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Portland Museum of Art

September 30, 2016

Two opportunities

Polly Apfelbaum (United States, born 1955), Night Flowering, 2009, multicolor woodblock print on paper, 16 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Durham Press.

Polly Apfelbaum (United States, born 1955), Night Flowering, 2009, multicolor woodblock print on paper, 16 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Durham Press.

IN CONVERSATION: CONNECTING PAINTING AND PRINTMAKING
Saturday, October 1, 3 p.m.
Free for members, MECA students, and Skowhegan School of
Painting and Scultpure alumni, $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

Since 1964, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Scultpure has brought together diverse and talented groups of artists for concentrated periods of artistic creation, interaction, and growth. In the spirit of the discursive environment of Skowhegan’s rural Maine campus, artist Polly Apfelbaum (Skowhegan resident faculty, 1999) and art historian Faye Hirsch will engage in a conversation inspired by the PMA exhibition Skowhegan at Seventy. Join us in exploring how the printmaking process sparks a spirit of inquiry and experimentation in the studio, and delve into the intersection between printmaking and painting in contemporary practice.

Pre-registration strongly encouraged. Click here for tickets.

Henri Matisse, (France, 1869 - 1954), Icare (Icarus) 8 of 20 in "Jazz" (detail), 1947, stencil, lithograph, pochoir on arches, 16 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches. Ex2.2016.9. Bank of America Collection. 2016 Succession H. Matisse/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Henri Matisse, (France, 1869 – 1954), Icare (Icarus) 8 of 20 in “Jazz” (detail), 1947, stencil, lithograph, pochoir on arches, 16 1/2 x 25 1/2 inches. Ex2.2016.9. Bank of America Collection. 2016 Succession H. Matisse/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

BOOK ARTS: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Friday October 21, 4 p.m.
Free for members and MECA students; $8 general public
Bernard Osher Foundation Auditorium

The vast world of book arts spans from the medieval bookbinding and letterpress tradition to today’s installation art; limited edition, hand-made books; modern novel constructions. Join us to explore the history of book arts, the nuances of the realtionships between the visual and textual, and the various printing and writing processes.

Moderated by Yale’s Jae Jennifer Rossman and featuring panelists Susan Webster, Stuart Kestenbaum, and Rebecca Goodale.

Pre-registration encouraged. Click here for tickets.

 

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Deadline October 13

September 29, 2016

Teaching Artist roster – 2 weeks left to apply

Brian Evans-Jones, Teaching Artist

Brian Evans-Jones, Literary Teaching Artist – Why I teach

The Maine Arts Commission is now accepting applications for fall submissions to it PK-12 Teaching Artists Roster. The application deadline is Thursday, October 13 at 5 p.m. The roster, launched in 2014 and available at https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Teaching-Artist-Roster, includes Maine artists whose applications reflect their expertise and commitment to providing learning opportunities for students and/or teachers in PK-12 educational settings. There are currently 56 artists on the roster in disciplines including dance, literary arts, media arts, music, theater, and visual arts. Applications are accepted only two times per year.

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Nancy Salmon Dance Teaching Artist – Why I teach

The Arts Commission defines Teaching Artists as professional artists who are dedicated to lifelong learning and arts education, have made it an integral part of their professional practice, and who have cultivated skills as educators in concert with their skills as artists.

Successful applicants demonstrate mastery of an artistic discipline; knowledge and expertise in sequential arts instruction; good communication skills; planning and organizational ability; and an understanding of PK-12 learners.

To learn more about the Maine Arts Commission teaching artist program and to access the application please go to https://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Teaching-Artists#.

To learn more about the Arts Commission’s other PK-12 arts education programs contact Argy Nestor at argy.nestor@maine.gov or 207-287-2713.

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MICA Conference

September 28, 2016

Registration still open

screen-shot-2016-09-28-at-9-08-12-amLooking for some creative inspiration? How about learning about how we can create cultural equity for all Mainers, or leading from a place of making? These are just two samples of the many inspiring keynotes and sessions you’ll get at the Maine Arts Commission Maine International Conference on the Arts (MICA) October 6-7 in Lewiston/Auburn. Poet and advocate Crystal Williams will speak on “Practical Approaches to Creating Impact: Getting to Cultural Equity” Thursday night at 5:30 p.m., and Friday lunch keynote is “Stop Asking for Permission! Leading from a Place of Making (Things Happen)” by Sherry Wagner-Henry. Advance Registration closes September 30: go to mainearts.com/MICA to learn more and to register today!

