h1

Another Arts Teacher’s Story: Charles Michaud

March 28, 2017

MALI Teacher Leaders Series

This is the fifth blog post of the Phase 6 Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) Teacher Leader stories. This series includes a set of questions so you can learn a little bit about the work each Maine visual or performing arts teacher or artist is doing.  CLICK HERE  for more information on MALI. CLICK HERE  for more information on the 81 Teacher Leaders plus 4 Teaching Artist Leaders.  CLICK HERE  for Arts education resources. CLICK HERE  for the MALI Resource Bank. Search in the “search archives” box on the bottom right side of this post for past teacher leader stories. There have been 75 posted to date. Thank you Charles for sharing your story!

Charles Michaud is the Pre-K – 12 music teacher at MSAD#33 in Frenchville and St. Agatha, MSAD#33 has a little less than 200 students and is located on the northern border of the state.  Charles teaches general music for grades Pre-K – 6, and offers band for students from grades 4 – 6.  This is his third year teaching at Wisdom Middle/High School and Dr. Levesque Elementary School.

What do you like best about being a music educator?

In my opinion, the best part of being a music educator are the moments when learners surprise themselves by playing or singing something impressive. They light up and gain a whole new confidence in themselves.

What do you believe are three keys to ANY successful visual and performing arts education?

  1. Accessibility: Learners need opportunities to access the arts. While this seems like common sense from an outsider’s perspective, we all know the challenges of fitting in the schedule.
  2. Customization: A program that adapts to the abilities of the students requires customizing lessons and materials to meet the learning styles and speeds of the learners. I think that the best way to draw students into the arts is to make the arts theirs.
  3. Appropriateness: Every arts program exists within the context of the community. Make sure the goals of the program not only provides access to the broader arts world, but also has deep roots in the musical culture of the area. Many programs try to adapt the local culture to fit their music, but I think a successful program draws the community in by drawing the local musical culture into the program.

How have you found assessment to be helpful to you in your classroom?

Assessment is a big cog in the learning machine. Assessment is communication about learning, and plays an essential role in my classroom.

What have been the benefits in becoming involved in the Maine Arts Leadership initiative?

MALI has given me access to a community of arts educators on the cutting edge of their disciplines. Our collaborations and conversations have pushed me to innovate as an arts educator, which has been all to the benefit of my students.

What are you most proud of in your career?

The strength of community in my band is what has made me the most proud in my short career.  In the end, I find that what keeps students coming back year after year is that band is their home away from home.

What gets in the way of being a better teacher or doing a better job as a teacher?

My biggest barrier to becoming a better teacher is a lack of time for developing all of the cool new lessons and methods that I would like to try. Imagine what a few solid weeks of straight lesson planning could do for a teacher!

What have you accomplished through hard work and determination that might otherwise appear at first glance to be due to “luck” or circumstances?

Increasing the numbers in the music program has been my challenge since year one. I have been very successful in this regard, but it could easily be attributed to the great students that we have in our district.

Look into your crystal ball: what advice would you give to teachers?

Work hard and be innovative, because proficiency based education can present some very unique opportunities for the arts.

If you were given a $500,000.00 to do with whatever you please, what would it be?

If my program received 500k, I would create a position that bridges the gap from arts in school and arts in the community. This would connect my students with authentic learning experiences, and give them a model context for their role in the local arts scene.

Imagine you are 94 years old. You’re looking back. Do you have any regrets?

I have a long road to travel before I hit 94, so I will almost inevitably regret something. For now, however, I am very content with the choices that I have made. Fingers crossed!

h1

Learning by Making and Doing

March 27, 2017

MLTI Student Conference

The MLTI Student Conference Committee is still in need of a few more proposals for the 14th Annual MLTI Student Conference, to be held on Thursday May 25, 2017 at UMaine.

This year’s emphasis is on music and sound, allowing the MLTI Student Conference to continue its focus on “Learning by Making and Doing.”

