Archive for the ‘Dance’ Category

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Art Dance

January 15, 2020

Lil Buck

This dance was created to celebrate an exhibit in Paris that included several modern artworks. I couldn’t take my eyes off of the moves this dancer, Lil Buck, made while moving through the exhibit.

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Keep it Moving

January 12, 2020

Twyla Thorp’s book

I love Ken Robinson’s story about choreographer Twyla Tharp and I’m excited to learn that Twyla’s new book is called Keep it Moving: Lessons for the Rest of Your Life At age 78 she is talking about staying young, she is referring to the importance of staying healthy. She said. “If you want to have a future, you’ve got to provide for that now.” Twyla is a Tony-Award-winning choreographer and dance pioneer and this isn’t her first book. If interested, READ this piece from the New York Times to learn more.

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Congrats Jerry Barry!

December 16, 2019

50 directors who make a difference

Jerry Barry, who has been teaching music for 30 years, from Falmouth High School has been selected as one of ’50 Directors Who Make a Difference’ by the School Band and Orchestra Magazine (SBO).

Each year hundreds of music teachers are nominated by students, colleagues, musical instrument retailers, parents, administrators and friends. Nominations came from all states this year and educators were nominated because someone recognizes their hard work and dedication.

Each director is asked to share their proudest teaching moments, how they hope to make a difference in students’ lives, and most important lessons they try to teach their students.

JERRY’S STORY

What is your proudest moment as an educator?

There is not one single “ah-ha” moment, but what I am most proud of is that students in the Falmouth Music Program feel respected and valued as musicians and that their efforts in the performing arts matter, both within our school and the larger community. The music program is important in the town of Falmouth and it enjoys broad support from parents, teachers, and administrators. Students have a place and a space to excel as performers. The success of the K-12 music department is due to an engaging, active, purposeful collaboration of the district’s performing arts teachers supporting the education of our great students who are highly motivated and eager to learn.

How do you hope to make a difference in your students’ lives?

I hope to engage the students in a way that is enjoyable, meaningful, and encouraging to them and their effort to learn. I make a consistent effort to connect individually with the young person trying to play well on their instruments, now and in the future. They want to succeed. I strive to learn about them and their interests beyond band. Most often a bit of humor in class works really well. When there is a fun atmosphere, it promotes a positive student/teacher relationship, and then the teacher can more easily help the students connect to the content – performing music!

 

What’s the most important lesson that you try to teach your students?

Personal improvement is what matters most. No matter who you are or what you are doing, people should always strive to do their best …to be a bit better tomorrow. Start with where you are, dig in, persevere, and keep moving forward. Swimmers and runners try to be just a little bit faster each time they go out. Not everyone wins, but the goal is “personal best”. There is an opportunity for everyone to provide their own unique contribution to their ensemble.

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Dance Dance Dance

December 10, 2019

Dance Education grant

Thanks to Martha Piscuskas for providing information for this blog post.She is the interim director for arts education, Maine Arts Commission.

Hunt and Allison Smith

Nearing the gym, through the corridor literally owned and decorated by the K-third grade Central School students in South Berwick, one could already hear the rhythmical claps of a class fully engaged in old-time dancing. Recently I paid a visit to Kate Smith’s music program, where the whole school was treated to a residency with Maine Arts Commission Teaching Artists Hunt and Allison Smith, who played and taught old English, Irish and even Russian dances throughout the  week.

Thanks to the leadership of Kate and the Physical Education Teacher, Kristan Tiede, the school received a Maine Arts Commission Dance Education Grant and funding from the Marshwood Education Fund to bring this duo to play their fiddle, accordion and teach traditional set dances in circles, squares, and lines over three days. The teaching artists held the attention well of the students, no matter which age group. Even parents, siblings and teachers got to join in with a community family contradance one evening. Says Kate, “I know the residency with the Smiths will renew my confidence in teaching units that embed dance in music units in a more thoughtful, appropriate and successful way.  

I love the opportunity to integrate other subjects and collaborate with peers deepening student learning while giving us the chance  to learn from each other.”

I invite you to learn more about the Maine Arts Commission grant opportunities and the Teaching Artist roster.

The dance education grant at the Maine Arts Commission was established in 2012 with the help of Thornton Academy dance educator Emma Campbell and several dance programs and studios in southern Maine. Through a fund raiser performance they have contributed thousands of dollars so students, school communities, and teaching artists  across the state could benefit from dance education learning opportunities.

If you have any questions about arts education programs at the Maine Arts Commission please contact Martha Piscuskas, Interim Director of Arts Education.

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Early Childhood Conference

December 6, 2019

Young Audiences

2020 National Conference – Young Audiences Arts for Learning. March 25-27, Nopsi Hotel, New Orleans – Arts from the Start: An Exploration of Early Childhood Learning. This year’s conference will explore timely issues around the theme of early childhood learning.

Call for Workshop Proposals
Deadline: January 15, 2020

Save the Date!

March 25-27, 2020

 NOPSI Hotel
317 Baronne St., New Orleans, LA 70112

Proposals are now being accepted for workshop sessions that address the conference theme, or relate to other priority topics as detailed in the 2020 Conference Workshop Session RFP Guidelines and Application document.

To Submit a Proposal, please download, review, and fill out the 2020 RFP Guidelines and Application document. Email the completed application form to Lauren Altschuler (lauren@ya.org) by 5:00 pm ET on January 15, 2020. Incomplete applications will not be considered. You will receive email confirmation upon receipt of your proposal.

Evaluation and Selection of workshop proposals will be completed by a Conference Advisory Committee. Lead Workshop Session Presenters will be notified via email of the final selection by February 3, 2020.

Questions? Please contact Lauren Altschuler at lauren@ya.org or 212.860.1563 ext. 107.

Stay tuned for the Official 2020 Conference Site, conference.youngaudiences.org, for the latest information, including how to book accommodations through YA’s room block at  NOPSI Hotel, where workshop sessions will be held.

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The Ross Sisters

November 30, 2019

Solid Potato Salad

A real treat – amazing dancing and singing from a different era.

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Mary Poppins

November 6, 2019

Camden Hills Regional High School

The Camden Hills Regional High School musical “Mary Poppins” is taking flight this November. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays, Nov. 8, 9, 15 and 16, at 7 p.m. and Sundays, Nov. 10 and 17, at 2 p.m. What makes this show unique is the double-casting of the lead characters, giving more students a chance to embody the iconic roles; they switch every other night.

Read the entire Mary Poppins article from the Village Soup at THIS LINK.

 

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