MAINE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE ARTS (MICA)

Following the arts education conference on Thursday afternoon, October 6, the MICA officially opens at 4:00 pm with a reception at 4:30 pm, Franco Center, Lewiston. Following the reception Pam Breaux, CEO of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) will provide a brief “State of the States”. Crystal Williams will be the opening keynote at 5:30 pm. Poet, essayist, and Bates College VP and Chief Diversity Officer Crystal’s keynote. Following the keynote in downtown Lewiston: cultural offerings including Downtown Lewiston Gallery Crawl, showcases at The Community Little Theater in Auburn, Franco-Fest at Bates College, Poetry Reading at the Lewiston Library, and more.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7

MICA opens on Friday morning with an Idea Lab – 5 artists presenting in a Pecha Kucha format. Included in the Idea Lab is Nancy Frolich who established an arts and literacy with a program she created called LEAPS of Imagination. During the day participants have choices between 20 sessions – 5 different strands with 4 sessions under each of these topics: Leveraging Investment, Visibility of the Arts & Culture Sector, Arts Education, Cultural Tourism, and Building Capacity. A general schedule is located at THIS LINK. A pdf and more schedule info is located at THIS LINK.

I hope to see you in Lewiston! If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email me at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

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Arts Ed Conference

September 27, 2016

Hulteen comes to Maine

Cheryl Hulteen presents:

“Teaching Artful Practice/Practice Artful Teaching”

Thursday, 6 October 2016, 11:30am – 4:00pm

Franco American Heritage Center

46 Cedar St, Lewiston, ME

4 contact hours provided

$40 includes lunch (no cost for full time students)

Registration located at http://mica.bpt.me/

Screen Shot 2016-08-30 at 9.03.10 AMDESCRIPTION of CHERYL’S SESSION
Arts teaching professionals have much to share in their partnership to create personal artful pathways for students to express and explore creative voice through the arts. Using the Multiple Intelligences Theory, join us in a collaboration defining, exploring, celebrating and understanding different practices of artful teaching. We will build a learning community that reflects the role the arts play in everything we do, teach and learn by strengthening the creative exchanges of artful process and practice-defining, exploring, celebrating and understanding different practices of artful teaching. We will build a learning community that reflects the role the arts play in everything we do, teach and learn by strengthening the creative exchanges of artful process and practice.

FOR REGISTRATION CLICK HERE

PRESENTER

Screen Shot 2016-08-30 at 9.03.58 AMAuthor of “YES YES GOOD, The HeART of Teaching”, Master Teaching Artist Cheryl Hulteen has spent over 20 years providing consulting services for school districts, teachers, administrators, parents and students to foster greater learning and insight through building Creative Classroom Cultures. “YES YES GOOD” works with stakeholders across the educational landscape to build exciting, innovative and positive environments for teaching, learning, and arts integrated curriculum development through motivational workshops, professional development and one-on-one coaching. In addition to founding YES YES GOOD, Cheryl also serves as teaching faculty for Connecticut Higher Order Thinking Schools, an initiative of the Connecticut Office of the Arts, managed in partnership with Wesleyan University’s Green Street Arts Center.  “However we may speak, it is through the voices of our children we will most clearly be heard.”

MICA

Following the Arts Ed conference is the Maine International Conference on the Arts. Thursday night and all day Friday. ARTS EDUCATION TRACK for FRIDAY MICA plus other great sessions being offered at the Lewiston Bates Mill.

FOR REGISTRATION CLICK HERE

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MacArthur Fellow

September 26, 2016

Anne Basting – TimeSlips

The Maine Arts Commission has offered training in TimeSlips as part of the Creative Aging program. Anne Basting, theater artist and educator created the program and has recently been named a MacArthur Fellow!

Anne Basting, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, Milwaukee/Wisconsin, 9-6-2016.

Anne Basting, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Anne Basting is a theater artist and educator demonstrating the potential of storytelling and creative expression to improve the lives of elders experiencing cognitive impairment. Across a variety of formats and platforms—theater, memoir, narrative, collaborative public performance, and academic research—Basting has developed an alternative concept of aging, one that focuses on its possibilities as well as its challenges and views sustained emotional connections as critical to our well-being as we age.

Her breakthrough project, TimeSlips, is an improvisational storytelling method in which older adults with cognitive impairment imagine stories and poems in response to inspiring cues. Basting used a collection of poems by the residents of Luther Manor Home in Wisconsin to create and stage a theater piece with the residents in 2000. She then refined and transformed TimeSlips into a formal therapy protocol guided by her fundamental insight that the creation of new stories can be an enriching substitute for lost memories. Basting has since created several theater pieces with elder collaborators around specific themes or community issues. The most ambitious of these, The Penelope Project (2010), grew out of a series of writing, visual arts, and music and movement exercises that imagines the life of Penelope as she awaits the return of Odysseus in Homer’s tale. Other projects, such as Islands of Milwaukee (2012) and The Crossings (2014), have encouraged community engagement, promoted intergenerational interactions, and raised awareness around elder safety.

Basting’s perspective on aging and the power of stories is changing the perceptions of caregivers, family members, and policy makers around the artistic and creative capabilities of older adults, regardless of age or cognitive status. Her nonprofit, TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, offers online and in-person training programs and has helped long-term care facilities and caregivers around the world implement TimeSlips. Through performances and scholarship about the development and efficacy of her approach and theater projects, Basting is widening the reach of her artistic advocacy and ensuring that all citizens age with vital human connection.