Attending participants will learn how they can use their MLTI devices to create in ways that make learning happen — and tell the stories of their accomplishments. With music and sound as a focus (focus, not a limit!), the MLTI Student Conference planning team would like to consider workshops around music, spoken word recording, coding, video production, art, writing and publishing your collection of short stories, or one of any other endless possibilities!

The MLTI Student Conference supports all MLTI Devices regardless of platform (HP or Apple). Each platform provides for a variety of environments that can be used for making and doing.

You can learn more about the Conference on our website at http://maine.gov/doe/mlti/student/studentconference/index.html

Submit a proposal online at http://maine.gov/doe/mlti/student/studentconference/proposals/index.html

For simplicity and management, sessions may be designed for just one or two of the MLTI platforms, but “platform agnostic” sessions are encouraged.

We are looking for both adult presenters as well as student/teacher team presentations!

Spread the word – if you know of someone doing fantastic work involving technology with making, doing, or storytelling please encourage them to submit a proposal!

If you have any questions please contact Juanita at juanita.dickson@maine.gov.

h1

ESSA

March 27, 2017

Opportunity to provide feedback

During the next few days you have the opportunity to provide feedback on Maine’s Every Student Succeeds Act Consolidated Plan that the Maine Department of Education has submitted to the US Department of Education. The deadline for public comment is March 30, your feedback should be submitted to ESSA.DOE@maine.gov.

You may be wondering why this is different than No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the legislation that ESSA is replacing. ESSA requires that states choose at least one measure of school quality or success besides math and English Language proficiency, graduation rates, and English language learning.  Measures or indicators of school quality are extremely important as they are the basis for school accountability systems, which drive district priorities around funding, program choices and course offerings.

If you’d like more information on the topic and/or to learn what other state proposals are including on the arts, read THIS ARTICLE from Education Week written by Jackie Zubrzycki on March 7 called States Introduce New Measure of Accountability: Arts Education. Additional information on ESSA is at the federal site https://www.ed.gov/essa.

Educators, parents, students, teaching artists, arts organizations, and members of the community who believe in arts education are welcome to provide feedback. Public comment is welcome by all. This is an opportunity for you to provide your opinion. The deadline for submitting feedback is Thursday, March 30 to ESSA.DOE@maine.gov.

h1

Summer Workshop

March 26, 2017

Science and Art

h1

Introducing Phil Edelman

March 25, 2017

UMaine Assistant Professor of Music Education

I am currently an assistant professor of music education at the University of Maine School of Performing arts where I started in the fall of 2016. My teaching responsibilities include courses in music education and conducting, and he directs the UMaine Concert Band. I have earned degrees from the University of Missouri – Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance (Ph.D.), Kansas State University (MM), and the University of New Hampshire (BME). Prior to my appointment at the University of Maine, I taught courses in music education methods, field experiences, and music technology as part of my doctoral fellowship at the University of Missouri – Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance.   While in Kansas City, I served as the conductor of the Roeland Park New Horizons Band – an ensemble dedicated to collaborative music making among adults over the age of 50.

For seven years prior to my doctoral study, I was a director of instrumental music in the Goddard, Kansas school district (a suburb of Wichita), teaching in all areas of the instrumental music program (band, orchestra, jazz band, marching band, and chamber music). My research areas include lifelong music learning, undergraduate music education preparation, conductor decision-making, and the music student teaching experience. I am a tuba player, and occasionally still get to play around Bangor, although most of the time that I am making music nowadays, I am conducting or playing piano.

Why did you want to move to Maine?

I had finished my doctoral work and this job seemed perfect for me. I haven’t regretted moving to Maine for a second. My husband is a veterinarian in the greater Bangor area, and we have been made to feel very welcome here. Between the incredible students, supportive colleagues, and welcoming community, what could be better?

What did you think of our snowy Maine winter?

