Posts Tagged ‘Rob Westerberg’

h1

Those Amazing Presenters!

October 15, 2015

Different format provides info for all

The Biennial Statewide conference provided a unique format with 5X5 presentations – our version of Pecha Kucha. Each of the workshop session leaders presented for 5 minutes using 5-8 slides. These took place during the morning of the Measure of Success conference which gave participants a chance to hear and see and appetizer of 9 different topics.

On top of providing the workshops each of the presenters put together a plethora of resources and they are available to all of you! When you go there you will be totally blown away at the amazing resources they collected which are now living at http://www.maineartsassessment.com/#!measure-of-success-conference/chki. DON’T miss them.

During the afternoon of the conference presenters jumped into the 9 topics by providing hour and 15 minute sessions on the following:

  • Studio Habits of Mind: Using the “Hidden Curriculum” to Encourage Student Autonomy with Visual Arts Teachers Theresa Cerceo from Dr. Levesque Elementary, Wisdom Middle/High School and Janie Snider from Hancock Grammar School

IMG_0403

  • Making Maine and ME with Visual Arts Teacher Jennie Driscoll from Brunswick High School

IMG_0470

  • Evaluating Individual Proficiency within the Large Ensemble with Music Teacher Jen Etter from York Middle School
  • Dancing with the Creative Process: How to incorporate standards-based dance and movement activities in classroom learning and assessment with Dancer, Educator, and Teaching Artist John Morris

IMG_1757

  • In the Midst of Madness with Music Teacher Jen Nash from Sabasticook Valley Middle School, Dance Teacher MaryEllen Schaper from Bonny Eagle Middle School, and Associate Professor, Educational Leadership from USM Jeff Beaudry, Ph.D.

IMG_0432

  • Empathy, Kindness and Wonder, Arts Integration at Work with the Director and Founder of Sweet Tree Arts Lindsay Pinchbeck
  • Brains on Fire: How Research on the Brain Can Inform Arts Education with the Executive Director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education Catherine Ring
  • From Cool to Tool: Technology Integration with Student Learning in Mind with Music Teacher  Kate Smith from Central School in South Berwick, and Mt. Blue High School in Farmington Teacher Dan Ryder

IMG_0456

  • Proficiency Based Learning: An Advocacy Story Music Teacher Rob Westerberg from York High School 
    IMG_0462

A GREAT big thank you to each of the presenters for the 9 sessions. YOU were truly amazing!

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. MALI is a program of the Maine Arts Commission. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

h1

A Word About the Conference Presentations

September 10, 2015

Biennial statewide conference – October 9 – Early-bird registration deadline is today, September 10!

GO DIRECTLY TO REGISTRATION https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1726177

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WORKSHOPS http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide-Register

The photo below is from a zoom meeting where some of the workshop presenters for the October 9 statewide biennial arts education conference The Measure of Success were engaged in learning more about how to put together the best format for the morning sessions. We are calling the sessions 5 X 5.

What does that mean?

Nine workshops are being offered during the PM sessions. Each conference participant selects from two of them (they are repeated) to attend when they register. During the AM session each workshop presenter will have 5 minutes and 5-8 images to provide a glimpse of their afternoon session that is scheduled for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

What if you see/hear something in the AM that you must attend?

You can change your mind and attend a different session in the PM than you registered for before the conference.

Screen Shot 2015-07-17 at 2.07.33 PM

If they look serious it is because they were working to bring you the BEST learning opportunities possible!