Anne Basting received a B.A. from Colorado College (1987), an M.A. (1990) from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. (1995) from the University of Minnesota. She is currently a professor of theater in the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee (UWM), founder (in 1998) and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, and founder and coordinator of Creative Trust Milwaukee. She is the author of Forget Memory: Creating Better Lives for People with Dementia (2009), The Stages of Age: Performing Age in Contemporary American Culture (1998), and The Penelope Project: An Arts-Based Odyssey to Change Elder Care (2016) in addition to numerous articles, plays, and public performances.

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MMEA Conference

September 25, 2016

September 30

The Maine Chapter (American Orff- Schulwerk Association) with MMEA (Maine Music Educators Association) are proud to present:

Jonathan Rappaport & Charlyn Bethel

 Flavors of Kodály and Weikart:

Surefire songs, dances, games, and part songs

Sessions to include:

Introduction to the Kodály Concept

A Baker’s Dozen–13 Ways to Teach a New Song

The Sequential Development of Part Work

Teaching Movement and Dance Using Education Through Movement

Friday, September 30, 2016, 9 AM – 3:30 PM at Le Club Calumet – Augusta, ME (334 West River Road Augusta). Credit: 1.5 CEUs from the University of Southern Maine with a paper and lesson plan ($12. charge must be sent to USM at a later date – info at workshop).

For a registration form or more information please contact Nancy Cash-Cobb mainemmeagmpk5vp@gmail.com or call her at 446-1762, Windham Primary Sch00l.

Learn about this internationally-renowned approach to teaching students of all ages in a child-developmental approach of learning music through the human voice, movement, sight-reading, and comprehensive musical understanding. The process of learning is key, with careful preparation, presentation, and practice of all elements, concepts and skills. Covered will be choice of musical materials, sequencing, tools of Kodály teaching (hand signs, solfa, rhythm syllables, letter names), and learning a variety of classroom tested, successful song material.

A Baker’s Dozen–13 Ways to Teach a New Song

presented by Jonathan

Successful learning of a wide variety of song material is critical for the success of the general music classroom at all grade levels. Learn 13 ways of teaching songs that intrigue students, keep them focused, and offer variety to the routines of teaching songs. Songs presented will be time-tested, successful songs useful in a variety of elementary grades.

The Sequential Development of Part Work

presented by Jonathan

Developing part-singing skills takes time and careful sequencing for children to gain confidence, ability, and proficiency. This workshop examines part-work development in a successful sequence of learning. It will include a variety of part music suitable for young voices, including rounds, canons, partner songs, part songs, and folk song arrangements.

Teaching Movement and Dance Using Education Through Movement

presented by Charlyn

This session will outline how to build a movement foundation for your students. Education Through Movement is a process that has analyzed locomotor and non-locomotor movements, which helps the teacher start with what is easiest and progress into more challenging movement sequences that are used in simple folk dances. Topics will include ways of engaging learners to move creatively, the prerequisites to teaching dance, and then practical application to some actual folk dances. Wear comfortable shoes and expect to have some fun!

Jonathan C. Rappaport is Executive Director of Arts|Learning (Medfield, MA), a statewide non-profit organization that advocates for and promotes arts education and systemic education reform, and the Co-Founder/Director emeritus of the Kodály Music Institute, Southborough, MA, (founded 1998) where he teaches conducting and advanced pedagogy and materials analysis.  He was formerly Head of School, Conservatory Lab Charter School (Brighton, MA), and the Performing Arts Liaison of the Worcester (MA) Public Schools.

Jonathan is a conductor, educator, composer, pianist, singer, author, and consultant for school systems.  He has served as the choral director of numerous schools, children’s festival honor choirs, churches, synagogues, and community choral groups. Rappaport has published 18 choral works and 5 books, and is the recipient of awards for his work advocating for the arts in public schools from the MA Music Educators, the MA Alliance for Arts Education, the New England Theatre Conference, and the MA Art Educators Association.  He has taught music, trained teachers nationally, presented at national and state conferences in over a dozen states, and directed choruses for 45 years.

Charlyn Bethell has been using Kodály Methodology in her Concord Public Schools K-5 classes for 28 years. She has been teaching at the Kodály Music Institute since its inception (1998) and presently teaches Pedagogy and Materials to Level II students in that program. She has given workshops for the Organization of American Kodály Educators, the MA Music Educators Assn, and the Boston Area Kodály Educators. Charlyn is the Music Director of her UU church in Watertown and she is a freelance oboist in the Boston area. She is the adjunct oboe teacher at Phillips Andover Academy and she plays regularly with Solar Winds Quintet and Kaleidoscope Chamber Ensemble. She has performed with Monadnock Music, the Rhode Island Philharmonic, Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra, Emmanuel Music, New Hampshire Symphony, and the Opera Company of Boston. She was a founding member of the New Art Winds (woodwind quintet), which made its New York debut in Carnegie Recital Hall in 1985. She has recorded for CRI.

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Farnsworth Art Museum

September 24, 2016

Fall Festival

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