to go back to a seminormal if/when Covid is gone. The silver lining for me is that I’m thankful to be in the Master’s of Art in Teaching program to become an art educator. I will be able to share my passion for art to students and hope to inspire them to achieve their dreams. ~Shelby Pyrzyk, Maine College of Art, BFA in Ceramics 2020 
  • When Covid first hit back in March, I didn’t make any art for 4 months. I was newly unemployed, broke, and depressed. However, about a month before I moved to Maine from Kentucky, I started doing all these paintings of retro video game covers for my friends, and it helped me rejuvenate my creative confidence. Throughout the MAT program I have been able to keep doing these video game commissions for friends, on top of many other creative endeavors, and so I have been able to sustain that motivation to create, but it wasn’t easy. I think that being an artist during a pandemic has reminded me that there are always ups and downs, but art will always be there for me when I’m ready. ~Trent Redmon, Transylvania University, Lexington, KY, BA in Studio Art 2016
  • Storytelling is very important to my life and work as an artist. Traditionally, I tell my stories through comics and graphic novels. Since Covid, however, I’ve invested myself more in the creation of artifacts and life size set pieces from out of my fictional worlds. I’m hoping in the coming years I continue to expand on the idea of bringing the fictional into the real world. ~Sean Dillon, Eastern University 08-12, Exercise Science

What has it been like jumping from student to teacher while continue to nourish your own creative practices?

  • I audited a porcelain class taught by Cathy Hammond at MECA this fall. When I was a few years younger, I was so afraid of failure, but now that I’m learning about mindfulness and bringing our whole selves to the classroom, I was so eager to show Cathy my failures and ask her “what do I do now?!” I learned so much about the materials just by being in a classroom (albeit masked and distanced!) with BFA students at all levels, and Cathy was always willing to share her decades of ceramics teaching experience with us. It was so powerful to be able to fail in front of her and have that be an empowering experience of growth. ~Philippa Grace (favorite color: orange)
  • The journey from artist to teacher has expanded my perspective on the world. As a working artist, I often felt isolated, deeply buried in late studio nights and internal thought. I love to create but it wasn’t enough. I couldn’t invest every piece of myself into it. I felt as though it wasn’t a sustainable practice for myself or my well being. As much as I loved it, I needed something different, a different purpose. After four years of focusing on the art world, I felt the pull to come to the teaching program. Despite the pandemic, and the upheaval of the world around me, I knew that it was the right decision. ~Audrey Robidoux (favorite color: red)
  •  I see the role of teacher and student as interchangeable hats- in one moment, I may have the teacher hat on, but I’m wearing the student one in the next. Flipping back and forth informs both experiences. I feel so lucky to be a student in my 800 studio class because it reminds me of the student experience- what it is like to not know what’s next, how uncomfortable it can be to not know, how to navigate teacher expectations and social interactions. The MAT program (so far) has been the perfect bridge between feeling mostly student to feeling mostly teacher (I plan to identify as a partial student for the rest of my life). ~Sophie Olmsted (favorite color: lavender)
  • Jumping straight from student to Teacher has been a crazy experience. I’ve had to strengthen my time management skills along with prioritizing my school and teaching over my personal practice without allowing it to fizzle out completely. ~Cooper Binette (favorite color: pastel purple)
  • Starting my practice of teaching has been an incredible new experience. New experiences such as meeting a group of students for the first time will continue to inspire my digital paintings. ~Seth Baron (favorite color: cyan)
  • Jumping from student to teacher while continuing to nourish my creative practices has been a big challenge for me. Coming out of quarantine to this program has to be the biggest challenge. My semester in undergrad was cut short due to Covid so all of my studio privileges unfortunately disappeared. I found myself in a creative slump with a lack of inspiring materials. I have worked my way out of the slump by creating awesome lesson plans for future students, and being able to create art while making lesson plans is exciting. I haven’t made much art for myself, but no matter what I still continue to doodle, work in my sketchbook, and pull from the world around me to inspire me. ~Lauren Ashlee Anderson (favorite color: terra cotta)
  • It has been a transition for sure. Some parts of teaching have come easy to me, while others have been harder to grasp. Jumping into teaching after months of uncertainty and quarantine felt like a huge change of pace. But luckily this cohort has been able to offer me amazing support. I’ll admit, at the start of this program I found myself neglecting my creative practice. That quickly shifted when we were given the opportunity to join a BFA class to continue our making. It felt amazing to be back in the studio and since I have gained back more of my creative energy that had been lost in quarantine. ~Madison Mahoney (favorite color: slate blue)
  • It has been interesting but I like the transition because I am able to apply my knowledge from when I was a student to what I am doing while teaching. It also has been helpful when creating lesson plans to have experience with some of the media. ~Shelby Pyrzyk (favorite color: teal or pink)
  • It has been challenging to say the least. It requires so much discipline and drive to be able to change gears from academic work, to studio work, and back and forth. It’s taken lots of perseverance. ~Trent Redmon (favorite color: red)
  • Teaching has gradually become a part of my practice as I’ve become closer with my audience.  I started doing art tutorials and live streams for my following a few years ago and educating others has become just another hat I wear. ~Sean Dillon (favorite color: green)

Was there evidence of the teacher as artist or artist as teacher in the show?

  • Getting There is a time capsule of our cohort on the verge of student teaching with our mentors this winter, in the midst of this pandemic. We are all in different stages of discovering the balance of being a teacher and an artist (for me and some other peers, we have been out of school for a few years and are falling back in love with art and school–others are fresh out of their BFA programs). As we have grown together since August learning about art education, I am so grateful to be able to share this space as artists in our field as well. It is a potent reminder for me to never stop making–even as my creative practice shifts and changes, being an artist is what guides my teaching and grounds me. ~Philippa Grace (pronouns: she/they)
  • For my exhibit I created a sketchbook and a curriculum map, tying in all of the sketchbook prompts. It’s designed for high school students, based off a curriculum map that I dreamt up. High school education is a difficult experience in the current society, and art can teach the lifelong lessons of creative and critical thinking. Giving a young adult a sketchbook can awake a childhood passion that seemed lost and change their perspective on life. The sense of individuality that is born within a sketchbook can inspire. Art and creativity is what every student needs in this current world, where we have no idea what the next few years looks like, let alone the rest of our lives. I want to equip my students with skills that will stay with them no matter what path they take. And it takes an artist to teach these concepts. There really is an art to teaching. And I’m getting there. ~Audrey Robidoux (pronouns: she/hers)
  • Yes, absolutely. I made some jars using a technique on the wheel that I had never tried before (or even heard of!). I absolutely plan to make jars in this way again and to teach others to give it a try. The process served as a reminder that you can always learn new ways to do things and you can always teach students to keep looking for those ways of making that spark energy and intrigue. I plan to hold this experience of discovery with me as I step into my role as a teacher. ~Sophie Olmsted (pronouns: she/her)
  • I think there is evidence about the importance of the teacher as an artist in every piece in the shell. The artwork helps bridge the gap between what we are learning in class and what we are practicing in our studios. This information will only benefit our teaching practice. It will make all of our learnings more accessible to both the audience and the artist. ~Cooper Binette (pronouns: he/him)
  • The show contains an array of illustrations, paintings, ceramics and sculptures. All of which are created by some incredibly diverse perspectives inspired by pedagogy based readings and studies. I highly recommend everyone follow meca.mat on instagram to see all of the pieces from the show. ~Seth Baron (pronouns: he/him/his)
  • Getting There is a show depicting each of our individual journeys as artists and future educators. There is both evidence of teacher as artist, and artist as teacher. In my work specifically I have honed in on the idea of “Embracing being a novice”. My work displayed is a variety of new techniques I learned in my BFA class this semester called “The Sculptural Imagination”. As I am learning to be a teacher, I am still continuing to add new tools into my personal tool box that I will carry with me for the rest of my life. These new techniques are now some that I can share with my future students! Embracing being a novice not only means learning new things, but also means that I am learning things I can teach my students in the future.  ~Lauren Ashlee Anderson (pronouns: she/hers)
  • Absolutely. In my work there is evidence of teacher as artist in the way I approach a new material; in this case, porcelain. For this exhibition I focused on play and embracing possibility in a medium that was brand new to me. As a painter, I primarily work 2D, but I wanted to get a feel for how my students might experience a 3D material. I was the only handbuilder in a class of wheel throwers and I wanted my pieces to reflect that. All of my pieces in this show are my firsts and many experiment with balance as well as glazes. ~Madison Mahoney (pronouns: she/her)
  • Our show Getting There is centered around us as both artists and future teachers. We were tasked with continuing or learning a form of art while being able to tie it back to what we are learning in our program. Many of us have highlighted that in the pieces of our work in the show. I feel this show is important to the program to show us that we can continue our art practices while still being teachers. ~Shelby Pyrzyk (pronouns: she/hers)
  • There is definitely evidence of that in our show. Just going around reading everyone’s artist statements is evidence that everyone put a ton of thought into what they made. Everyone’s perspective is so different, but all the work is still unified by our dual perspectives as both artists and teachers. ~Trent Redmon (pronouns: he/him/his)
  • It’s a subtle message, you really have to look into the details of my piece to decode the artist-teacher relationship.  For me the piece is more of a physical waypoint in a mostly spiritual journey to become a teacher. ~Sean Dillon (pronouns: he/him)
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Edutopia

November 14, 2018

Maine art educator

Carol Shutt retired in June after 27 wonderful years as the K-8 art teacher at Mount Desert Elementary School in Northeast Harbor. Congratulations to Carol for her article that was recently published in Edutopia called Making an Event out of ArtThe piece is about the annual Arts Week (20 years) and suggestions on how to plan for one.

You can read an interview with Carol posted last February on this blog.

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Haystack

September 19, 2017

MAEA Fall Conference

Almost 100 visual art educators traveled to Deer Isle Maine for the annual 3-day conference. Some had to drive 5 hours to get there. When I reach the bridge over to the island and smell the salt air and see the seabirds flying, I know whoever has made the long trip, doesn’t question its worth. The conference is held at the beautiful Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and sponsored by the Maine Art Education Association (MAEA). The organization stands on the shoulders of giants and many of those names were mentioned over the weekend.

MALI Teacher Leaders

THANK YOU

A HUGE THANK YOU to Carolyn Brown for chairing the conference and to all of the Maine Art Education board members and the organization members who volunteer to do the hours of work to make the conference so wonderful!

HIGHLIGHTS

  • A GREAT learning opportunity
  • Delicious food
  • Beautiful environment
  • Opportunity to meet art teachers from across the state
  • Amazing people who are open to sharing, exchanging ideas, and providing support
  • A wonderful feeling of community

Yes, that is guacamole

Comments

  • The opportunity to learn is amazing; like no other that I have
  • I get to feel what my students feel while learning something new
  • I look around and wonder if my art is good enough and I remember we’re all in this together
  • What an opportunity to push my limits
  • I’m learning at full speed
  • Now I can go back to my school feeling totally nourished

Workshop offerings

  • Expanding Your Fiber Universe: Lissa Hunter

  • Block Printmaking – Balance and Texture: Holly Berry

  • Exploring the Basics of BronzClay Jewelry Fabrication: Nisa Smiley

  • Visual Journaling: Sandy Weisman

  • Making Animal Sculptures with Clay using Enclosed Forms and Additions: Tim Christensen

  • Bringing Digital Fabrication into your Curriculum: Elliot Clapp

  • Experimental Watercolor Painting: Erica Qualey

  • Past to Present: Personal Found Object Assemblage Inspired by Shrines, Alters, and Reliquaries: Stephanie Leonard and Suzanne Southworth

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In Today’s News

April 12, 2017

Collaborative work

PATHS students with some of the fence parts.

This is a very large collaborative project underway with the Wentworth School in Scarborough and the welding students at Portland Arts and Technology High School (PATHS). There are 32 students from 12 sending schools taking part from PATHS. This is a great example of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math). The students are creating a fence for the existing school garden that will become a gallery for outdoor art and science projects. Art teacher Joanne Maloney is involved along with the teachers who teach the STEM subjects.  Some of the work will focus on kinesthetic, or tactile learning, and movement.

Close up of a flower on the fence.

Later on in May teaching artist Ann Thompson will work with Wentworth students to create wire sculptures for display on the fence.

The coordination of the idea has been enormous, involving many adults and students, and a wonderful example of collaboration.

To read the entire article from The Forecaster written by Kate Irish Collins, April 3, 2017, please CLICK HERE.

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MLTI Artwork Challenge

December 21, 2016

Photographs needed – Deadline: January 16, 2017

The Singularity, Dante DesVeaux, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 10 (2016-17 screen saver)

The Singularity, Dante DesVeaux, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 10 (2016-17 screen saver)

The MLTI Screensaver Challenge is currently open. Please read all the guidelines below and on the links. Guidelines located at THIS LINK. If you have any questions please contact Juanita Dickson.

Over the last eight years, the MLTI device has featured screen savers featuring outstanding student works of art (twenty each year). To date, there have been well over two thousand pieces of artwork submitted representing PK-12. With the variety of devices available at MLTI, images are now made available as a download for either a screensaver or background image on every MLTI device.

The students whose artwork is selected will have their artwork featured on the Big Screen at the MLTI Student Conference to be held May 25, 2017. The 20 artists will be receiving free conference registration and their artwork featured on 2017-2018 MLTI devices. Student’s artwork will be printed and displayed at the Department of Education during the summer of 2017.

All artwork should be submitted by an adult using our Google drive and Google forms. Complete directions can be found here.

Ocean Breeze, Taylor Fitzpatrick, Houlton Middle School, Grade 6 (2016-17 screen saver)

Ocean Breeze, Taylor Fitzpatrick, Houlton Middle School, Grade 6 (2016-17 screen saver)

MLTI Student Artwork Challenge Timeline
January 16, 2017 – Submissions due.
January 17 – February 10, 2017 – Selection committee reviews submissions using a rubric.
February 13, 2017 – Teachers of the students with selected pieces will be notified by this date. A release form will need to be signed by parents and sent back to MLTI before any names are released to the public.
February 22, 2017 – Release forms due to back to the MLTI Project Office
Late February 2017 – Selected artwork information released to the public.
May 25, 2017 – Student Conference. Selected students will be invited to join us at the Student Conference free of charge (students will need to complete online registration)

DEADLINE: January 16, 2017.  Guidelines located at THIS LINK. If you have any questions please contact Juanita Dickson.

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In Today’s News

November 10, 2016

Student artist debuts in SoBoArts show

screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-4-11-47-pm

Marshwood art teacher Jeff Vinciguerra and student Sarah MacDonald look at some of her pottery.

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — Sarah MacDonald’s passion is making clay pots, and she dreams of a successful career as a ceramics artist. MacDonald, a senior at Marshwood High School, is getting a crash course in entrepreneurship, learning how to exhibit and sell her work.

Read the entire article from seacoastonline by CLICKING HERE.

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MLTI Screensavers

March 26, 2016

Selected artwork

Twenty student artists will have an audience of more thank 70,000 students and educators for their artwork. The results are in! The following 20 images will be found on 2016-2017 MLTI devices and from June 1, 2016 thru August 31, 2016, they will be on display in frames around the Department of Education!! Congratulations to the following students!!

Moshier Island w/Fog, Maximo Steverlynck-Horne, Freeport Middle School, Grade 8

Moshier Island w/Fog, Maximo Steverlynck-Horne, Freeport Middle School, Grade 8

“I Spy”, Haydn LaDeau, Deer Isle Stonington High School, Grade 12
“Moshier Island w/Fog”, Maximo Steverlynck-Horne, Freeport Middle School, Grade 8
“Pensive”, Ruth Metcalf, Middle School of the Kennebunks, Grade 7
“HorsePower”, Ryan Bent, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 11
“Playin the Blues”, Cory Richards, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 10
“Polygons”, Dana Clarito, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 12
“The Singularity”, Dante DesVeaux, Mount Desert Island High School, Grade 10
“Connections”, Sophia DeSchiffart, Narraguagus High School, Grade 10
“Spider Lake Perspective”, Cassidy Osgood, Narraguagus High School, Grade 12
“We Have Takeoff”, Bobbi Grant, Southern Aroostook Community School, Grade 9
“Cherries”, Nicholas David, Freeport High School, Grade 11
“Elephant”, Lauren Briggs, Freeport High School, Grade 12
“Fall”, Ella Russell, Freeport High School, Grade 12
“Piano Tree”, Perrin Davidson, Freeport High School, Grade 11
“Dance”, Victoria Holmes, Houlton High School, Grade 11
“Harley”, Abby Fore, Houlton High School, Grade 12
“Ocean Breeze”, Taylor Fitzpatrick, Houlton Middle School, Grade 6
“Ereri”, Ciara Huggins, Lake Region Middle School, Grade 7
“Owl Maraca”, Jillian Whitney, Lake Region Middle School, Grade 7
“Stormy Seas”, Michael Smith, United Technology Center, Grade 12

Over the last six years, the MLTI device has featured screen savers featuring outstanding student works of art (twenty each year). To date, there have been well over two thousand pieces of artwork submitted. With the variety of devices available at MLTI, images are now made available as a download for either a screensaver or background image on every MLTI device.

More information is available by CLICKING HERE.

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MAEA Spring Conference

February 23, 2013

Maine Art Education Association, Saturday, April 6, Lord Hall, UMaine campus

Registration is now available at https://sites.google.com/site/maeaspringconference/
or you can get to registration through the MAEA website at
http://www.mainearted.org/MAEA/2013_Spring_Conference.html

Registration deadline: Monday, March 25, .8CEUs available for full participation in conference

MAEAspring13

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