THE TOPICS

  • Studio Habits of Mind: Using the “Hidden Curriculum” to Encourage Student Autonomy with Visual Arts Teachers Theresa Cerceo from Dr. Levesque Elementary, Wisdom Middle/High School and Janie Snider from Hancock Grammar School
  • Making Maine and ME with Visual Arts Teacher Jennie Driscoll from Brunswick High School
  • Evaluating Individual Proficiency within the Large Ensemble with Music Teacher Jen Etter from York Middle School
  • Dancing with the Creative Process: How to incorporate standards-based dance and movement activities in classroom learning and assessment with Dancer, Educator, and Teaching Artist John Morris
  • In the Midst of Madness with Music Teacher Jen Nash from Sabasticook Valley Middle School, Dance Teacher MaryEllen Schaper from Bonny Eagle Middle School, and Associate Professor, Educational Leadership from USM Jeff Beaudry, Ph.D.
  • Empathy, Kindness and Wonder, Arts Integration at Work with the Director and Founder of Sweet Tree Arts Lindsay Pinchbeck
  • Brains on Fire: How Research on the Brain Can Inform Arts Education with the Executive Director of the New England Institute for Teacher Education Catherine Ring
  • From Cool to Tool: Technology Integration with Student Learning in Mind with Music Teacher  Kate Smith from Central School in South Berwick, Mountain Valley High School in Rumford Teacher Jeff Bailey, and Mt. Blue High School in Farmington Teacher Dan Ryder
  • Proficiency Based Learning: An Advocacy Story Music Teacher Rob Westerberg from York High School 

    Want to learn more about the sessions? 
    If you wish to reach a description of each workshop, see photos of the presenters, WATCH A ONE MINUTE VIDEO on each session, please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/Biennial-Statewide-Workshop-Descriptions#.

    What else are these workshop presenters providing?

    An amazing collection of resources that will go live on the day of the conference, October 9. You will be blown away by what they’ve put together for conference attendees. You won’t want to miss it just for the resources alone!

    Deadline for the Early-bird registration of $90 is today, September 9!

    The conference is sponsored by the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI), a program of the Maine Arts Commission. To learn more please go to http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI#

    Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email Argy Nestor if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

h1

Rob’s Talking

September 2, 2015

When a former student speaks, listen up

Thank you to Rob Westerberg, music educator from York High School and co-founder of the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (formerly known as the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative), who provided the following blog post.

Katrina Faulstich is a former student teacher of mine and choral director at Bedford High School in Massachusetts. She has been doing some course work for her Masters degree down in Connecticut this Summer. As part of that work she submitted a paper for her Measurement and Evaluation class called, “The Use of Recordings to Assess Individuals in High School Chorus”. If you are not a high school choral director, don’t stop reading – this is one of the most informing pieces of writing I’ve come across in awhile. There are takeaways that translate to every music educator regardless of age group or specialty. To be sure, Katrina lays out her plans for assessing individuals in her program. And they are really cool. But there is so much more going on here and it’s a game changer when you look at it through a finer lens. She concludes her opening paragraph with the statement, “With so many changes affecting education, teachers must remember to do what is best for student learning and achievement.” Ya think? My takeaways from her paper:

  • We always cry foul when colleagues and administrators marginalize academic music programs, but research shows that they have every right to. J. A. Russell and J. R. Austin (2010): “researchers examining assessment practice in secondary music classrooms found that attendance and attitude were the most common grading criteria employed by instrumental and choral music teachers” (“Music Assessment Research,” para. 3). If this statement were true for any other teacher in any other core subject area, they would be fired. And you know it. We’ve been doing it however – and getting away with it – for generations. The research found that music teachers on average based 60% of grade weight on non-achievement criteria. When MAAI (MALI) ran its first state conference in 2011, the debate we had on the Leadership Team was whether or not to include the word “assessment” in it, the argument being that if we did it would scare arts teachers away. In retrospect, I don’t know which is scarier: that we were actually fearful about including the word or that we had reason to be.
  • We are too often guilty of assessing the skills of an entire ensemble over those of the individuals within. L.H. Tracy (2002): Two hundred and seventy four high school choral teachers completed a survey. (It was found that) teachers seemed to use personal philosophy to decide whether or not to assess individuals. In accordance with previous studies, Tracy found most teachers assess students on attendance, attitude, and effort. Tracey attributed this to the “‘teach as we are taught’ phenomenon” (p. 154). Most participants reported using in-class observations as a form of assessment, but Tracy stated this does not mean teachers know what individuals know and are able to do (Colwell, 1991, as cited in Tracy, 2002). Personal assessment “philosophy” has no place in 21st century classrooms. We know from a national standpoint as well as from an international standpoint that assessment of individual student growth is now a foundational expectation of every classroom teacher, period. We can get caught up too easily in state and federal mandates that carry this to an extreme with the “how oftens” and the “let’s standardize all this” filtering out the real issue here. There are effective ways of assessing that enhance and articulate student learning, and there are ways that don’t. That debate isn’t being held here. But to avoid individual assessment because of those and/or other filters that we allow to impact our choices? Inexcusable.
  • Tracy indicated many chorus teachers lack training in assessment and therefore do not use the best assessment practices. This was the foundational reason we formed MAAI 5 years ago. To date, we have provided professional development to over 1,200 arts educators here in Maine, provided by peers in the trenches fighting the same battles as everyone else. Though it is entrenched in research, all of it is foundational and practical so teachers can individualize their work based on their setting and available resources. Maine’s arts educators are running out of excuses on this one.
  • Individual assessment facilitates growth. Katrina alluded to a study in which students who were assessed on sight reading skills for instance showed significant improvement over those who were not assessed. We cannot look at assessment as something that “gets in the way of what I’m trying to do” any longer. Conceptually, curriculum, assessment and instruction must be an integrated entity. When we divide these elements like slices of pie we miss out on the real power of each. Our students benefit when we transparently link them in a thoughtful, sequential and systematic way. Research supports this for every other core subject area, and it supports it for the arts as well.
  • Many teachers justified the lack of individual performance assessments by claiming teachers do not have time to assess each student during class time. Kotora suggested researchers look into teachers’ use of computer, audio, and video technology to assess individual students in chorus. I literally refer to my career as the years I taught before attending the Hartford, Connecticut MENC Eastern Division Conference in February 2007, and the years I’ve taught since. That was when I discovered Smartmusic. I’m not a Smartmusic shill, and I don’t believe it’s the best technology for every situation. Far from it. But through Smartusic I found a way to assess every individual in my chorus. At the time I had 230 singers in a school of 650 with NO way to individually assess them. Technology changed that, and transformed my courses, my curriculum, my instruction and, most importantly, my students learning. Mind you, that was eight and a half years ago. The vast landscape of technology at our fingertips now offers astounding opportunities for individual assessment in the large group setting.
  • We need to listen to our newer colleagues to the profession. Katrina is a great example of this. She prefaces her paper with the statement that she already utilizes individual assessment in her classroom, but she’s not satisfied with her strategies. She already does it but isn’t satisfied! How many times have we as veteran teachers filtered out valuable growth opportunities with a wee small voice on the inside of us that says as a rebuttal, “but I’ve always done it my way and it works?” To satirize the meme that is often used in social media these days, “But I’ve always done it my way and it works”, said no beginning teacher ever. Katrina and her classmate Kaitlin Young, Drew and Ashley Albert, Jen Etter, Jen Nash, Jake Sturdevant. I wrote my own blog post a couple of years ago on this topic (http://goobermusicteachers.com/2013/03/02/nothing-to-learn-from-beginning-teachers/) and feel even stronger about it today than when I wrote it. Inexperience = searching. And perhaps that’s something we can all give them more credit for.

There’s much more in Katrina’s paper and it’s worth the read. Working with data and educational studies can be very dry. But from that work can be mined some essential truths. “Assessment based on curricular objectives is important if music education is to be perceived as a legitimate subject” (Shuler, 1990, as cited in Kotora, 2005, p. 73). Choosing to ignore research, best practices, new ideas and new strategies for music instruction is an option. It is. But doing so will inevitably lead to the demise of our programs and of our profession, and research supports this. The 2015-2016 school year is a perfect opportunity for each of us to move our assessment work forward in whatever capacity is available to us in our own schools. Not the state, not the DOE, not NAfME, not your administrators, not MALI, but your STUDENTS will be the beneficiaries. And that’s why we’re here to begin with, isn’t it?

Fortunately for us Katrina’s paper is available on the Maine Arts Assessment Resources website at http://media.wix.com/ugd/4747f3_fd6b4c29ecbd434cb73884fa7b3be72a.pdf.

h1

MALI Leadership Team

August 14, 2015

Those amazing leadership team members

Sooooo…. hours of meetings, zoom sessions for brainstorming, tons of time planning, phone calls for tweaking, emails of questions, google docs of compiling, scheduling and keeping lists. The dedication that the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative (MALI) leadership team has devoted to planning and implementing the summer institute has been unbelievable. I am humbled by their work and grateful for their enthusiasm and commitment.

Three of the team members have been around since January 2011 when we had the first planning meeting of the initiative’s leadership team. Periodically I reflect on where MALI is and think about how none of this would be possible without the time that the leadership team has devoted. They are funny, creative, problem-solvers with a “never give up” attitude. They are by far top notch professionals who continuously make me a better person! I am sooooo thankful and Maine arts education is fortunate! Each of the following attended zoom meetings almost weekly since January!

  • Catherine Ring – Executive Director, New England Institute for Teacher Education
  • Rob Westerberg – Music Educator, York High School
  • Jeff Beaudry – Associate Professor, Educational Leadership, USM
  • Pam Kinsey – Music Educator, Easton Schools
  • Barb Vinal – Instructional Technology Facilitator, Raleigh, NC and former Maine Music Educator

In addition Nancy Salmon planned the Teaching Artist segment of the institute which received rave reviews! Thank you Nancy!

Since the Teach to Lead Summit in Washington, D.C. July 22-24, two teacher leaders have stepped up and worked with the Leadership Team with the planning of the institute. Without them the 3 days would have been very different.  I want to thank the following for the work each of them have contributed intensely after returning home from the Teach to Lead Summit.

  • Theresa Cerceo – Visual Art Educator, Dr. Levesque Elementary School, Wisdom Middle/High School, MSAD 33, K-12
  • Kate Smith – Music Educator, Central Elementary School, PK-3
Theresa and Kate in D.C.

Theresa and Kate in D.C.

Please note: On August 3, 2015, MAAI, the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative, announced its new name, MALI, the Maine Arts Leadership Initiative. You can read about it at https://meartsed.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/maai-goes-to-mali/. Please email me know if you have any questions at argy.nestor@maine.gov.

h1

MAAI Teacher Leaders – Hats off!

July 15, 2015

Don’t be shy, consider the opportunity

photoAs many of you know the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative (MAAI) has just started phase 5. When the idea was launched after an energizing trip to NH in August of 2010, Rob Westerberg, Catherine Ring and I never dreamed of what would be in store 5 years down the road.

Recently, I had the opportunity to take a different look at MAAI and realize just how much more MAAI has been then “just an assessment initiative”. Five years ago “assessment in arts education” was almost a dirty phrase in Maine. (I am not naive, I know that there are still people out there who don’t understand why we would suggest assessment for and in the arts.)

However, the initiative has become so much more and different than that. Yes, it is about assessment and in addition, it is about leadership, technology, creativity, curriculum, teaching, and learning. It is about educator effectiveness, proficiency-based education, student-centered learning, integration.  And, it is about community, networking, questioning, pushing back, learning from each other, taking chances, finding ones voice and a place at the table, communicating, being brave, respect, individual differences, honesty, and honoring what teachers know.

I am proud to know those who have stepped up to represent Maine arts educators as Teacher Leaders. I am so impressed with the work each one of you have done. The total number is 75 Teacher Leaders, I  am amazed that you continue to expand on your thinking. You are truly life-long learners. The more that you learn, the more you seem to want to share. We all benefit from the great work that you are doing! My hat is off to you, MAAI Teacher Leaders!

If you’ve been thinking about applying to be a Teacher Leader I hope that you will continue to consider it – you have about 11 months to decide because you will most likely have a chance in 2016 to apply to be a Teacher Leader for phase 6 of the initiative.

(Yes, Teacher Leaders, the hats are in and the t-shirts are on the way!)

h1

Megas UMaine USM

April 6, 2015

MAAI Mega-regional workshops – last of the school year

Last Thursday and Friday the last two Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s (MAAI) Mega-regional workshops were held at UMaine, Orono and USM, Portland campus. Both were a success and the 127 teachers who participated had positive feedback. It was an opportunity designed just for visual and performing arts educators including teaching artists.

I am so proud of the Teacher Leaders and the workshops they created. MAAI believes that “teachers teaching teachers” is very powerful!

Thank you to the following Teacher Leaders listed below who provided the following workshops:

UMaine, Orono – Thursday, April 2

  • Finding the Hidden Treasure in Art with Student Self Assessment, Jennie Driscoll Brunswick High School Visual Arts
  • Efficient and Effective Assessment in the Elementary Music Classroom, Frances Kellogg Ellsworth Elementary Middle School Music
  • Multiple Pathways: Helping Students Achieve Proficiency in ELA and Social Studies through Performing Arts Class!, Beth Lambert Carrabec High School Performing Arts
  • The Foolish Man Builds his House Upon the Sand: Laying a Firm Foundation for the Arts (and life) in Early Childhood, Judy Fricke Main Street Music Studios Music
  • My Choice-Based Art Class, Nurturing Proficiency through Voice, Choice and Reflective Teaching, Theresa Cerceo Dr. Levesque Elementary, Wisdom Middle/High School Visual Arts
  • Proficiency-Based Education in Visual Art, Gloria Hewett Mount View Middle School Visual Arts
  • Gold, Silver or Bronze? A Rubric fit for the Olympics!, Pam Kinsey Easton Schools Music
  • Rappin’ Differentiated Instruction and Implementing Standards Based Grading, Lisa Neal Nokomis Regional High School Performing Arts

Theresa         IMG_1273

IMG_1276USM, Portland – Friday, April 3

  • The Studio Habits of Mind: Using the “Hidden Curriculum” to Encourage Student Autonomy, Lisa Ingraham Madison Elementary School Visual Arts
  • The Recipe: Ingredients in a Proficiency-Based Curriculum, Michaela DiGianvittorio and Sarah Gould Gray-New Gloucester High School Visual Arts
  • Unpacking the Standards with your BFF (Best Foot Forward), Cynthia Keating, Village Elementary School Music and Kate Smith, Central Elementary School Music
  • The Foolish Man Builds his House Upon the Sand: Laying a Firm Foundation for the Arts (and life) in Early Childhood, Judy Fricke Main Street Music Studios Music
  • Writing What We Do: A Guide to Standards-Based Curriculum Mapping & Unit Design, Brian McPherson, Woodside Elementary School Visual Arts and Jake Sturtevant, Bonny Eagle High School Music
  • Using Digital Process Folios as a Journaling Approach to Self Assessment, Melanie Crowe Marshwood Middle School Visual Arts
  • Hatching A Songbird: Teaching and Assessing Singing Skills at the Primary Level, Patti Gordan Raymond Elementary School Music
  • Moving Towards Your Goals: Using Technology for Self-Assessment in a Performing Arts Classroom, Emma Campbell Thornton Academy Dance
  • Dancing With the Standards: How to Incorporate Standards-Based Dance and Movement Activities in Classroom Learning and Assessment, John Morris Dance
  • The How and Why of Digital Portfolios, Jeff Orth Richmond Middle/High School Visual Arts

IMG_2242

IMG_2231

IMG_2217Thanks also to MAAI Teacher Leaders Janie Snider, Jenni Null, and Shari Tarleton.

Artist showcases took place at each Mega with Teaching Artists John Morris and Stevie McGary provided information on their role and some movement as well.