It was great for the first few inches. After that, it seemed like Mother Nature was just showing off.

Describe your responsibilities as Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Maine School of Performing Arts.

I have the best job in the world! I get to teach future teachers, and I get to direct the University of Maine Concert Band. We have about 100 students in the band this year and they are playing wonderfully!

What are your professional goals and what do you hope to achieve in your position?

I’d like to learn much more about how we as college educators can better prepare our students for the “real world.” This is one of the foci of my research. Further, I am working on a recorder program with a colleague in the clinical psychology department examining the effect of recorder group lessons on the cognitive abilities of older adults. Once we have a feasibility study completed (this summer, we hope!), we hope to expand our program beyond the Bangor area and offer recorder group programs in many senior adult living communities. Finally, I’d like to see us break down the hidden walls between public school music educators and collegiate music educators. We are all on the same team, and have much to learn from each other.

If you were given $500,000 to do whatever you please, what would it be?

I would buy the biggest snow-blower that money could buy so I could always be comfortable in Maine! AND… I would love to provide instruments to schools who are currently dealing with budget cuts due to administrative or political challenges.

 

h1

Maine State Poetry Out Loud

March 24, 2017

Hot off the screen – POL video

The Maine Arts Commission Marketing Director Ryan Leighton created this video that documents the recent state Poetry Out Loud event. It is so great to hear what the students have to say about what POL means to them. If you’d like to learn more about the program in Maine please CLICK HERE.

h1

Dance Grant Funds

March 23, 2017

Another great opportunity to dance

On a chilly Saturday in March I traveled south to the beautiful Noble High School for the Fifth Annual Benefit Performance for Dancers Making a Difference, “Dancing To Make A Difference 2017”  Benefit.

Dancers Making A Difference was formed to allow studios and their performers the opportunity to come together and share their passion and talent in a non-competitive environment while working for the good of a local non-profit whose mission they support. In the last 4 years Dancers Making A Difference have raised almost $15,000. Proceeds raised have gone toward helping the following organizations. End 68 Hours of Hunger, Camp Kita, Friends In Action, and youth in the Maine Foster Care system. Initiatives for Maine Foster Care included Josh’s College Care Packages, Rose Mary’s Sacks of LOVE, and H.O.M.E. (Having Opportunities Means Everything).

Dancers Making A Difference is an official 501c, and this year the proceeds from the performance in early March are designated to the Maine Arts Commission’s Dance Education Grant Fund. The money raised was a little more than $5,000 and will be combined with the $3,500 raised in November at a dance performance held at Thornton Academy by a combined group of dance studios and school dance programs.  The grant will be announced in the near future and is earmarked for PK-12 school programs where no dance education is available to students.  

Last year the students in St. Agatha, MSAD #33 benefited from the first funding awarded and had dance educator/teaching artist John Morris spend a week in December at their two schools meeting with every student in grades K-12. You can read about the residencies in three blog posts dated

A great big thank you to the board of Dancers Making a Difference for their commitment to providing dance opportunities to learners of all ages. Through their hard work and supportive families and community members they have raised $6730 that will go towards the dance education grant administered by the Maine Arts Commission. Watch future blog posts with information on how your school/district can apply. You can check out their facebook page “Dancers Making a Difference, or email them at DMAD122014@gmail.com for more information.

Nicolette Wilford, Barbra Childress, Argy Nestor, Tricia Bates, Cheryl Arnold – board members of Dancers Making a Difference

 

This is the Senior Repetory Company from Brixham Danceworks, host of the Dancers Making a Difference benefit performance. Pictured are (back) Grace Wirling, Kianna Lynch, Alyssa Saltz, choreographer Cheryl Arnold, Emma Dodier, Sammi Pooler, Mikayla King, Gracie Lodge-McIntyre (front) Hannah Sparks, Maggie Childress, Holly Proulx, Sarina Arnold, Leah Sobotka and Maddie Letellier (lying down)

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: