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Top 10 Reasons to Support the Arts

February 25, 2017

Americans for the Arts research and resources

Each year Americans for the Arts puts together the top 10 reasons to support the arts. It is published on the AFTA site which you can download by CLICKING HERE.

Randy Cohen, VP of Research and Policy, Americans for the Arts creates the list based on a survey collecting information from people across this country.

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-3-12-41-pmThe arts are fundamental to our humanity. They ennoble and inspire us—fostering creativity, goodness, and beauty. The arts bring us joy, help us express our values, and build bridges between cultures. The arts also are a fundamental component of healthy communities, strengthening them socially, educationally, and economically—benefits that persist even in difficult social and economic times.

 

  1. Arts improve individual well-being. 63 percent of the population believe the arts “lift me up beyond everyday experiences,” 64 percent feel the arts give them “pure pleasure to experience and participate in,” and 73 percent say the arts are a “positive experience in a troubled world.”
  2. Arts unify communities. 67 percent of Americans believe “the arts unify our communities regardless of age, race, and ethnicity” and 62 percent agree that the arts “help me understand other cultures better”—a perspective observed across all demographic and economic categories.
  3. Arts improve academic performance. Students engaged in arts learning have higher GPAs and standardized test scores, and lower drop-out rates. The Department of Education reports that access to arts education for students of color is significantly lower than for their white peers, and has declined for three decades. Yet, research shows that low socio-economic-status students have even greater increases in academic performance, college-going rates, college grades, and holding jobs with a future. 88 percent of Americans believe that arts are part of a well-rounded K-12 education.
  4. Arts strengthen the economy. The arts and culture sector is a $730 billion industry, which represents 4.2 percent of the nation’s GDP—a larger share of the economy than transportation, tourism, and agriculture (U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis). The nonprofit arts industry alone generates $135 billion in economic activity annually (spending by organizations and their audiences), which supports 4.1 million jobs and generates $22.3 billion in government revenue.
  5. Arts are good for local businesses. Attendees at nonprofit arts events spend $24.60 per person, per event, beyond the cost of admission on items such as meals, parking, and babysitters—valuable revenue for local commerce and the community. Attendees who live outside the county in which the arts event takes place spend twice as much as their local counterparts ($39.96 vs. $17.42).
  6. Arts drive tourism. Arts travelers are ideal tourists, staying longer and spending more to seek out authentic cultural experiences. Arts destinations grow the economy by attracting foreign visitor spending. The U.S. Department of Commerce reports that, between 2003-2015, the percentage of international travelers including “art gallery and museum visits” on their trip grew from 17 to 29 percent, and the share attending “concerts, plays, and musicals” increased from 13 to 16 percent.
  7. Arts are an export industry. The arts and culture industries had a $30 billion international trade surplus in 2014, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. U.S. exports of arts goods (e.g., movies, paintings, jewelry) exceeded $60 billion.
  8. Arts spark creativity and innovation. Creativity is among the top 5 applied skills sought by business leaders—with 72 percent saying creativity is of high importance when hiring. The Conference Board’s Ready to Innovate report concludes, “The arts—music, creative writing, drawing, dance—provide skills sought by employers of the 3rd millennium.” Research on creativity shows that Nobel laureates in the sciences are 17 times more likely to be actively engaged in the arts than other scientists.
  9. Arts improve healthcare. Nearly one-half of the nation’s healthcare institutions provide arts programming for patients, families, and even staff. 78 percent deliver these programs because of their healing benefits to patients—shorter hospital stays, better pain management, and less medication.
  10. Arts and healing in the military. The arts are part of the military continuum—promoting readiness during pre-deployment as well as aiding in the successful reintegration and adjustment of Veterans and military families into community life. Service members and Veterans rank art therapies in the top 4 (out of 40) interventions and treatments.
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Doodle 4 Google – Maine Winner

February 24, 2017

Medomak Valley Middle School, Waldoboro

A student at Medomak Middle School in Waldoboro has been chosen as the winner of the state’s Doodle 4 Google competition. Ruth Havener, a seventh-grader, is one of 53 state and territory winners whose doodles now have a chance to appear on Google’s homepage in March.

CONGRATULATIONS RUTH!

Medomak Middle School seventh-grader Ruth Havener won the Doodle 4 Google statewide competition with “The Same Ocean in the Future.”

Medomak Middle School seventh-grader Ruth Havener won the Doodle 4 Google statewide competition with “The Same Ocean in the Future.”

The Doodle 4 Google competition is an annual nationwide contest open to students in grades K-12. Students create their own doodle, which must spell the word Google, from any materials they want. The theme of this year’s competition was “What I see for the future.”

According to a press release Havener’s doodle, titled “The Same Ocean in the Future,” depicts a colorful array of  sea creatures. It was selected out of thousands of entries received this year.

An assembly to announce Havener as the state winner will take place at Medomak Middle School on Monday, Feb. 27.
U.S. Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, will offer his congratulations to the winning student via video during the assembly.

From Thursday, Feb. 23 through Monday, March 6, anyone can vote for their favorite doodle from the 53 state and territory winners at google.com/doodle4google/vote.html.

The public voting will determine the five national finalists, who will be announced March 31. The finalists will be named from each of the competition’s age groups: grades K-3, grades four and five, grades six and seven, grades eight and nine, and grades 10-12. The national winner will be announced the same day and the winner’s doodle will go live on Google.

The winner will take home a $30,000 college scholarship and his or her school will receive a $50,000 Google for Education grant toward the establishment and improvement of a computer lab or technology program.

Google started the contest in 2008. Last year’s winner was Akilah Johnson, a 10th-grader from Washington, D.C.

This article was written by Alexander Violo and reprinted from the Lincoln County News, February 23rd edition.

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Teacher Greets Students

February 23, 2017

Special handshake

screen-shot-2017-02-02-at-10-22-31-amGrade 5 teacher, Barry White in Charlotte, NC says that he’s all about bringing joy to others lives. He recognizes that school is a “sanctuary” for some students. He knows that the “relationship” is the key to student success. Each student has created a special handshake that he or she does when they enter Barry’s classroom. Mr. White said he got the idea from watching Lebron James doing handshakes with his inner-circle.

Read the entire article and view the video posted NBC by CLICKING HERE.

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Another Kind of Blue

February 22, 2017

Britain’s got talent

Dance? Media arts? Theatre? Amazing….

 

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Without Borders

February 21, 2017

Intermedia MFA Program

Silkscreen created by Georgina Grenier

Silkscreen created by Georgina Grenier

Recently, I learned more about the Intermedia MFA program at UMaine, Orono. Dr. Owen Smith is the program director. The philosophy of the program is that one should avoid the well-known paths of art production and invent new ones, or combine old ones to find new, untraveled ways to work. This may mean using new technologies with no element of hand-making at all, but not necessarily so. This program has profoundly changed my ideas about art education, the role of art and the purpose of artists in general. Some students work with sound, light, electronics, biology, socially engaged art, science and art integration, data imaging and more. It is still a fledgling program but has so much potential.

I received an email asking me to participate in her culminating artwork for her program. Information below explains a bit of her project and includes a request from those of you interested and with time to make it happen.

has extended the request to each of you to participate.

Borders that separate art disciplines can sometimes fence us in, and lead us to produce work that may add little to our knowledge, even if we love to paint one more watercolor, make one more clay pot, or sing a much loved song one more time. “Without Borders”  is the culminating exhibit for this year’s graduates from the Intermedia MFA program at the University of Maine, Orono. It is work that fuses disciplines, or even creates new ones without borders. This exhibit and the program it represents are an open secret at Orono, an emerging program that will feature some of the most intriguing artwork in Maine, and I am humbled to be part of it this year. Watch for the final date, yet to be decided in May.

I am asking for help in a collaborative art project which will be a part of  “Without Borders”  in May. I am collecting anecdotes and insights about truth-telling, or lie-propagating, depending how you see it: We have all been lied to, told a lie ( even a little one!) and perhaps been hurt by indifference. We have also had joyful occasions when we heard the news we wanted, or told someone we truly love them.
I would be very grateful if you could  send me a few lines, more if you have a longer tale to tell, about how much truth-telling matters to you, and experiences you have had with the business of honesty. These will be included in a set of fifty handmade books. The first fifty respondents will have one of the books sent to them so that all the collected anecdotes and wisdom can be shared. All information will remain anonymous, and author’s names will NOT be revealed.

My hope is to receive your (truthful) responses by early March. Please e-mail them to Georgina Grenier, gecgrenier@myfairpoint.net

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Notes From Away

February 20, 2017

Boyd Place – Bangor

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-8-37-20-pm

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Young Audience Arts for Learning

February 19, 2017

April 9–April 22, 2017

Washington DC; USA: The Capitol Building, legislative branch of the US government Photo copyright Lee Foster Photo # 3-washdc83009

Washington DC; USA: The Capitol Building, legislative branch of the US government
Photo copyright Lee Foster Photo # 3-washdc83009

Young Audiences Arts for Learning will Host more than 150 Events and Programs across the US in Celebration of National Young Audiences Arts for Learning Week, April 9–April 22, 2017

New York, NY – February 14, 2017 – Young Audiences Arts for Learning (YA) is proud to announce the National Young Audiences Arts for Learning Week (YA Week), an annual advocacy and awareness campaign. The Young Audiences Arts for Learning network celebrates National YA Week to raise national and local awareness about arts-in-education initiatives in school and community venues through public programming, special events, and long-term residencies. It will be observed around the country by the entire network of 30 Young Audiences affiliates in 22 states. More information about upcoming affiliate YA Week events will be available at http://www.youngaudiences.org.

The YA network is the largest and oldest arts-in-education network in the country reaching more than 5 million students each year. A core value of Young Audiences is to provide access to high quality arts-in-education programming to young people regardless of their zip code.

“The YA network is in a strategic position to advocate for all students by publicly advancing the value of using the arts to enhance academic achievement. YA Week focuses on showcasing and highlighting this deep and demonstrable impact of the arts on education,” states David A. Dik, YA’s National Executive Director.

Established in 1952, Young Audiences’ mission is to inspire young people and expand their learning through the arts. The YA national organization also addresses policy makers directly to emphasize the importance of arts integrated residency programs. In Washington D.C., Young Audiences’ STEM-to-STEAM advocacy campaign continues to gain momentum along with the bipartisan efforts such as the Congressional STEAM Caucus. Each YA affiliate will be releasing information about their events and festivities in the upcoming months. Please see the list below of the participating affiliates.

The Young Audiences Arts for Learning Network:

Alliance for the Arts, Woodruff Arts Center, Atlanta, Georgia
Arkansas Learning through the Arts
Arts Council of Kern/Arts for Learning, Bakersfield, California
Arts for Learning Connecticut
Arts for Learning Indiana
Arts for Learning Miami, Florida
Arts for Learning San Diego, California
Arts Partners, Wichita, Kansas
Big Thought, Dallas, Texas
Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education, Chicago, Illinois
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning, Cleveland, Ohio
Kansas City Young Audiences, Missouri
Springboard, St. Louis, Missouri
Think 360 Arts for Learning, Denver, Colorado
Young Audiences Arts for Learning Maryland
Young Audiences New Jersey & Eastern Pennsylvania
Young Audiences New York
Young Audiences of Abilene, Texas
Young Audiences of Houston
Young Audiences of Louisiana
Young Audiences of Massachusetts
Young Audiences of Northeast Texas
Young Audiences of Northern California
Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington
Young Audiences of Rochester, New York
Young Audiences of Santa Cruz County, Arizona
Young Audiences of Southeast Texas
Young Audiences of Southwest Florida
Young Audiences of Virginia
Young Audiences of Western New York

CONTACT:
Young Audiences Arts for Learning
Jarred Hoyt
T: 212-860-1563 X107, E: jarred@ya.org

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