In the afternoon sessions Proficiency-Based Education and Teacher Effectiveness were the discussion topics. Teachers shared what is happening in their schools, had a chance to ask each other questions and learn from what others are doing. Thanks to the following Teacher Leaders who facilitated the discussion:

UMO – Gloria Hewett and Jen Nash

USM – Jake Sturtevant and Amy Cousins (and several others assisted)

Both Megas were successful due to the work of Leadership Team members:

UMO – Catherine Ring

USM – Rob Westerberg and Jeff Beaudry

A special THANK YOU to Laura Artesani who arranged for the space on the UMaine Orono campus. And to Jeff Beaudry who arranged for the space on the USM, Portland campus!

At the end of the day at USM I said to all the participants how proud I was of the work all visual and performing arts teachers do. I know that the jobs you do can be challenging. At the end of the day at UMaine Orono Catherine asked folks how they were feeling and these are some of the words expressed by the group: inspiring – exhausted but happy – encouraged – enthusiastic – can’t wait to try things back in my classroom – my head is full – overwhelmed but supported – not alone anymore – great resources.  Catherine’s word: proud.

If you didn’t attend any of the four Mega-regional workshops provided this school year by MAAI and are looking for resources I suggest that you go to http://www.maineartsassessment.com/.

h1

Successful Mega!

December 2, 2014

MAAI Mega MDIHS

The feedback is clear – the Maine Arts Assessment Initiative’s Mega – regional workshop at MDI High School last week was a success! Participants learned new information and the work that is done each day in classrooms across Maine was reinforced. Once again the highlight was the opportunity for Arts educators to come together for a professional development opportunity that was designed specifically for them.

Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 10.48.20 PM

A HUGE THANK YOU to Charlie Johnson and his colleagues at MDI High School for hosting, to the MAAI Teacher Leaders who provided outstanding workshops: Janie Snider, Lisa Ingraham, Shannon Westphall, Frances Kellogg, Sue Barre, Charlie Johnson, to Teaching Artist Stevie McGary for the workshop and artists showcase, and to Catherine Ring, Rob Westerberg, and Nancy Salmon who provided technical assistance and leadership for the day!

I LOVE reading the feedback and how the day influenced participants thinking and teaching. Don’t take my word for it, below is what some of the participants said. I will post more in the near future along with a video that Charlie created to document the day.

  • I can’t believe how quickly this day flew by! As always, I wish that we had more time like this and opportunities to meet… I love these MAAI conferences, I always leave feeling more grounded and ready to take action
  • I like the Habits of Mind posters and the idea of the check list to keep throughout a project to assess each habit… These were really solid examples of what can be done.
  • I have already been implementing a few of these processes into my curriculum. Now, I just need to communicate this to my students in a clearer, more consistent manner.
  • Our district is focusing on Habits of Mind. I didn’t realize Studio Habits of Mind are different, but similar. Definitely a lot of useful information.
  • On the arts assessment website http://www.maineartsassessment.com there is a proficiency toolbox that I will be able to revamp my assessments at my school.

I LEARNED…

  • how to authentically apply the learning results to assessment
  • how to create a simple rubric for standards is an easy way to keep track of what 1, 2, 3, 4 etc actually means
  • simple, quick class assessments concrete examples of student growth — A+
  • about how to apply assessments to the art classroom and how to make the language usable for students of all ages
  • recording with the ipad for quick assessment
  • strategies for holding myself and my students accountable for what they are learning and creating in the art room
  • engage and persist can be a way to think about behavior in a positive way
  • about some fun and creative resources to help with assessing my students
  • how students demonstrate their learning through a hands-on project (pinhole cameras)
  • even a quick 60-second movement can benefit across the school day
  • how to clearly describe different standards and allow students to have an important part in the grading process
  • some quick and effective ways to assess students on the fly in the elementary music setting, and how to score and record them.
  • all about the site: http://www.maineartsassessment.com/, I LOVE IT. Need to spend loads of time there.

The above list includes just some of the feedback from November 25. If this is information that you’d like to learn more about please be sure and attend another Mega-regional workshop that is planned for this school year. The dates and locations are below and the link to the registration is http://mainearts.maine.gov/Pages/Education/MAAI-Mega-Regionals-2014-2015#

%d bloggers like this: